Calling non-static functions on static variables

This is a discussion on Calling non-static functions on static variables within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; In the Controller class, I have the following: Code: static Controller the; Controller() { static Controller the=*this; } In my ...

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    Calling non-static functions on static variables

    In the Controller class, I have the following:
    Code:
    static Controller the;
    Controller()
    	{
    		static Controller the=*this;
    	}
    In my main function:
    Code:
    static Controller::the->mainloop();
    mainloop() is a non-static function of the Controller class. This doesn't work. I'm pretty sure I'm calling it wrong.

  2. #2
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    Controller::the.mainloop();
    Remove "static" keyword. Only required when defining variables.
    Since "the" isn't a pointer, you can't use "->", you must use ".".
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    thanks

    Thanks a lot. It's kinda inconsistent and unintuitive...

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    No, not really. What did you expect? I find it exactly what it should be.
    No complications.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    BMJ
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    "the" is the most unintuitive variable name you could possibly use O_o

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    If, lets say, you have a person named John Smith, sometimes you can also see the name written Smith, John. Likewise, "the controller" is Controller::the. I got the habit from Java, where you would have Controller.the.

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    Aha. Another Java user.
    No wonder, then.
    You'll get used to it. C++ is far superior to Java
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    What are you trying to do here?
    It is too clear and so it is hard to see.
    A dunce once searched for fire with a lighted lantern.
    Had he known what fire was,
    He could have cooked his rice much sooner.

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    BMJ
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    Is Controller supposed to be a singleton class?

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    In the constructor of 'Controller' you affect *this to a static variable of type 'Controller' ? What do you want to do?

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    Assuming you want a singleton class, do something like this:

    Code:
    class Controller {
    public:
      static Controller *the;
    
      static void init()
      {
        the = new Controller();
      }
    
      // declare other functions here
    
    private:
      Controller()
      {
        // do initialization here
      }
    }
    Then somewhere near the start of your program, do this:

    Code:
    Controller::init();

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elysia View Post
    Remove "static" keyword. Only required when defining variables.
    Not true. Class member functions can be static; the only difference is that they are called outside the context of particular objects.

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    Captain Crash brewbuck's Avatar
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    The word "static" in a static variable declaration doesn't mean the same thing as the word "static" in a static member declaration -- two unrelated concepts that happen to overload the same keyword.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grumpy View Post
    Not true. Class member functions can be static; the only difference is that they are called outside the context of particular objects.
    The point Elysia was trying to make is that they are not used when applying variables or functions. Yes, the static key word has several uses.
    It is too clear and so it is hard to see.
    A dunce once searched for fire with a lighted lantern.
    Had he known what fire was,
    He could have cooked his rice much sooner.

  15. #15
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    Yes, point was that you don't use "static" when calling a function.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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