how to define string without null at the end!?

This is a discussion on how to define string without null at the end!? within the C Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hi! I have a two string arrays, that I sent over the network, but the problem is that when I ...

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    how to define string without null at the end!?

    Hi!
    I have a two string arrays, that I sent over the network, but the problem is that when I define them, GCC adds null at the end. I know it sopose to be like that, because it's string termination character, but I need to be able to define array, without it! Any suggestions? Thank you!

  2. #2
    MFC killed my cat! manutd's Avatar
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    At the other end, just eliminate the null character.
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    {Jaxom,Imriel,Liam}'s Dad Kennedy's Avatar
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    Send only bytes of strlen().

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    Quote Originally Posted by manutd
    At the other end, just eliminate the null character.
    my_arr[last_element] = null; ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kennedy
    Send only bytes of strlen().
    I'll try that out right now!

  5. #5
    ATH0 quzah's Avatar
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    If it doesn't have a null character, it's not a string. A string by definition is zero or more characters terminated by a null character. Thus, if you omit the null character, you no longer have a string, you just have an array of characters.
    Code:
    char notastring[10] = { 'n', 'o', 't', 'a', 's', 't', 'r', 'i', 'n', 'g' };
    As such, you should not be using string based functions on it.


    Quzah.
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    Whatever you do with strings, the nice thing is they are still just arrays terminated with a null character, strlen allows you to know the size of the string and position of the null character, so you can handle it as either a string or an array of chars, in whatever way is convenient.

  7. #7
    and the hat of wrongness Salem's Avatar
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    > I have a two string arrays, that I sent over the network, but the problem is that when I define them, GCC adds null at the end
    So what's so hard about
    char buff[ ] = "hello";

    Yes there is a \0 at the end, but it's dead easy to ignore it by doing
    send( buff, strlen(buff) );
    rather than
    send( buff, sizeof(buff) );

    If you're receiving a \0, then the only reason is that you sent a \0.
    It's simply a matter of being able to count, and using the return result of various functions.
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
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