and then we shall be wirefree

This is a discussion on and then we shall be wirefree within the C Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; heard lately that most of the programming on a wirless mobile carrier's end (such as Orange Telecom) is done with ...

  1. #1
    lonelyplanetwanderer
    Guest

    and then we shall be wirefree

    heard lately that most of the programming on a wirless mobile carrier's end (such as Orange Telecom) is done with C...would greatly appreciate if any1 out there would happen to have any knowledge/work experience as far as this goes...

    what sorta logic building exercises are undertaken?...what is the programming logic?...how does it translate in business terms e.g. i switch on phone, i dial a number - then how is the call routed?...what does it involve/entail?...any links to websites/knowledge bases would also be appreciated...

    looking forward...cheers!

  2. #2
    Registered User Engineer's Avatar
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    Oct 2001
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    In order to get the full picture you need to have some networking experience. I am assuming that you now what TCP/IP is and how it works.

    Let's take Nortel's IP phone for example: You pick up the phone and dial a number. You phone makes a lookup for that phone number in its own routing table, and if it is not there, tries to look the number with some Third Party service. Upon success it now the IP address of the phone number you are trying to connect. It tryes to connect to it, and upon success it establishes a virtual channel between your phone and the phone you are calling. At this moment you are able to hear the dial tone. If someone picks up, then the channel becomes active and you can talk to whomever you were trying to reach.

    Keep in mind that this a brief outline of how things work. There is a lot of stuff involved like cables(fiber-optic, coaxial, wirelless, etc.), hubs, switches, routers, firewalls, gateways, TCP/IP, X.25, ATM, Frame Relay, other networking protocols( routing - ARP, RIP, BGP, EGP, OSPF; application - POP3, SMTP, SNMP, FTP, TFTP, BootP, DHCP, DNS, Open Systems Interconnect 7 layer stack and a lot of other stuff.

    I can remember any good links of the top of my head, but there are some nice networking tutorials on the Cisco website (www.cisco.com). Also try doing a search on google.com on some of things I mentioned - I am sure you will dig up more than enough stuff.
    1 rule of the Samurai Code: if you have nothing to say, don't say anything at all!

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