splitting a string

This is a discussion on splitting a string within the C Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hi, I need to split the input i receive from my file into two parts. File looks like this customerNo ...

  1. #1
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    splitting a string

    Hi,

    I need to split the input i receive from my file into two parts.

    File looks like this

    customerNo <space> typeofrequest

    eg

    1122 deposit

    how do i get the customer number as one string and the request in another?.

    I can do it in Java, but because c doesnt have checks like variablename.equals();

    i'm at a loss..

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Registered User ventolin's Avatar
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    look up strtok()

    if you cant find it...

    http://www.mkssoftware.com/docs/man3/strtok.3.asp
    Last edited by ventolin; 05-20-2004 at 02:12 AM.

  3. #3
    ATH0 quzah's Avatar
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    It's easier than strtok. Read the entire string using something like fgets, and then simply sscanf the buffer into two variables.

    Quzah.
    Hope is the first step on the road to disappointment.

  4. #4
    Code Goddess Prelude's Avatar
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    >I can do it in Java, but because c doesnt have checks like variablename.equals();
    C has a standard library just like Java. In <string.h> there's a function called strcmp that performs the equivalent operation as x.equals(y);. But because there isn't a native substring function, you would be better off using quzah's suggestion.
    My best code is written with the delete key.

  5. #5
    Registered User loopy's Avatar
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    Heres my version:

    Code:
    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <string.h>
    #include <unistd.h>
    
    int main()
    {
    	char buff[1024], result[1024], result1[1024];
    	FILE *file;
    	if ((file = fopen("/Source/file.txt", "r")) == NULL) {
    		fprintf(stderr, "fopen: Failed.\n");
    		exit(1);
    	}
    	if (fgets(buff, sizeof(buff), file) == NULL) {
    		fprintf(stderr, "fgets: Failed.\n");
    		exit(1);
    	}
    	sscanf(buff, "%s %s", &result, &result1);
    	fprintf(stdout, "Customer #: %s\nType: %s\n", result, result1);
    	if (fclose(file) == EOF) {
    		fprintf(stderr, "flcose: Failed.\n");
    		exit(1);
    	}
    	return 0;
    I wonder, 'sscanf()' suffers the same problems as 'scanf()'?
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  6. #6
    Code Goddess Prelude's Avatar
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    >I wonder, 'sscanf()' suffers the same problems as 'scanf()'?
    sscanf behaves the same way as scanf, yes. The biggest problem with scanf is that it works directly with stdin and doesn't mix well with other input functions. The second biggest problem with scanf is that it's very difficult to recover from effectively if an error occurs. sscanf solves the first problem because the "stream" is actually a string acquired elsehow. The second problem is solved by having the "stream" in memory. A string in memory is much easier to work with than an input stream when it comes to error handling.
    My best code is written with the delete key.

  7. #7
    Registered User loopy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prelude
    >I wonder, 'sscanf()' suffers the same problems as 'scanf()'?
    sscanf behaves the same way as scanf, yes. The biggest problem with scanf is that it works directly with stdin and doesn't mix well with other input functions. The second biggest problem with scanf is that it's very difficult to recover from effectively if an error occurs. sscanf solves the first problem because the "stream" is actually a string acquired elsehow. The second problem is solved by having the "stream" in memory. A string in memory is much easier to work with than an input stream when it comes to error handling.

    Ahhh, I see. We just have to hope the programmer can handle their OWN, input. ; )

    Thanks....
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