Books for learning C?

This is a discussion on Books for learning C? within the C Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; I was wondering what books you people out there used to help you learn C programming? I would like suggestions ...

  1. #1
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    Arrow Books for learning C?

    I was wondering what books you people out there used to help you learn C programming? I would like suggestions for books that you have personally used to learn C.
    I have very little programming experience but I'm interested in trying to learn C.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Code Goddess Prelude's Avatar
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    Algorithms in C: Robert Sedgewick
    The C Programming Language: Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie
    The Standard C Library: P.J. Plauger
    Expert C Programming: Peter van der Linden
    Pointers on C: Kenneth Reek

    Those should give you more than a good start, but only the second and last are for someone new to the language. Also take a look at the book reviews at www.accu.org.

    -Prelude
    My best code is written with the delete key.

  3. #3
    eat my shorts!
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    search over kazaa (ie borland, codewarrior, and visual in the documents section)

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    Just grab a C Primer book published by Sams. If you were asking for C++ books it might be a different story.

    www.accu.org has not updated it's book section in way too long. Although they have some good reviews on many books, it seems that they have discontinued to do reviews.

  5. #5
    Comment your source code! Lynux-Penguin's Avatar
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    Well, the best book I have used for C is
    ANSI C Applications and .... (something)
    really good for beginners

    umm, honostly. I have never learned much C from books, don't get me wrong, i was pointed in the right direction from books, but I learned not much from them. I was cruising the net about 2-3 years ago, when I found CPROGRAMMING.com. The message board had like 2 posts, by moderators but the tutorial section (up a little later) had some of the greatest tutorials out there, at the time C and C++ where very uncommon topics on the net.
    so first, I want to thank CPROGRAMMING
    um, I didn't register until last year, but my account was deleted ever since the new board was installed.

    Where did I learn C?
    Staring at source and struggling to understand it.
    It worked, although it was a bad way to learn it, but I am going to take a class soon.
    Linux is the best (in my opinion) place to start with C or C++
    I cannot stress how important Linux is to the open source communities.

    I currently use Ivor Horton's Learning C++ complete language
    for my C book. but I wouldn't recommend it to many, not the greatest material. The Tutorials on this site were far better.

    so just use the power of the internet and use a variety of books if possible. The author's opinion will be the thing that develops your C style, now you don't want to base it off of an author (Ivor Horton = perfect example; ) but base it off of a standard such as
    ANSI C which is why I recommend it to soo many.

    Don't get involved with C++ just yet, learn C++ after the basics of C. Not because C++ is complicated (it's not) but because C is the core structure of C++ and u don't want to jump into a moving river.

    Note: long post and mostly pointless

    Main points:
    ANSI C
    no C++
    Linux (for C users)
    Read FAQ
    The refrence card in my quote is quite usefull
    Use the tutorials on this board

    I hope this answers some of your questions.

    -Luke
    Asking the right question is sometimes more important than knowing the answer.
    Please read the FAQ
    C Reference Card (A MUST!)
    Pointers and Memory
    The Essentials
    CString lib

  6. #6
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    Actually Addison-Wesley is a really good publisher you might want to look into.

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    Programming in ANSI C/Stephen Kochan
    -k

  8. #8
    Guest Sebastiani's Avatar
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    Teach Yourself C
    ...by Herb Schilt
    //...Good starter book...

    C: A Software Engineering Approach
    ...by Peter Darnell and Philip Margolis
    //...Well written primer...

    C++ For C Programmers
    ...by Ira Pohl
    //...Great intro to C++

    ...but above all, code as much as possible, several hours per day if necessary!!
    Code:
    #include <cmath>
    #include <complex>
    bool euler_flip(bool value)
    {
        return std::pow
        (
            std::complex<float>(std::exp(1.0)), 
            std::complex<float>(0, 1) 
            * std::complex<float>(std::atan(1.0)
            *(1 << (value + 2)))
        ).real() < 0;
    }

  9. #9
    Im a Capricorn vsriharsha's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    In addition to the aforesaid, look into these also

    1. C-The Complete Refence by H. Schildt
    2. C Pearls by Yashwant Kanetkar (BPB Publications).

    These are for reference and advanced DOS programming respectively.

    -Harsha.
    Help everyone you can

  10. #10
    Registered User lliero's Avatar
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    hi

    my first book was

    C-The Complete Refence by H. Schildt


    its great,


    there are about three persons here who has that book <at least>


    prelude
    lliero
    vsriharsha


    thnx
    " programming is 1% syntax and 99% logic "

  11. #11
    Registered User hermit's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Art of programming

    The art of programming - computer science with C
    Lawlor
    - - fUnKy F3m@le - -

  12. #12
    Code Goddess Prelude's Avatar
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    C-The Complete Refence by H. Schildt

    its great,

    there are about three persons here who has that book <at least>

    prelude
    lliero
    vsriharsha
    I can only speak for myself, but I don't allow Schildt books in my house or office. Every time someone brings up how great his books are, I must admit that he's taken criticism well and learned how to program a bit better...but not much.

    -Prelude
    My best code is written with the delete key.

  13. #13
    and the hat of wrongness Salem's Avatar
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    Ah, the original void main'er

    May be easy to read, but wrong in oh so many ways....

    Think about it, how many books do you know written by HS do you know of - dozens no doubt.

    How long do you think it takes to become anything like decently competent in a subject to be able to write a book on a subject - years perhaps?

    How old should HS be now, if he was really that good at all those subjects?

    http://www.tuxedo.org/~esr/jargon/ht...llschildt.html

  14. #14
    Guest Sebastiani's Avatar
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    Geez, guys, why is everyone so tough on Herb? Though he may be wrong on so many points - let's face it: to the complete newbie he's a breath of fresh air compared to many of the other "so-called" beginners books!

    He was the only one out of the whole lot that would throw out immediately compilable code snippets, and written in the simplest syntax possible. Anyone who cannot appreciate Herb Schildt has forgotton how it was to be a beginner! <sigh>
    Code:
    #include <cmath>
    #include <complex>
    bool euler_flip(bool value)
    {
        return std::pow
        (
            std::complex<float>(std::exp(1.0)), 
            std::complex<float>(0, 1) 
            * std::complex<float>(std::atan(1.0)
            *(1 << (value + 2)))
        ).real() < 0;
    }

  15. #15
    and the hat of wrongness Salem's Avatar
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    > Geez, guys, why is everyone so tough on Herb
    Because he teaches you that thinks like this are OK

    char *buff;
    gets( buff );

    Are OK

    It might be nice and simple - which is an admirable aim, but it is also wrong. Being wrong is the worst thing for a newbie, because they don't have the experience to tell the difference, and accept what they see as correct.

    The problem is made worse, because in DOS, many of these simple errors are not immediately flagged. It's only when you write bigger programs that all this undefined behaviour starts to hurt.

    Several years later when they move to another system, all that they learnt is now horribly broken. If you thought learning C was tough, you should try unlearning it - because that is the situation in which many find themselves.

    > Though he may be wrong on so many points
    Good job there isn't a HS book on bungee jumping is all I can say.

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