Java as a Main Language in College Won't Do Good

This is a discussion on Java as a Main Language in College Won't Do Good within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; Originally Posted by Govtcheez Hey Dean, what's up? Enjoying your return? You read my mind....

  1. #16
    &TH of undefined behavior Fordy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Govtcheez
    Hey Dean, what's up? Enjoying your return?
    You read my mind.

  2. #17
    I'm Not Coooool... tCrawford's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sean_mackrory
    And how does that relate to one language being more useful than another?

    I second that.

  3. #18
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    This has to be the strangest thread I have ever read.


    EDIT: And I want to know what type of college doesn't teach what a pointer is, or only how to use Java. Come on, if I wanted to learn how to use a single langauge I'd buy a book and save myself the tens of thousands of dollars.
    To code is divine

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    Registered User CompiledMonkey's Avatar
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    Wow, I wish all of that garbage would be removed so we could have a decent conversation on the topic.

    Personally, I agree on many parts of this article. I do feel like many schools "dumb down" their programs somewhat for business reasons. Lets face it, a University is still a business, and they're in it for money on many levels. If they don't have students, their budget goes down and can result in long term effects, so they have to cater to the students in many ways. Another downfall is the local University wanting to build relationships with local companies and recruiting firms. They think if they are all buddy-buddy with these people that it will help them at some point. So they tailor some of their coursework to these new found relationships. Quite a sad state of affairs if you ask me.

  5. #20
    unleashed alphaoide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CompiledMonkey
    Another downfall is the local University wanting to build relationships with local companies and recruiting firms. They think if they are all buddy-buddy with these people that it will help them at some point. So they tailor some of their coursework to these new found relationships. Quite a sad state of affairs if you ask me.
    Heh, there's probably much truth in that. Many companies around my school use C/C++ (e.g. They're in the field of defense, aviation, system, etc). And those companies have been actively coming down to our campus recruiting.

    Now I know why they made take that ADA class.
    source: compsci textbooks, cboard.cprogramming.com, world wide web, common sense

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    The school I went to had a lot of Aerospace companies near it, so we didn't have an option of which science to take. It was Physics I and II for everyone. Many schools let you choose between Biology, Chemistry, Physics, or even Geology.

    I also think the dumbing down takes place because of dumb or lazy professors. There is also a movement towards doing whole lectures with Powerpoint slides. And don't bother trying to write that down, the slides are available for download. The problem is, most people actually learn by writing the material down on paper. It also keeps you from spacing out too much in class. And if the professor is writing the notes or code or whatever on the board, you're pretty much guaranteed that they won't move faster than you can write the material down. It's all unfortunate. There are still a few good professors out there, but really the number is shrinking I think. Or maybe it was never a very big number in the first place...
    The crows maintain that a single crow could destroy the heavens. Doubtless this is so. But it proves nothing against the heavens, for the heavens signify simply: the impossibility of crows.

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    Another downfall is the local University wanting to build relationships with local companies and recruiting firms. They think if they are all buddy-buddy with these people that it will help them at some point. So they tailor some of their coursework to these new found relationships. Quite a sad state of affairs if you ask me.
    Are you serious?? You realize that the reason universities build good relationships with those companies is so that they hire their graduates! You do want a job after you graduate.... right?

  8. #23
    Registered User CompiledMonkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bithub
    Are you serious?? You realize that the reason universities build good relationships with those companies is so that they hire their graduates! You do want a job after you graduate.... right?
    I had a job well before I graduated. And yes, I do understand the reason companies do this, but not why you think it's ok for Universities to do this. For computer science, you need to be learning COMPUTER SCIENCE. Not something specific to your local area. If you want specific, go to ECPI. You'll have a job after you graduate that will get you 5 years down the road. Then, the next hot technology comes and you lose your job because you can't adapt.

  9. #24
    unleashed alphaoide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CompiledMonkey
    I had a job well before I graduated. And yes, I do understand the reason companies do this, but not why you think it's ok for Universities to do this. For computer science, you need to be learning COMPUTER SCIENCE. Not something specific to your local area. If you want specific, go to ECPI. You'll have a job after you graduate that will get you 5 years down the road. Then, the next hot technology comes and you lose your job because you can't adapt.
    So true (again). I have only one course in ASP.NET/C# but that's what my current job is in.
    source: compsci textbooks, cboard.cprogramming.com, world wide web, common sense

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