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This is a discussion on about c within the C Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; why they named as c programing y not d ,e ......... Then difference between structured programming and non- structured programing ...

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    about c

    why they named as c programing y not d ,e .........
    Then difference between structured programming and non- structured programing
    Then what is the meaning for (#) which is used in #include<stdio.h>

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    About Your question number one

    It was named "C" because many of its features were derived from an earlier language called "B", which according to Ken Thompson was a stripped-down version of the BCPL programming language.
    Courtesy of Wikipedia

    Second one # means preproccesive directives i think the name suggest means before the processing means even before the compilation

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    Yes, # is used by the pre-processor, before the compilation. So when #include the compiler knows which files to look into.

    I think C comes from Common, but not 100% sure

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    Quote Originally Posted by C_ntua View Post
    Yes, # is used by the pre-processor, before the compilation. So when #include the compiler knows which files to look into.

    I think C comes from Common, but not 100% sure
    I will extend the answer it will also include macro's #if 0 statments #ifdef calls etc.
    Or even all the stuff which starts with #

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    The C language was based on Ken Thompson's work on the B language.

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    thank

    thank u
    Quote Originally Posted by RockyMarrone View Post
    I will extend the answer it will also include macro's #if 0 statments #ifdef calls etc.
    Or even all the stuff which starts with #

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    Difference between structured and non-structured... The way I remember it, if a language has begin/end clauses, whether expressed in such key words, or punctuation like brackets, it's structured. That is, there are clear blocks of code which isolate execution to within them.

    Unstructured would be the old BASIC which had line numbers... It was allowable to GOTO any line from any line. There was no concept of structure. Unless the programmer imposes their own by keeping execution in segregated areas, vs. "spaghetti code".

    I don't know of any current unstructured languages in current use today. Maybe Perl ... I find it pretty awful, but that may be more in the way programmers are all over the place there.

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