What's a good generalized data structures book?

This is a discussion on What's a good generalized data structures book? within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; I have one for java which is pretty general despite being based around java for my Data structures class, I ...

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    What's a good generalized data structures book?

    I have one for java which is pretty general despite being based around java for my Data structures class, I could transfer it to C++ easily (as I do for some assignments), but is there a good generalized book for data structures that you'd recommend that doesn't focus on any specific language?

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    Code Goddess Prelude's Avatar
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    Knuth, The Art of Computer Programming. That should keep you entertained for a few decades.
    My best code is written with the delete key.

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    Let's see how long my attention impaired self holds up to this torture.

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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    pretty nice., thanks.

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    Moderately Rabid Decrypt's Avatar
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    Whatever you do, do NOT get C++ Data Structures by Roberge, Brandle, and Whittington.

    We're using it this semester, and I can't stand it. I think a lot of that has to do with the code they provide for the labs - it's buggy and some of it's non-standard.
    *scowls* Just a few more weeks....
    There is a difference between tedious and difficult.

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    Registered User jlou's Avatar
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    Sedgewick's Algorithms in C++ is generally highly recommended. It helped me and I liked it quite a bit.

    http://www.amazon.com/Algorithms-C++.../dp/0201350882

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    Code Goddess Prelude's Avatar
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    >Sedgewick's Algorithms in C++ is generally highly recommended.
    Beware the code though. He's a smart guy, but when it comes to programming, he's not exactly the sharpest knife in the drawer...if you know what I mean.
    My best code is written with the delete key.

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    That doesn't sound good, when the material is indeed for programming

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    Registered User jlou's Avatar
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    I have to admit I didn't use his code, I usually wrote my own based on the algorithms in there. I also don't remember that code one way or another, so I can't comment on it.

    You wanted a data structures book that doesn't focus on a specific language (wow, I recommended Algorithms in C++ ), so bad code shouldn't matter as much as the theory and explanation.

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    true, but I have a book that does the same, and if it provides algorithms I would think that if it focuses on C++ it would give those algorithms in C++ rather than a generalised language. Unless it gives both, then I wouldn't mind.

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    Code Goddess Prelude's Avatar
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    >That doesn't sound good, when the material is indeed for programming
    I recommend his books because the explanations are excellent. If you have the patience, you can beat the code examples into something presentable that actually works, but keep in mind that they tend not to work when copied straight and they're filled with great examples of awful practices. That's not necessarily a bad thing. I learned quite a bit about red black trees by fixing his broken code.
    My best code is written with the delete key.

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    "Concepts in Data Structures and Software Development"

    http://www.amazon.com/Concepts-Data-.../dp/0314774602
    System: Debian Sid and FreeBSD 7.0. Both with GCC 4.3.

    Useful resources:
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