How good...

This is a discussion on How good... within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; The point is that using C# or Java (or Visual Basic.NET for that matter) lets you get accustomed to and ...

  1. #16
    Meow Pendragon's Avatar
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    The point is that using C# or Java (or Visual Basic.NET for that matter) lets you get accustomed to and comfortable with concepts without having to put too much thought into the intricacies of the language. Learning to write software has very little at first to do with the language itself. Once you have learned the concepts (OO etc) you *should* be able to apply these to other languages and, if you choose to learn C++, you (theoretically) already know how to program so you can concentrate on learning to use the language.

    Also, you seem to imply that C++ is somehow "better" than C#. It's not. You don't have to have an in-depth knowledge of C++ to be a good software engineer. It has its uses (exclusive and passive) certainly one of which being having a understanding of the inner workings of C#/JavaVM/VB.NET; but it's not the 'ultimate goal' of software development for all areas of development... and is certainly not a gentle introduction to the business.
    Last edited by Pendragon; 12-14-2007 at 02:10 AM.

  2. #17
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    It's a difficult subject and everyone has their opinions. What might actually just be the best idea is to try it yourself and see what works best for you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pendragon View Post
    The point is that using C# or Java (or Visual Basic.NET for that matter) lets you get accustomed to and comfortable with concepts without having to put too much thought into the intricacies of the language. Learning to write software has very little at first to do with the language itself. Once you have learned the concepts (OO etc) you *should* be able to apply these to other languages and, if you choose to learn C++, you (theoretically) already know how to program so you can concentrate on learning to use the language.
    There's a little problem with that analogy.
    Programming is an art - especially so with C++ since of all its functions it gives you. In the end, it gives the same result, but with the code, you must design it according to your wishes and at the same time make sure it's easy to read, understand works well, easy to maintain, does what you want to do, etc. So it's an art. Just because you learn VB before C++ doesn't mean you can a good program in C++. You probably wouldn't do well at all. I know this one well since I started with VB and got confused with C++. No. You must learn the language, the art, first. Then you can do your programs. This part is what you'll have to re-learn with every new language you do.

    Also, you seem to imply that C++ is somehow "better" than C#. It's not. You don't have to have an in-depth knowledge of C++ to be a good software engineer. It has its uses (exclusive and passive) certainly one of which being having a understanding of the inner workings of C#/JavaVM/VB.NET; but it's not the 'ultimate goal' of software development for all areas of development... and is certainly not a gentle introduction to the business.
    In my opinion, yes, it's far better than anything C# will ever be. But that's beside the point. C# has a strong point, just as C++ does.
    But then again, C++ can do something that C# can never do - performance and control.
    C# can do good GUI and quickly, but C++ can do GUI too, just maybe not so easily and quick.
    Take your pick.
    Last edited by Elysia; 12-14-2007 at 04:00 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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