Borland Turbo C++ 3.0 config

This is a discussion on Borland Turbo C++ 3.0 config within the C Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hi everyone. I'm using Borland Turbo C++ 3.0. I wrote some code for beginning to test this compiler functionality. When ...

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    Borland Turbo C++ 3.0 config

    Hi everyone. I'm using Borland Turbo C++ 3.0. I wrote some code for beginning to test this compiler functionality. When I go to Main Menu -> Run, it doesn't show my program running, it turns the screen all black instead and then returns to the editor. If I press ALT-F5 (user screen option) while the screen is fully black, then I can see my program running, but it's like it add all strings that I have sent to the console (with printf) in later executions (wich I didn't actually see them before I pressed ALT-F5). Since I was developing with C, I use Dev-C++. I never used another compiler besides of that. I installed this software yesterday and didn't changed any option from default configuration besides of some directories path for my files. I think that it may be a trouble about configure the enviroment properly to see .exe files running on the screen.
    If anyone can help me, or at least have a clue about a solution, I'd be really greateful.
    Regards.

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    Registered User Codeplug's Avatar
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    My suggestion is not to use it at all. It's older than dirt (for a compiler) and there are plenty of other free, modern compilers.

    gg

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    Wich one do you recommend?. I'm working in windows. I need a compiler wich allows me working with the screen (conio.h, windows.h) and also with databases. I know that Borland Turbo C++ doesn't have sql.h file, but I was told that there's a way to install it (wich I haven't found yet). You all see that I have no restrictions for changing the compiler I'll work with, since I didn't start learning to handle any different compiler from Dev-C++ at all.
    I really don't know what would be the best choice, and hope you can help me on this.
    Thanks in advance.

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    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Visual Studio Express. Comes with PCH. Makes your life easier when working with Windows.h.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    What's PCH? and what about sql.h? does it support it or will I have to install it (some way, some how)?. Thanks for your reply.
    Last edited by mariano_donati; 04-22-2008 at 06:03 AM. Reason: To ask one more question

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    In this particular case, PCH stands for Pre-Compiled Headers - it's also short for Pacific Coast Highway for example, but that makes no sense in Elysia's comment.

    I'm personally not a great fan of Pre-compiled headers, but that's up to you.

    What does make sense is to use a compiler that actually supports Windows well - and whilst Turbo C allows you to compile windows executables, I would say that it's not exactly "state of the art" when it comes to compatibility with standards and functionality you expect from a modern compiler.

    Also, I'm 90% sure that conio.h only works in DOS-mode, which in turn means that you can't actually use chunks of memory that are bigger than 64KB - which may restrict your ability to work with databases - at least if the database contains a fair amount of data.

    --
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    Please don't PM me for help - and no, I don't do help over instant messengers.

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    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    PCH is a great feature that allows the compiler to pre-compile certain headers. That means every time you build your project, it won't have to re-parse all those headers, which can significantly speed up compile time, especially with big headers such as Windows.h which includes a multi-tude of other headers.
    Visual Studio is also a great IDE in sense that it has a great debugger and is a very feature rich IDE.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    Woof, woof! zacs7's Avatar
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    Nothing beats cmake, vi and gdb

    Not a fan of VS, however I do think it's very nice (so long as I'm not using it ) -- give it a whirl you'll probably like it.

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    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    The nice thing with Visual Studio is that it's a professional tool aimed at professional developers. As such, it has many very nice functions including debugging without having to type anything in a command line aka gdb.
    No need to remember commands and much faster than typing if you need to. Also has very nice features such as hovering over a variable allows you to see all the contents of it. If it's a class, you can browse through its members, for example. If it's a linked list, you can browse through your next/prev pointers in infinity to see if the list is intact.
    Not to mention you can set data breakpoints which allows the debugger to break if a certain memory location was read/written or changed in any way, including a condition as to when it should break if an abovementioned event happens.
    Of course it works with line breakpoints as well, which allows you to break on a specific line, and include a conidition to break if, say, i == 50 (useful to break after X amount of loops in a loop, for example).
    It also includes a memory viewer to monitor what is happening to memory. That's useful, too, sometimes.
    There's a lot in Visual Studio.

    Now, while gdb and GCC is free, it is not a child's tool or an amateur's tool. It can be used as a professional tool, as well, but Visual Studio was developed specifically towards professional developers while gdb was not - it was designed for everyone.
    That is also not to say command lines are not for professionals - but in Windows, GUIs are often considered more productive than command lines unless they are used for a specific purpose. We could go on about that forever, though...
    Now I'd like to see gdb beat that
    Last edited by Elysia; 04-22-2008 at 06:58 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    The nice thing with Visual Studio is that it's a professional tool aimed at professional developers. As such, it has many very nice functions including debugging without having to type anything in a command line aka gdb.
    If you did not notice, you are implying that only amateur developers use the command line or develop command line oriented tools.
    C + C++ Compiler: MinGW port of GCC
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    Look up a C++ Reference and learn How To Ask Questions The Smart Way

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    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    My bad. Visual Studio was aimed at professional developers, while gdb is aimed at everyone, not limited to just one. It is in no way just an amateur tool.
    Command line tools have their uses, but in Windows environment, everyone works (mostly) with GUIs if it can be helped.
    Gdb isn't bad, but seeing as it's developed under linux environment (I think), it's command line. Most things that are developed under linux seems to do. It's like a trend, from what I understand. But I am no linux dev, so what I see may vary from the actual truth.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  12. #12
    Woof, woof! zacs7's Avatar
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    > Visual Studio was aimed at professional developers, while gdb is aimed at everyone,
    Yes... that explains VS Express. Not.

    > Now I'd like to see gdb beat that
    There are a few GUI front-ends to gdb, valgrind etc. No-one says you have to use the CLI...

    > It's like a trend, from what I understand.
    Usually, however it's an advantage as far as I'm concerned (I have a Linux box in my cupboard I use for compiling/cross-compiling, debugging, svn, etc). And there's usually GUI front-ends to most of the tools.
    Last edited by zacs7; 04-22-2008 at 03:37 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elysia View Post
    Now, while gdb and GCC is free, it is not a child's tool or an amateur's tool. It can be used as a professional tool, as well, but Visual Studio was developed specifically towards professional developers while gdb was not - it was designed for everyone.
    Visual Studio is also free. Well, the "express" version at least.
    If you can get a professional tool for free, why bother with others?

    As for Pre-compiled Headers... If they're enabled, the first thing I do is disable them. They always @#$! up my builds!

  14. #14
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cpjust View Post
    Visual Studio is also free. Well, the "express" version at least.
    If you can get a professional tool for free, why bother with others?
    I think it's great that you can get a professional tool for free since they do tend to be expensive and usually good!

    As for Pre-compiled Headers... If they're enabled, the first thing I do is disable them. They always @#$! up my builds!
    Doesn't that mean you just don't know how to use them? I never had a problem with them, or very few at the least.

    Though I might add:
    With Visual Studio being a "professional" tool, I mean that it is very feature rich, has a very good debugger, etc. Professional as in much features. It doesn't mean it's better than anything else. It just means that it was developed for professional developers in mind - to meet their needs.
    GDB and the rest was developed for free for all programms, so their aim isn't quite the same, but that doesn't mean the functionality isn't there. It's a matter of preferance in most cases.

    I'm not willing to let this turn into a flame war
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elysia View Post
    Doesn't that mean you just don't know how to use them? I never had a problem with them, or very few at the least.
    Maybe in the later VC++ versions it works better, but in this damn VC++ 6.0 it just barfs.

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