starting a website

This is a discussion on starting a website within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; I have had a decent amount of experience with this sorta thing. ha GoDaddy.com is the way to go IMHO ...

  1. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    434
    I have had a decent amount of experience with this sorta thing. ha

    GoDaddy.com is the way to go IMHO and it's got a nice interface and all for uploading. Plus you can get MySQL stuff, as well as download something like SmartFTP for uploading (free).


    Good luck!
    "Anyone can aspire to greatness if they try hard enough."
    - Me

  2. #17
    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    21,442
    Just a possible warning about godaddy though: nodaddy. I have no experience using godaddy, so I definitely do not have any experience with godaddy suspending domain name registrations unfairly.

    Without PHP and SQL the only thing you can do is a lousy homepage...
    There are alternatives to PHP (and to SQL too, I suppose), and a "homepage" need not be "lousy" if it has good content within a good layout.
    C + C++ Compiler: MinGW port of GCC
    Version Control System: Bazaar

    Look up a C++ Reference and learn How To Ask Questions The Smart Way

  3. #18
    Lean Mean Coding Machine KONI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Luxembourg, Europe
    Posts
    444
    Quote Originally Posted by maxorator View Post
    Without PHP and SQL the only thing you can do is a lousy homepage...
    That's quite a statement and I'll challenge you on that right off the bat. I wonder what a server-side scripting language and information storage system could offer that makes a "good" homepage. They have absolutely NO influence on the content, the design, the usability, accessibility and ease of use (I could go on and on about this) and while it is true that PHP offers very advanced processing methods to dynamically create markup, it still only generates static websites.

    It will probably be a little more complicated to edit the html files manually each time and you can't do "advanced" things such as news on several pages (without it being a pain in the butt) but I am pretty sure that you can do VERY good websites without the use of any server-side scripting language. The content and design is still more important than the technical features of your site.

  4. #19
    Woof, woof! zacs7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    3,459
    Plus since this is a C/C++ forum, we *should* recommend C CGI to him

    And using PHP in small simple sites could be considered more of a problem than a benifit.

  5. #20
    Reverse Engineer maxorator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Estonia
    Posts
    2,318
    http://www.ixwebhosting.com
    No comments.
    Quote Originally Posted by KONI
    That's quite a statement and I'll challenge you on that right off the bat. I wonder what a server-side scripting language and information storage system could offer that makes a "good" homepage. They have absolutely NO influence on the content, the design, the usability, accessibility and ease of use (I could go on and on about this) and while it is true that PHP offers very advanced processing methods to dynamically create markup, it still only generates static websites.

    It will probably be a little more complicated to edit the html files manually each time and you can't do "advanced" things such as news on several pages (without it being a pain in the butt) but I am pretty sure that you can do VERY good websites without the use of any server-side scripting language. The content and design is still more important than the technical features of your site.
    It doesn't affect the design nor the content, but soon he'll want to make a dynamic site and then he'd need to switch hostings. That's why it is good to take a normal hosting right away.

    Let's make that "without PHP" to "without server-side scripting languages".
    Last edited by maxorator; 05-23-2007 at 07:51 AM.
    "The Internet treats censorship as damage and routes around it." - John Gilmore

  6. #21
    Registered User whiteflags's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    7,638
    It doesn't affect the design nor the content, but soon he'll want to make a dynamic site and then he'd need to switch hostings. That's why it is good to take a normal hosting right away.

    Let's make that "without PHP" to "without server-side scripting languages".
    How do you know that? Seriously. CGI only benefits a web site after their site has both an audience and content, because then your CGI experiments have a purpose; CGI can improve the user experience, among other uses. You shouldn't just throw CGI on every website because it provides different benefits depending on the content. And even then, it's still a decision to be made.

    Limited webhosting is certainly a valid option, slippy. It'll be a more wise expense to make when paid-hosting fits your needs, so I hope you don't waste your money.

    Did you ask your ISP if they offered you web hosting with your subscription? Since you paid for it anyway, you might as well use that at first.

  7. #22
    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    21,442
    vart does have a point though: a local web server could facilitate testing of webpages over HTTP without having to upload to a remote server until you are satisfied.

    I suggest using Apache for a webserver, then installing PHP and say MySQL (or enable PDO support and use SQLite) separately at some later point when you actually want to develop and test using such technology.
    C + C++ Compiler: MinGW port of GCC
    Version Control System: Bazaar

    Look up a C++ Reference and learn How To Ask Questions The Smart Way

  8. #23
    Reverse Engineer maxorator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Estonia
    Posts
    2,318
    Quote Originally Posted by laserlight
    I suggest using Apache for a webserver, then installing PHP and say MySQL (or enable PDO support and use SQLite) separately at some later point when you actually want to develop and test using such technology.
    Wampserver just includes the latest Apache, PHP and MySQL and a tray icon which you can use to start, stop, restart all of these services together, enable modules or plugins and much more. Less trouble, no loss in performance.
    "The Internet treats censorship as damage and routes around it." - John Gilmore

  9. #24
    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    21,442
    Wampserver just includes the latest Apache, PHP and MySQL and a tray icon which you can use to start, stop, restart all of these services together, enable modules or plugins and much more. Less trouble, no loss in performance.
    On the other hand, one now relies on the maintainer of such a third party package to keep updated, and learns nothing about how to configure them in the absence of such combined packages.
    C + C++ Compiler: MinGW port of GCC
    Version Control System: Bazaar

    Look up a C++ Reference and learn How To Ask Questions The Smart Way

  10. #25
    Woof, woof! zacs7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    3,459
    I don't think he wants to host his own website!?

    But if he did, Installing PHP & SQL would be wise, just incase you wanted mess around with stuff or install some sort of 3rd party script.

  11. #26
    Caution: Wet Floor
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    55
    I don't think he wants to host his own website!?

    But if he did, Installing PHP & SQL would be wise, just incase you wanted mess around with stuff or install some sort of 3rd party script.
    Ok, I'm getting the idea now!

    I found a registrar, but they want resource records for a

    "zone file."

    A what????

    In any case, they said you need to specify a record to bind your nameserver to the web address. So I surfed the web and found something like

    Code:
                    IN            NS            dns1.example.com
    dns1	IN	A	NNN.NNN.NNN.NNN
    NNN.NNN.NNN.NNN would be the IP address of yahoo briefcase?

    Now things are getting confusing again!

  12. #27
    Math wizard
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    582
    When you sign up for webhosting, you are given the nameserver information. If you host using a different company than the domain name registrar, you'll need to log in to your domain name registrar, find the area that allows you to set the nameserver, then use some copy paste for inserting the data as needed. It'll take a few hours to even 3 days for this change to propagate through the internet. Until then, you can only use a direct IP address to access your website and transfer files.
    High elevation is the best elevation. The higher, the better the view!
    My computer: XP Pro SP3, 3.4 GHz i7-2600K CPU (OC'd to 4 GHz), 4 GB DDR3 RAM, X-Fi Platinum sound, GeForce 460, 1920x1440 resolution, 1250 GB HDD space, Visual C++ 2008 Express

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

Similar Threads

  1. How's my new Website
    By asbo60 in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 53
    Last Post: 07-10-2009, 10:10 AM
  2. Interpreter.c
    By moussa in forum C Programming
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-28-2008, 05:59 PM
  3. Starting a website?
    By IfYouSaySo in forum Tech Board
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 03-26-2005, 01:43 AM

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21