The learning curve associated with c.

This is a discussion on The learning curve associated with c. within the C Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; First off, I'm a self-taught computer programmer. My current occupation is warehouse clerk. In Sept, it would have been three ...

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    The learning curve associated with c.

    First off, I'm a self-taught computer programmer. My current occupation is warehouse clerk.

    In Sept, it would have been three years since I started to seriously study the c langauge. Ie, look at how some of the experienced programmers coded and asking lots and lots of questions. I've also have back tracking through old concepts, learning from my mistakes, and keep moving on. No matter how slow and dismal it might seen at times.

    I was wondering at point do I just ask "This might be over my head" and just take up an easier hobby. The reason I bring this up was because I was reading the other other half of the book "Unix Network Programming: The Sockets Networking API", Vol. 1 by the Late Dr. Stevens. I occurred to me it took me a little bit over 2 years to get some grasp over the c programming language to grasp some of the subtilities in his book.

    This also makes me begin to wonder how much more of the finer points I missed in his book because I don't have a full mastery over the language.

  2. #2
    Its hard... But im here swgh's Avatar
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    Take it from me, it takes a long time, pateince and lots and lots of prac tice to master a computer program language. I do a mixture of C and C++ although I know more C than C++. When you said should I give up, I emplore you to carry on. When things seem to be as you put "over my head", then take a break, read a little, practice with it then make up your own little tester programs then carry on if you get the jist of it.

    Programing is NOT simple, I own about 6 programing books in total but no book can teach you everything. Languages especially C++ are being updated regually. Try your best and keep going. When things get too tough, break and ask for support. Good luck -pete

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    Hi cdalten

    I agree with swgh. One of the most important things for a programmer in perserverence. If you've kept going this long, I think you are going to be just fine.

    swgh offers good advice, when you get stuck... take a break... try looking at the problem again (or the section of the book involved or whatever) and try again. Don't be afraid to ask for help. That is what forums like these are for.

    Good luck and may the force be with you.

    Eddie

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    Hi cdalten,

    First off, don't sweat it.

    Here's my take on it: It's kinda like a foreign language. You can learn Swedish, learn some Swedish grammar and vocabulary, but if you're never (or rarely) in a place where you can attempt to speak Swedish, you're going to have a hard time.

    I make my living programming, and use C predominantly. I've been at this for 25 years, using C for probably the last 20, and I am STILL learning things about the language. But, the key for me is the fact that I use it for at least eight hours, five days (sometimes six depending on deadlines) a week. Certain things become second nature....

    Beyond that, I don't know what advice to give you......

    If you want to make a career change, you might want to test the waters, and see who might be willing to hire you on and give you a chance to grow.

    If you want to continue it as a hobby, you might consider trying to work on some open source project, starting small, and growing there.

    If you love it, and enjoy it, and want to keep at it, by all means, keep at it.....
    Mr. Blonde: You ever listen to K-Billy's "Super Sounds of the Seventies" weekend? It's my personal favorite.

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    I know one of the hiring managers at a software company here in San Francisco. He was telling me my best chance of being able to land a programming job would to maybe start some meaningful open source projects, the highlight that when I was looking for some kind of entry level job.

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