standardized

This is a discussion on standardized within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; what does the term standardized mean? I know it has something to do with the std lib's...

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    127

    standardized

    what does the term standardized mean? I know it has something to do with the std lib's

  2. #2
    Deathray Engineer MacGyver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,211

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    127
    really didnt help much

  4. #4
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,668
    To make something standard.
    A standard may be seen as a specification to ad-here to.
    C++ is standardized, meaning that all compiler vendors who create a compiler must make sure that it behaves according to the standard.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    127
    whats the standard?

  6. #6
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,668
    What do you mean, what's the standard?
    The C++ standards committee writes the current C++ standards - they control what C++ is and what it becomes.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    127
    im not sure im pretty new

  8. #8
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,668
    In very basic terms, it's instructions for how the language should work.
    It's instructions for compiler vendors how to make their compilers work and
    it's instructions for programmers on how to write the code in such a way that it compiles into the target format that the compiler compiles it into.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  9. #9
    Deathray Engineer MacGyver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,211
    Quote Originally Posted by herWter View Post
    really didnt help much
    Ask a crappy question, get a crappy answer.

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    127
    how was that a crappy question?

  11. #11
    Deathray Engineer MacGyver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,211

Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

Similar Threads

  1. Why learn C#?
    By Newbeee in forum C# Programming
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 08-17-2009, 08:44 AM
  2. are srand() and rand() 's implementations standardized?
    By cyberfish in forum C++ Programming
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-26-2008, 12:07 AM
  3. C++ tests.
    By VirtualAce in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 06-30-2006, 06:51 AM

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21