Recommend a book.

This is a discussion on Recommend a book. within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; Originally Posted by Happy_Reaper You a climber, cheez ? So I finished Into Thin Air last night, and Krakauer spends ...

  1. #16
    Mayor of Awesometown Govtcheez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    8,825
    Quote Originally Posted by Happy_Reaper View Post
    You a climber, cheez ?
    So I finished Into Thin Air last night, and Krakauer spends about 15-20 pages ripping on DeWalt and saying that a lot of the stuff he wrote about was fabricated. From what I gather, DeWalt seems really interested in defending Boukreev by any means necessary, even if it means butchering quotes from people and paiting Krakauer as some sort of a hit artist (something I didn't get from Into Thin Air at all). I'm not sure I want to read The Climb because of it, but I probably will in the interest of seeing (DeWalt's version of ) Boukreev's story.

    For now I am moving on to Baseball Between the Numbers. After that I'd like to try and tackle Morris's biographies of Teddy Roosevelt again. I read half of the first one last summer, couldn't put it down for a week, and then just stopped. I don't know why.

  2. #17
    Fear the Reaper...
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    625
    So I finished Into Thin Air last night, and Krakauer spends about 15-20 pages ripping on DeWalt and saying that a lot of the stuff he wrote about was fabricated. From what I gather, DeWalt seems really interested in defending Boukreev by any means necessary, even if it means butchering quotes from people and paiting Krakauer as some sort of a hit artist (something I didn't get from Into Thin Air at all). I'm not sure I want to read The Climb because of it, but I probably will in the interest of seeing (DeWalt's version of ) Boukreev's story.
    Well I haven't finished the whole thing yet, but I haven't seen DeWalt particularly rip into Krakauer yet. It does portray him as a typical media type, though, thinking that the guides would lead him safely to the top without him having to do any effort. But from what Boukreev said, that was the general feeling for many of the expedition members. Boukreev, I think, never really felt comfortable with the expedition.

    I would agree, as well, that he does seem to defend Boukreev quite a bit, often times almost to a fault. But considering what he did, it's hard to really push guilt onto him.

    What did Krakauer think of Boukreev ?
    Teacher: "You connect with Internet Explorer, but what is your browser? You know, Yahoo, Webcrawler...?" It's great to see the educational system moving in the right direction

  3. #18
    Mayor of Awesometown Govtcheez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    8,825
    He questions Boukreev going down before the group and says that in general he stayed too far away from the people he was supposed to be guiding. He also criticized him for not using supplemental oxygen as a guide (there are a lot of quotes from other guides saying basically the same thing).

    However, he does say that Anatoli was basically singlehandedly responsible for rescuing the people stuck on the South Col.

    He doesn't particularly blame Boukreev for anything, but he does make it sound like Boukreev's actions weren't particularly "guidelike" and that there are quite a few holes in his story. There's plenty of blame to go around, and Anatoli's not singled out for any more of it than Fischer or Hall or Lopsang or anyone. The only people he really rips into are the Taiwanese and South African expeditions.

    This is the only thing I've read about the events, so I'm looking at it through Krakauer's eyes, but it does seem weird that DeWalt is so quick to jump all over Krakauer as a "typical media type" when Krakauer was an accomplished climber and DeWalt wasn't even there.

  4. #19
    Fear the Reaper...
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    625
    It's probably because he sees it through Boukreev's eyes. Krakauer, if I remember correctly, was at first supposed to go with Boukreev and Fischer's expedition, but at some point, the mag he was writing for (Outdoors, I think) decided to switch into Rob Hall's expedition. Whether that was Krakauer's decision or not, I don't know, but he left their expedition for a more "famous" one, so to Fischer and his team, it probably looked like he was going for show.

    As for the supplemental oxygen, the Mountain Madness expedition was extremely lacking in oxygen canisters even before their bid for the top. They'd started with a very tight supply at the outset, and then one of their Sherpa's had gone down with HEMA at camp 2 and had used a couple there. Then one of their clients, Pete Schoeling, came down with the same thing. Once they reached camp 4, there was barely enough for the clients. There's even a quote from Boukreev saying that, although he was intending to go without supplemental, that he'd asked Fischer for 2 "just in case" canisters. Fischer only nodded and said "we'll see" (or something along those lines).
    Although he ended up getting the canisters he wanted, both Boukreev and Beidelman (the other guide) went up with no Os. Even Fischer (who was already in pretty bad shape), had to be convinced to take some with him. In the end, Boukreev never really used the oxygen. He ended up giving one to Beidelman, and then one to Pittman, I believe.

    That being said, I do agree that Boukreev seemed in quite a bit of a rush to get back. I remember him supplying a reason for that, but I also remember thinking that it wasn't really all that good.

    And again, I see these things through Boukreev's eyes, so its hard to get an unbiased position.
    Teacher: "You connect with Internet Explorer, but what is your browser? You know, Yahoo, Webcrawler...?" It's great to see the educational system moving in the right direction

  5. #20
    Mayor of Awesometown Govtcheez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    8,825
    > Krakauer, if I remember correctly, was at first supposed to go with Boukreev and Fischer's expedition, but at some point, the mag he was writing for (Outdoors, I think) decided to switch into Rob Hall's expedition.

    Yeah, if I remember right they put him in Hall's because of the extra publicity.

    > I remember him supplying a reason for that, but I also remember thinking that it wasn't really all that good.

    Supposedly he had a conversation with Fischer where Fischer told him to go down, but no one else witnessed it. DeWalt claims Fischer told the Base Camp Manager about it, but she says he made brief mention of it a couple weeks before the ascent and no one brought it up after that.

    I don't remember the stuff about where supplemental oxygen was doled out, but I've probably just forgotten. I'll check and see later

    > And again, I see these things through Boukreev's eyes, so its hard to get an unbiased position.

    Likewise.

  6. #21
    aoeuhtns
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    581
    Jennifer Government by Max Barry. It's just enjoyable to read.
    There are 10 types of people in this world, those who cringed when reading the beginning of this sentence and those who salivated to how superior they are for understanding something as simple as binary.

  7. #22
    Registered User Utopus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    beautiful place
    Posts
    26
    I like reading classic Russian literatures, such as works by Leo Tolstoy and Feodor Dostoevsky.
    And I like Tolstoy's "War and Peace" most; however, I suggest watching the movie of it first by Audrey Hepburn and Henry Fonda, then read the novel.

    Dostoevsky's "Crime and Punishment" is a fine novel, too. It depicts about a man who have lost his meaning of life, and then in the end he'd find the meaning of life was to...

    Also, Thomas More's "Utopia", I loved it.
    Last edited by Utopus; 06-25-2007 at 09:00 PM.

  8. #23
    Registered User axon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    2,572
    Quote Originally Posted by Utopus View Post
    I like reading classic Russian literatures, such as works by Leo Tolstoy and Feodor Dostoevsky.
    And I like Tolstoy's "War and Peace" most; however, I suggest watching the movie of it first by Audrey Hepburn and Henry Fonda, then read the novel.

    Dostoevsky's "Crime and Punishment" is a fine novel, too. It depicts about a man who have lost his meaning of life, and then in the end he'd find the meaning of life was to...

    Also, Thomas More's "Utopia", I loved it.
    that's my kind of reading! Dosto is my all time favorite author.

    But if anyone wants to read the best 20th century American novel read The Invisible Man by Ellison. BTW the book is heavily inspired by Dostoevsky - especially Notes from the Underground. If anyone wants to talk about the above, let me know.

    Also, Jeremy recommended a book a few months ago that was great - Into the Wild by Krakauer. The book isn't written particularly well but the topic is fantastic, and I'm certain that many people on this board would benefit from reading it.

    [edit] ooops posted before reading the whole thread. I see that he mentioned it above [/edit]
    Last edited by axon; 06-25-2007 at 10:03 PM.

    some entropy with that sink? entropysink.com

    there are two cardinal sins from which all others spring: Impatience and Laziness. - franz kafka

  9. #24
    Captain Crash brewbuck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    7,239
    Quote Originally Posted by Happy_Reaper View Post
    No kidding ? I'm currently reading "the Climb" by Anatoli Boukreev which is about the same thing. Real good stuff.
    There is/was a very large controversy around the events of that year. Boukreev and Krakauer's accounts differ in some very important ways. Much of the purpose of both books, just my opinion, was to assuage the respective writers' guilt over their roles in the event. In my opinion you absolutely have to read both, and even then, I don't think anybody who wasn't there themselves will ever have a completely accurate picture of what happened.

    <sometimes mountain climber>

  10. #25
    the hat of redundancy hat nvoigt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Hannover, Germany
    Posts
    3,139
    Fatherland by Robert Harris.

    Quote Originally Posted by Amazon
    It is twenty years after Nazi Germany's triumphant victory in World War II and the entire country is preparing for the grand celebration of the FÜhrer's seventy-fifth birthday, as well as the imminent peacemaking visit from President Kennedy.

    Meanwhile, Berlin Detective Xavier March -- a disillusioned but talented investigation of a corpse washed up on the shore of a lake. When a dead man turns out to be a high-ranking Nazi commander, the Gestapo orders March off the case immediately. Suddenly other unrelated deaths are anything but routine.

    Now obsessed by the case, March teams up with a beautiful, young American journalist and starts asking questions...dangerous questions. What they uncover is a terrifying and long-concealed conspiracy of such astonding and mind-numbing terror that is it certain to spell the end of the Third Reich -- if they can live long enough to tell the world about it.
    The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde plus it's 3 sequels

    Quote Originally Posted by New York Times
    A combination of fantasy, comedy, science fiction, Douglas Adams, Kurt Vonnegut, Lewis Carroll, Monty Python and even 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer'.
    This one is hard to describe. Hilarious. Fascinating. Great. You cannot really describe that firework of ideas, you just have to read it.
    hth
    -nv

    She was so Blonde, she spent 20 minutes looking at the orange juice can because it said "Concentrate."

    When in doubt, read the FAQ.
    Then ask a smart question.

  11. #26
    User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    498
    Plague Maker by Tim Downs. An evil scientist is trying to kill the world's population by using the bubonic plague.

    [edit] And poor Salem is going to have to choose from this ever-growing list. Let's hope that the token is worth a lot. ;-)
    Last edited by joeprogrammer; 06-28-2007 at 04:48 PM.

  12. #27
    {Jaxom,Imriel,Liam}'s Dad Kennedy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    1,065
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    I've got some book token type things to spend, and I'm looking for some good books to splash out on.

    Any topic you like - just so long as you've read it and thought that was a good read.
    Kushiel's Dart by Jacqueline Carey. Very good story of conspiracy and how one person can make a difference. . . and quite sexy. The series is 6 or 8 books long (I think she's writing number 7 right now).

  13. #28
    In the Land of Diddly-Doo g4j31a5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    476
    Quote Originally Posted by divineleft View Post
    the dune series by frank herbert is very awesome science fiction / philosophy
    I agree.

    Some books / novels that I've read and recommend are:
    1. Dune (Frank Herbert): Where sci-fi meets philosophy. Been a fan for anything Dune.
    2. Taiko & Musashi (Eiji Yoshikawa): Semi biographical books on 2 Japanese figure. One is about Toyotomi Hideyoshi , and the other about Miyamoto Musashi
    3. Dark Elf Trilogy (R.A. Salvatore): I just like the anti hero type of character like Drizzt Do'urden.
    ERROR: Brain not found. Please insert a new brain!

    “Do nothing which is of no use.” - Miyamoto Musashi.

  14. #29
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    11
    I'm a big fan of Goethe and Mann. But I really don't know you personally so it would be hard to make a decent recommendation. If German literature isn't your cup of tea, or if you just want something less dense, I'd try Nabokov.

  15. #30
    verbose cat
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    209
    The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher is a good series. There are 9 books in the series so far (I'm on #8 now, "Proven Guilty"). The first book is "Storm Front" if you want to start at the beginning. It's a very cowboy-ish storyline, centered around a modern day wizard trying to make a living as a Private Eye. The magic/mythos is excellently done, and Dresden deals with so many different things, from werewolves to demons, faerie, vampires, and a whole lot more. If you've seen the Dresden Files on Sci-Fi, it is very much like the Harry Potter movies vs. the books, but the tv show had some plotlines that weren't in the books thus far. Dresden is also very tongue-in-cheek. There have been some one-liners within the context of the stories that made me drop the books from the laughter.

    I liked the Kusheil's series a lot as well. Kushiel's Dart took me a bit to get into, but once I did and became familiar with the characters, I couldn't put the books down.
    abachler: "A great programmer never stops optimizing a piece of code until it consists of nothing but preprocessor directives and comments "

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

Similar Threads

  1. Is this book <JAVA in a netshell> good for C++ programmers?
    By meili100 in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10-28-2008, 02:28 AM
  2. Recommend a book to me
    By storkus in forum C++ Programming
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-18-2008, 11:07 PM
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-12-2008, 11:06 AM
  4. book holders
    By scott27349 in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 02-15-2003, 01:42 PM

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21