advanced c programming by example

This is a discussion on advanced c programming by example within the C Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Did anyone read this book? What are your opinions? I tried searching it up on amazon. Its 400$, what the ...

  1. #1
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    advanced c programming by example

    Did anyone read this book?

    What are your opinions?

    I tried searching it up on amazon. Its 400$, what the ...?

    Is there any other place to buy this/get this book?

    I'd really like to check it out but i couldnt find it anywhere.

    http://www.amazon.com/Advanced-Progr.../dp/0534951406
    Last edited by Tool; 03-23-2010 at 08:40 AM.

  2. #2
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    That's gotta be a mistake. You might want to consider paying $40, but anyone who pays $400 is completely nuts.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

  3. #3
    and the hat of wrongness Salem's Avatar
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    WTF!?
    Quote Originally Posted by an amazon reviewer

    9 of 9 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars A must-have book!, February 15, 2000
    By Joegas "joegas" (Canberra, Australia) - See all my reviews
    I've got a few C-programming books, but this is the one that I love best of all. It is a gem of a book that resonates with simple, crystal-clear explanations on topics so seemingly difficult to understand in the classic book by Kernighan and Ritchie. I would recommend using these two books together.

    What makes this book even more entertaining and readable is that Perry is not afraid to lay on his idiosyncrasies regarding the practice of programming. There is a little hiccup, though, when he recommends the use of gets() and sscanf() together for nearly all input of strings from the terminal: gets() is widely known to be inferior to fgets(), and sscanf() is not discussed in the book at all!

    But all in all, a book that deserves full marks.
    OMG!
    For that money, I expect gold-plated perfection.
    Not moronic stupidity of the first order.
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
    If at first you don't succeed, try writing your phone number on the exam paper.
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    Jack of many languages Dino's Avatar
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    In 1997/98 when it was being written, there wasn't the emphasis on "safety" there is today.
    Mac and Windows cross platform programmer. Ruby lover.

    Quote of the Day
    12/20: Mario F.:I never was, am not, and never will be, one to shut up in the face of something I think is fundamentally wrong.

    Amen brother!

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    Nobody has this book?

    God!

    Then what other book should i get for C?

    I have finished reading K&R2.

    And im preety lost now. I thought i should go for C++ now, but im not so sure anymore.

    What should i do, help!
    Last edited by Tool; 03-23-2010 at 03:15 PM.

  6. #6
    and the hat of wrongness Salem's Avatar
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    Why do you need another book on C, if you have K&R2 ?

    You could try this one - C Unleashed
    Written by a group of regulars on comp.lang.c newsgroup.
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
    If at first you don't succeed, try writing your phone number on the exam paper.
    I support http://www.ukip.org/ as the first necessary step to a free Europe.

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    I dunno if i need it. You tell me. .

    Is one book (in this case K&R2) enough to "master" C?

    Should i move on to something else?

  8. #8
    and the hat of wrongness Salem's Avatar
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    What are you trying to prove?
    Master of "hello world" programming in 20,000 languages?

    What about all the other skills which go to making a competent programmer. Reading lots of books on the same (or other languages) won't tell you about that at all.

    Daily practice, and getting others to read your code is how you'll learn more than any amount of book reading will teach you.

    Software development - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Learn about
    - several different ways of designing software
    - how to write code which is easy to test
    - how to use source control systems
    - how to debug, find leaks etc
    - separating what the customer needs now, from what they might like later


    And yes, C unleashed is worth getting IMO.
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
    If at first you don't succeed, try writing your phone number on the exam paper.
    I support http://www.ukip.org/ as the first necessary step to a free Europe.

  9. #9
    Registered User matrixx333's Avatar
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    There's more to C than just understanding how to do loops, variables, expressions, arrays, functions, pointers, I/O, etc.....

    Have you learned:

    Sorting/Searching
    Data Structures (trees, heaps, stacks, qeues, etc.)

    Then there's other specifics like graphics programming, socket programming, AI, debugging........

    Every source I read says its a bad idea to skip from one language to the next until you've fully learned the first. I'd suggest re-analyzing what your goals are and pick the specific language that is going to help you accomplish those goals the best and go from there

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tool View Post
    Is one book (in this case K&R2) enough to "master" C?
    K&R (ansi ed.) is the only book you will ever need, IMHO.
    To become a "master" do the exercises in each chapter.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tool View Post
    Should i move on to something else?
    Nah!

  11. #11
    Registered User claudiu's Avatar
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    Not that I'm boasting, well maybe a little bit but I am the proud owner of a copy of the Kernighan and Ritchi original. Now, that's going to be worth something by 2050.... or so I hope

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dino View Post
    In 1997/98 when it was being written, there wasn't the emphasis on "safety" there is today.
    Maybe not but, even at that time, use of gets() was considered inadvisable.
    Right 98% of the time, and don't care about the other 3%.

    If I seem grumpy in reply to you, it is likely you deserve it. Suck it up, sunshine, and read this, this, and this before posting again.

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    K&R (ansi ed.) is the only book you will ever need, IMHO.
    To become a "master" do the exercises in each chapter.
    Yes, i did all the exercises.

    I dont know much about structures tho, so i decided i'll take a look at that.
    Data Structures (trees, heaps, stacks, qeues, etc.)
    Which book should i get for this tho?

    I mean K&R has only 3 examples at structures chapter.

  14. #14
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    What are you trying to prove?
    Master of "hello world" programming in 20,000 languages?
    Not sure if this completely connects with the rest of your criticism. I think there is a lot of value in learning different languages, to different extents (meaning yes, you should move beyond hello world in at least a few of them).

    What about all the other skills which go to making a competent programmer. Reading lots of books on the same (or other languages) won't tell you about that at all.

    Daily practice, and getting others to read your code is how you'll learn more than any amount of book reading will teach you.

    Software development - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    So I totally agree with that; there is such a thing as being "too academic" -- you (Tool) need to get on with it and write some software.


    Quote Originally Posted by Tool View Post
    I dont know much about structures tho, so i decided i'll take a look at that.

    Which book should i get for this tho?
    I think most of those individual concepts ("trees, heaps, stacks, qeues, etc.") can be learned using online tutorials and resources. However, one book who's approach I totally liked was "Computer Programming for Dummies", which is either out of print or I have the title wrong (I can check on that this afternoon, nb it is not the same book as "Beginning Programming for...").

    Anyway, it was not language specific (example were usually in C, Java, or pseudo code) but it did a great job of clearly and succinctly describing the essential properties of trees, stacks, heaps, and queues, and the same for common search algorithms (merge, quick, insert, bubble, selection, heap) etc etc. So that is one to keep your eye open for, it would make a pretty decent quick reference.

    Important to consider that all this stuff was probably developed as a solution to real needs/problems, which attempting to write a real functioning piece of software other people might use will hopefully present you with some (real needs/problems to resolve). As long as you at least have some vague idea of the fact that things like trees and graphs, etc, exist, you will have a pretty good idea of potential options beyond the simple array. Generally, they are just variations on the "linked list" concept, which have been refined thru years of widespread use.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

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