Possible to create methods for data in structs?

This is a discussion on Possible to create methods for data in structs? within the C Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Originally Posted by Dave_Sinkula > Or in C++ you could use what you had. well that sounds rather appealing... Originally ...

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_Sinkula
    >
    Or in C++ you could use what you had.
    well that sounds rather appealing...
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_Sinkula
    >
    [edit]By the way, this
    Code:
       diffuser diff = {zeroEnergy};
    zeroed out those variables.
    then perhaps I should look into that way of doing it... or perhaps I am looking to hard to save myself 2 extra lines of code that overall probably keep things simpler.

    is there any situation in which a C++ compiler would complain about anything that the C compiler didn't have a problem with?

    ie should g++ -lm -lncurses -o dmc dmc.c ever complain if gcc -lm -lncurses -o dmc dmc.c doesn't?

    <edit>
    I wonder how hard it would be to write a textfield (like the one i am writing in) that is modal and supports some ViM commands... AND lets you use tab
    </edit>
    Last edited by eccles; 12-10-2004 at 11:27 PM.
    VIM + gcc + beer... does life get any better?

  2. #17
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    There are some things that are allowed in C that don't work in C++. Functions with an implicit return type, for example, or passing any amount of parameters to a function with an empty argument list. Old-style parameter lists are also disallowed in C++. (Not that you often see them - the only working piece of code I know that uses them is the zlib library.)
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  3. #18
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    so do you have any thoughts then on the relative virtues of C/C++ in scientific computing applications?
    VIM + gcc + beer... does life get any better?

  4. #19
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    Often, C will be a little faster. Not always. C++ usually allows better modeling of the problem, thus making implementation simpler. In general, C++ requires a little less code to do the same thing.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

  5. #20
    & the hat of GPL slaying Thantos's Avatar
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    C will generally operate at a lower level then C++. Meaning that it will use fewer function calls and less memory then C++. The speed issue really depends on the program and for the most part is a non issue.

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