Decimal to 16 bit unsigned?

This is a discussion on Decimal to 16 bit unsigned? within the C Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; I can't seem to find any tutorial on the web that explains how to convert a decimal to a 16 ...

  1. #1
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    Decimal to 16 bit unsigned?

    I can't seem to find any tutorial on the web that explains how to convert a decimal to a 16 bit unsigned binary integer and vice versa done with hand.

  2. #2
    and the Hat of Guessing tabstop's Avatar
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    Do you know what "binary" means -- as in, powers of two? If so, then you're done.

  3. #3
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_numeral_system

    It may not explain precisely how to do this for a 16-bit number, but the principle that you apply is the same regardless of number of bits.

    --
    Mats
    Compilers can produce warnings - make the compiler programmers happy: Use them!
    Please don't PM me for help - and no, I don't do help over instant messengers.

  4. #4
    Banned master5001's Avatar
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    I think I understand the question, so let me reask his question in a non-uninformed way:

    Quote Originally Posted by blurx
    Greetings C Programming.com patrons,

    I am wondering if someone knows how to convert a 16-bit scalar into a binary string by hand. Any links or input would be greatly appreciated.

    -blurx
    Well blurx, that is not a hard thing to do at all, actually. Here is some sample code, since you formulated your question in such a cordial way:

    Example:
    Code:
    void int16tobstr(short x, char s[17])
    {
      int bit;
    
      for(bit = 0; bit < 16; ++bit)
        *s++ = '0' + !!(x & (1 << bit));
     *s = 0;
    }

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    I realized that it was just more powers of 2, since I got confused with 16 digits compared to 8.

  6. #6
    Banned master5001's Avatar
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    16 digits means you were dealing with a 16bit number. 32 digits means a 32 bit number. So when someone says a 64-bit number, that means that its binary digits could be quantified as 64.

    Binary digIT is what a bit is anyhow. So now some information you have in your brain is going to go full circle

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