Is there a script to track when a floder/file was accessed and by who?

This is a discussion on Is there a script to track when a floder/file was accessed and by who? within the C Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Originally Posted by Elysia I never saw the need for moving the page file to another disk since I saw ...

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elysia View Post
    I never saw the need for moving the page file to another disk since I saw no speed improvements. Nor do I see why it needs to be 1.5x or 2.0x the amount of physical memory. pagefile is currently 2 GB of a 3 GB memory system. Not a single pagefile related problem so far.
    You probably don't need 3GB of RAM then [In which case, you also won't see any improvement from moving it around, of course]

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  2. #17
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    Maybe not, but what's the point of removing it?
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    That's not what I meant, and I think you know it. But the location of the page-file is pretty meaningless if it's not being used. In fact, I saw a link to somewhere "how to disable pagefile" or some such. Can't remember where I saw it, but it can be done - of course, if your app by mistake happens to start allocating tons of memory, you may run out all of a sudden, which is no good when you have no way to extend the memory... Pagefile gives you that option.

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    Please don't PM me for help - and no, I don't do help over instant messengers.

  4. #19
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    Also, when you defrag your C: drive, if you see those big green blocks that are unmovable -- that would be your pagefile. By moving it to it's own partition, the Windows Defrag program (which is pretty inept to begin with) has more room to work with, which is always a good thing when your dealing with MS Defrag.
    If you move your pagefile to a completely separate hard disk, you'd probably notice more of a difference than just putting it on a separate partition, but then who really feels like wasting a whole HD just for the pagefile?
    You can use perfmon to record all read/write activity to your pagefile. I'll bet yours is still being used a lot even though you're not using your full 3GB of RAM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by matsp View Post
    That's not what I meant, and I think you know it. But the location of the page-file is pretty meaningless if it's not being used. In fact, I saw a link to somewhere "how to disable pagefile" or some such. Can't remember where I saw it, but it can be done - of course, if your app by mistake happens to start allocating tons of memory, you may run out all of a sudden, which is no good when you have no way to extend the memory... Pagefile gives you that option.

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    Yes, page files can be disabled, but it's not a good idea, usually. I'd love if Windows could actually keep everything in memory without paging it (unless it finds that the 3 GB of physical memory is exceeded), but unfortunately this is not so. The pagefile is not recommended to disable.

    Quote Originally Posted by cpjust View Post
    Also, when you defrag your C: drive, if you see those big green blocks that are unmovable -- that would be your pagefile. By moving it to it's own partition, the Windows Defrag program (which is pretty inept to begin with) has more room to work with, which is always a good thing when your dealing with MS Defrag.
    MS Defrag is crap and you know it. I use an excellent 3rd part solution for this. And since the pagefile is locked in size, it doesn't get fragmented plus there's 16.7 GB (out of 40 GB) free on the system partition - more than enough to defrag properly.

    If you move your pagefile to a completely separate hard disk, you'd probably notice more of a difference than just putting it on a separate partition, but then who really feels like wasting a whole HD just for the pagefile?
    Like I mentioned before, I never noticed any huge speed performance increase when I did that (I have 4 HDs).

    You can use perfmon to record all read/write activity to your pagefile. I'll bet yours is still being used a lot even though you're not using your full 3GB of RAM.
    Yes, of course. That's how windows works. It always pages things out to the pagefile. But performance is sound, nevertheless.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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