Why you like programming?

This is a discussion on Why you like programming? within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; Those ones go away so fast! Everyone wants them! Just as well we don't ever run out of them. The ...

  1. #16
    The superhaterodyne twomers's Avatar
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    Those ones go away so fast! Everyone wants them! Just as well we don't ever run out of them. The 2x1's are memory, right? I never knew lego had functions! Recursion! STL! Pointers and templates. Wow. I'm impressed.


    >> > I can't imagine what my life would be without programming...
    I misread that to not have the my initially. Mario paints a bleak picture. Make it more like my sig!
    Last edited by twomers; 09-20-2006 at 10:31 AM.

  2. #17
    Registered User jlou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Govtcheez
    You need one of those 2x1 blocks
    ... in red! I can't finish this dang chimney until I find one.


    I like programming because the challenges it provides are ones that I enjoy facing. Logic, problem solving, attention to detail, and stuff like that. I also like it because it provides a living for me and my family. If it didn't, I'd find a different job and probably wouldn't be programming at all.

  3. #18
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    One of the few things in life that I understand.

  4. #19
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    > Mario paints a bleak picture.

    I do I do. Soon all of you will too. Muahaha!

    EDIT: I feel I need a disclaimer though. I like programming. I love it. I just don't like do it for a living.
    Last edited by Mario F.; 09-20-2006 at 11:06 AM.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  5. #20
    Mayor of Awesometown Govtcheez's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F.
    >It's not the paradise you are probably lead to believe unless that passion sticks to you when the real problems start to occur. Like being forced to program when you don't want to, program things you don't want to, program against the clock when all you want is to get some sleep, program against a background of shouting from your boss, program with other people that don't necessarily feel the same way about it as you... etc...
    That's not how the real world works! Everyone knows once you get a CS degree, you get put in a darkened room with an unlimited supply of Mountain Dew and get to work on whatever you want! You don't even have to finish it!

    There's no way you're telling the truth. In your horrible dystopia of a world, people do what their supervisor says they have to do, even if it's something stupid like embedding macros into a spreadsheet. They're also given totally unrealistic deadlines by people who have no idea what sort of work actually goes into making a functional and useful program. I refuse to believe in this web of lies!

  6. #21
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    Sometime near the middle of my first college degree, I realized that what I really wanted to do was play chess professionally. Then after devoting too much time to chess, and skipping too many marketing classes, I realized that I would probably never be good enough to be pro, and even if I was, it didn't pay. So I finished my lame degree, did an internship, and couldn't get hired anywhere because...I lacked computer skills. I was ........ed off, and I set about to make things right, and tried to learn as much as possible about computers. Along the way I stumbled across pascal, then c, and I wrote some pretty cool programs even before I had taken any classes (I thought they were pretty cool at least). I fell in love with it because it was the closest profession to chess that I had seen (decision making, problem solving, evaluating trade-offs) and it pays pretty damn good also. So I went back and got a second degree...
    The crows maintain that a single crow could destroy the heavens. Doubtless this is so. But it proves nothing against the heavens, for the heavens signify simply: the impossibility of crows.

  7. #22
    Reverse Engineer maxorator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F.
    > I can't imagine what my life would be without programming...

    You are 14, right?

    Personally I find that statement very disturbing at your age max. Don't take me wrong.
    But really... just put a lot of consideration into that. There a lot more to life than programming for pete's sake. Especially at you age!
    Heck, I'm 36 (which is considered young by many standards) and I want out!

    It's not the paradise you are probably lead to believe unless that passion sticks to you when the real problems start to occur. Like being forced to program when you don't want to, program things you don't want to, program against the clock when all you want is to get some sleep, program against a background of shouting from your boss, program with other people that don't necessarily feel the same way about it as you... etc...

    Then, if you come out of that unharmed every single day from Monday to Friday and still feel invigorated enough... then you will be one of the very few in the world who really can say "I don't know what my life would be without programming".
    That means I'm lucky to be this young. I can learn very much before having any problems.

  8. #23
    Mayor of Awesometown Govtcheez's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxorator
    That means I'm lucky to be this young. I can learn very much before having any problems.
    That's a very good attitude to have. If you learn enough before you get into a real job, it'll make things a lot easier to deal with in pressure situations.

  9. #24
    Its hard... But im here swgh's Avatar
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    Ok, my answer is I love games. I started to learn C after I left school in 1997. I learnt as much C as I could then moved to C++, which I am still learning. I love programming, it expands my mind and really makes me think about real objects I see outside. If I am walking around and see like, say a cat, I think of what data member a cat class could have. say age, weight, name, height ect. I moved into more advanced C++ two years ago and am pleased I changed languages. Do not get me wrong, I am not knocking C, it is a great structured language, and it got me into right into C++ really easily. If I am writing a game, the only C code I might inherit is a struct for a non-method class. And, lwearning pointers was a breeze as I knew it from C.

    To sum up, I program not beacuse I have to, it is beacause I choose to. I love it, and would not swap it for anything. If I ever want to work for a games company, I need all the experience I can get my hands on. And C++ is a valuable tool to any proffesional game programmer

  10. #25
    For Narnia! Sentral's Avatar
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    I can't believe no one said this.... "I like it because you can finally order your piece of **** computer around!"

  11. #26
    System Novice siavoshkc's Avatar
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    I don't know why I love it. My brain is built for it.
    Last edited by siavoshkc; 09-20-2006 at 03:47 PM.
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  12. #27
    The Richness... Richie T's Avatar
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    I don't - I think that's apparent by now
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  13. #28
    The superhaterodyne twomers's Avatar
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    >> Also using SuSE 10.1 Linux with GCC 4.1.1 for "fun"

    ... erm ... sure you don't love it

  14. #29
    Slave MadCow257's Avatar
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    I used to love programming, but now I don't...

    I use it mainly just when I need something that someone else hasn't already made (small little utilities or algorithm testing)

    Honestly, I program more at school then I do at home now

  15. #30
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    I'm very good at problem solving, and I tend to be very creative(CS major, Visual Arts minor).

    I originally became interesting in programming because of games, but then I realized that's a 1 in a million shot, and so I started just programming to learn about programming. I like where that's going, so I'll stick with it for now.

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