GPL license: how does it cover the output of a program?

This is a discussion on GPL license: how does it cover the output of a program? within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; From my understanding of it, the anti proprietary / anti drm section is focussed on excluding drm / proprietary code ...

  1. #16
    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    From my understanding of it, the anti proprietary / anti drm section is focussed on excluding drm / proprietary code in gnu-gpl software, not on making output fall under the gnu-gpl.
    Yes, so the section that psychopath quoted has to do with cases when part of the program itself forms the output generated. I think none of us here are familiar enough with Q3Radiant and Quake3 BSP files to say something conclusive about this.

    I suspect that if templates are used here, they are just input data for Q3Radiant, so the output would not need to be licensed under the GPL.
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    Registered User Jaqui's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by laserlight
    Yes, so the section that psychopath quoted has to do with cases when part of the program itself forms the output generated. I think none of us here are familiar enough with Q3Radiant and Quake3 BSP files to say something conclusive about this.

    I suspect that if templates are used here, they are just input data for Q3Radiant, so the output would not need to be licensed under the GPL.
    yup, the gnu-gpl is designed to keep the software open source, not interfere with business use of the software. output, unless it includes the sources, [ not templates ] is not forced into any license. Templated output is not concidered as including the source code, since a template is only a format specification, not a required part of the software and generally is not licensed under then gnu-gpl, but is licensed under the lgpl. [ documentation license, allows for commercial use ]
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Henager
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