Now, wait a sec, How many planets are there?

This is a discussion on Now, wait a sec, How many planets are there? within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; > Well, if you read the link, , they're called plutonians or something. Plutons. But that's a different thing. It's ...

  1. #16
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    > Well, if you read the link, , they're called plutonians or something.

    Plutons. But that's a different thing. It's to name only objects that are near-like planets. It's part of this whole silly proposal.

    > Doesn't anything with any kind of gravity have an atmosphere?

    It depends on several factors. Definitely mass is the major one. But temperature plays a big role. Too much cold and the atmosphere freezes to the ground. Too much heat and it evaporates into space. "Too much" here being obviously a relative term depending on the type of atmosphere. Other factors that can take atmosphere away from a body are distance to the star and the type of star (a red giant will definitely consume the atmosphere of many of its planets).
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    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by twomers
    Isn't this a better definition - any celestial body (other than comets or satellites) that revolves around a star.
    So every asteroid whizzing around the sun is a planet? If not, please distinguish between a planet and an asteroid.
    If I did your homework for you, then you might pass your class without learning how to write a program like this. Then you might graduate and get your degree without learning how to write a program like this. You might become a professional programmer without knowing how to write a program like this. Someday you might work on a project with me without knowing how to write a program like this. Then I would have to do you serious bodily harm. - Jack Klein

  3. #18
    Slave MadCow257's Avatar
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    A planet need to be diverse. Most plutons are just balls of rock

  4. #19
    The superhaterodyne twomers's Avatar
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    >> Most plutons are just balls of rock
    And ice I think. But aren't planets, ie Earth, mostly balls of rock too (albeit molten rock)

  5. #20
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    I have two planets that.... ahhh forget it
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  6. #21
    The Richness... Richie T's Avatar
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    To get technical about it, I think that the criteria should be volume (note - not
    mass, due to the fact that other stellar phenomenon may prove quite dense),
    "atmosphere", and primarily, eccentricity of orbit - perhaps a range of values in
    which the orbit must be to be considered. Depending on the definition of
    atmosphere, a nice, well defined standard could be established which acounts
    for non planetary objects. Assuming that a large object with suitable volume
    and orbit but no atmosphere occurs, that could be considered a planetoid.
    The volume spec would rule out most asteroids, and the eccentricity
    would rule out comets.

    Those criteria could help standardise the naming of other bodies such as comets
    and asteroids, but at the end of the day, does having a standard name for
    objects that fall into specific categories really matter? When scientists talk about
    a comet, it'll be refered to by the name of the discoverer or some code, same for
    all objects really. When studying such objects, the type is less important than
    the values of the properties mentioned.

    Lastly, I think Charon is a proposed moon of Pluto? There's some ambiguity on
    that matter too I think.
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  7. #22
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    And then you would be removing from the definition of planet an object that, being a planet, would for instance have an eccentric orbit around the sun.

    No, the definition of an object must not be based solely on it's physical properties.
    Just like with the animal kingdom in which we so cleverly divided everything into ever so tighter compartments until we arrived onto the species, objects in space must probably be categorized a similar way. There won't be just one type of planet, but different "species" of planets. The same with asteroids and comets. In fact, this is what has been done with stars already.

    This is probably a saner and safer way to do it. There is also a big difference between how a planet (as we know it today) was formed and a comet or asteroid. This signature, just like with the animal kingdom, should be in the basis of what belongs or not to the planet "family".

    There is also the property of the planet being "alive" or not. Is there geological activity? Is there climate? Is there seasons? Is the planet evolving? Is there life? These and some other questions, individually analized or put together into groups may also help establish what is a planet, what is not, and what type of planet it is.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  8. #23
    and the Hat of Clumsiness GanglyLamb's Avatar
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    Aaah the human urge to categorize everything.

    A rock stays a rock, I can call it a balloon, it will remain the same object with the same characteristics.

    It's easy to have conventions/rules etc etc... Just like its easy to pick describing names for variables in code.

    But when conventions are being rearranged that there can be discussions about then the use of these conventions get lost.
    Last edited by GanglyLamb; 08-19-2006 at 06:31 AM.

  9. #24
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    I agree partially. But I think that reasoning comes from those situation where naming conventions don't fit the objects being categorized.

    The debate among the definition of a planet is old. Very old. Arguably the reason why a consensus has never been reached is because we don't know enough yet. We only know the planets of our solar system. We can theorize of how other planets may look like that are different from those in the solar system because we already kow something on how they are created and evolve until they either die "from natural causes" or are destroyed. But we certainly don't know enough yet to determine with a certain degree of precision what a planet is.

    We cannot deny the need to have a clearly categorized "fauna" of solar and extra-solar objects. The advantages go well beyond astronomy. The passing of knowledge, a better understanding of what surrounds us and simply the need to properly comunicate about these matters are some of the consequences of having things categorized. It is tue though that we make mistakes.

    In fact, it's never easy to name things. And the secular debate of what a planet is clearly shows this. As our undertanding grows, so does our perception of prior conventions. For the greeks a planet was simply a moving shiny object against the celestial sphere. Stars stayed put. Planets didn't. We cannot pretend we are above this need to categorize things. It is the only way, we humans know, of understanding them.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  10. #25
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Well, it's official. As of today, Pluto's no longer a planet.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  11. #26
    The superhaterodyne twomers's Avatar
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    My 6 year old nephew's gonna hate the scientests!!!!! He has a song to remember them and all!

  12. #27
    Yes, my avatar is stolen anonytmouse's Avatar
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    They should have grandfathered Pluto as a planet. Pluto is everyone's favourite planet/dog.

  13. #28
    l'Anziano DavidP's Avatar
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    Quote from the article:
    >Pluto was disqualified because its oblong orbit overlaps Neptune's.

    THAT'S why it was disqualified?!?!? Psh...we've known that for ages!

    I think a group of computer scientists should get together and decide if Pluto is a planet or not.
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  14. #29
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    It's quiet incomplete that article from Reuters. There were several other factors. But mainly the reason was that the definition of the word "planet" was redefined. The orbit was a major and important change.

    In oder to be considered a planet, the object must (along other restrictions) have cleared all other objects around its orbit path (and not be a satellite).

    This does indeed offer a more clear picture of what a planet is. I'm not sure what they are going to do with proto-planets and planets that have the needed mass to clear foreign objects around their path but haven't yet (didn't collide, captured or expelled those objects yet).

    But all in all, I believe this was a good thing. Especially on this age where the search for extra-solar planets is starting and thus a clear understanding of what is a planet becomes a clear necessity.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidP
    Quote from the article:
    >Pluto was disqualified because its oblong orbit overlaps Neptune's.

    THAT'S why it was disqualified?!?!? Psh...we've known that for ages!

    I think a group of computer scientists should get together and decide if Pluto is a planet or not.
    I never had to take natural science for my major.

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