Borland - free for commercial use?

This is a discussion on Borland - free for commercial use? within the C Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Although I'm sure I'm still light years away from making anything of this caliber, I was curious about if I ...

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    119

    Borland - free for commercial use?

    Although I'm sure I'm still light years away from making anything of this caliber, I was curious about if I made a program with the free borland compiler, if I could sell it legally. I'm thinking it's the way for me to go, because it has more functions built in and all. Also a big reason is that according to the FAQ, my best bet for portability is a compiler with a build in function or the curses library, which I'm not even ready to learn about yet (hell, I'm still learning c itself!). For instance, to clear the screen, all the methods that FAQ has are good, but apparently my best bet is like I said, to download a compiler with a built in function for it, instead of a putchar \n loop or one of the other options, like the curses library.

    But if I download this compiler now, and get used to using it, it would not be good to find out later that I couldn't sell a product made with it, due to some legal mumbo jumbo

    I hope that all came out right, and made sense.

  2. #2
    cwr
    cwr is offline
    Registered Luser cwr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    868
    This isn't really on topic, and why don't you just read the license agreement you're presented with when you download and/or install the free Borland compiler?

    As for clearing the screen, I would say there are not many new commercial programs under Windows that use the console, so this particular thing isn't really going to be much of an issue, no?

    If you want portability, use ncurses. If you want something to work on a specific platform, use whatever you like.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    119
    good point, and your right, this is off topic, is it possible to delete a thread you made?

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    119
    Since I haven't been able to find a way to delete this thread, I'll ask something on subject...

    I've been trying to learn the command line way of invoking my gcc compiler, and google isn't much help. I keep seeing "GNU" - but no where does it say what that stands for.

    And the manuals I've found online (or the closest thing to a manual) tells command line options, but doesn't give examples.

    I tried "gcc program.c program.obj -i C:\pacific\include -l C:\pacific\lib" with no luck, as well as many other variations and parameters.

    I know I can always just use the IDE to do this for me, but I just feel that I should learn it as well, like it's good to know...

  5. #5
    Registered User ssharish2005's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Posts
    1,682
    right, command line arguments are one of the thing where u are allowed to enter data as a intial input to your program from the command promt. for instance if u wanted to specify the file name, or any numeraial vales and it may be anything which fits into the 2D char array. the following is a sample code of how to use a command line arguments
    Code:
    #include<stdio.h>
    
    int main(int argc, char **argv)
    {
        int i;
        
        printf("Total no of argument %d\n", argc);
        printf("Arguments are as follo\n");
        for(i=0;i<argc;i++)
        printf("%s\n",argv[i]);
        
        getchar();
    }
    /*myoutput
    a.out 12 45 87 36 96 45 0
    Total no of argument 8
    Arguments are as follo
    a.out
    12
    45
    87
    36
    96
    45
    0
    
    */
    so u can see that the data eneted from the command like have been processed by the program and displayed. so if u want, u can use those values for any other applaication. if u see there the main fucntion takes two arguments. the first aragument argc of type int gives u total no of argumnets and the agrv will contain the actual argumnets itself.

    hope this helps

    ssharish2005

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    119
    Actually, that's not exactly what I was asking, but you awnsered a question I've been meaning to ask for quite some time and kept forgetting, thanks a lot, it's very helpful!

  7. #7
    ex-DECcie
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    125
    Quote Originally Posted by Ash1981

    I've been trying to learn the command line way of invoking my gcc compiler, and google isn't much help. I keep seeing "GNU" - but no where does it say what that stands for.

    GNU stands for GNU's Not Unix.

    You can learn far more than you want to know if you go to www.gnu.org

    It's my impression that most of the folks on this board seem to be programming on Windows platforms. I make my living programming on Linux and other Unix-like platforms, and GNU is very prevalent there.

    GCC now stands for GNU Compiler Collection (I think it used to just be GNU CC, but could be wrong...). GCC has a number of compilers included - C, C++, Fortran, and Java if I recall.

    Hope this helps....

  8. #8
    Super Moderator VirtualAce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    9,590
    It's my impression that most of the folks on this board seem to be programming on Windows platforms.
    Ya think. Maybe because Bill has taken over the computer world and just about every computer has had or does have Windows running on it. I didn't say it was right or I agreed with it, but it is the facts. Companies are not going to program for a platform that doesn't have the market, unless they specialize in that market. Linux hopefully will one day be the OS, but that day is not here yet.

    Big change will be when DX games can run on Linux. Then I'll switch.

  9. #9
    Registered /usr
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Newport, South Wales, UK
    Posts
    1,262
    Quote Originally Posted by Bubba
    Big change will be when DX games can run on Linux. Then I'll switch.
    Cedega?
    (Runs)

  10. #10
    ex-DECcie
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    125
    Quote Originally Posted by Bubba
    Ya think. Maybe because Bill has taken over the computer world and just about every computer has had or does have Windows running on it. I didn't say it was right or I agreed with it, but it is the facts. Companies are not going to program for a platform that doesn't have the market, unless they specialize in that market. Linux hopefully will one day be the OS, but that day is not here yet.

    Big change will be when DX games can run on Linux. Then I'll switch.

    My job consists of backend, e-commerce, and web programming, and while my company develops a Windows product, and our desktops are Windows, our backend servers run Linux.

    That seems to be somewhat prevalent around here anyway.

    Can't disagree with anything you've said though.

  11. #11
    Registered User Jaqui's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    416
    Quote Originally Posted by Bubba
    Linux hopefully will one day be the OS, but that day is not here yet.
    well if the EEC actually enforces the court ruling it will be happening within the EEC soon.

    This is the latest news article about it.

    I really don't see MS complying with a court ruling to give open source developers the specifications for the communication protocols that would allow your linux workstation to connect to an AD / MSSQL server box as easily as a windows workstation, with the same functionality.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Henager
    If the average user can put a CD in and boot the system and follow the prompts, he can install and use Linux. If he can't do that simple task, he doesn't need to be around technology.

  12. #12
    cwr
    cwr is offline
    Registered Luser cwr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    868
    Quote Originally Posted by fgw_three
    It's my impression that most of the folks on this board seem to be programming on Windows platforms.
    I'd say it's fairly even (Windows and non-Windows), but I only ever read/post in this section, no the Windows or Linux specific programming forums. I find that it's more usual for a poster from Windows to ask something here that's platform specific because a lot of the new posters are unable to distinguish between the C language and Windows specific functions. On the other hand, the ones coming from another operating system seem to more likely be aware that all the world is not using their operating system.

Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21