What is year 2038 bug?

This is a discussion on What is year 2038 bug? within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; I think according to Einstein there are 7 or something in the double-digits. Time is sometimes considered a 4th dimension....

  1. #61
    Me -=SoKrA=-'s Avatar
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    I think according to Einstein there are 7 or something in the double-digits. Time is sometimes considered a 4th dimension.
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  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by -=SoKrA=-
    Oh, C doesn't. It's POSIX who does. IIRC it needs to be an int. Therefore on 64bit machines it's 64.

    Altough I still have to figure out why it's 32 on my system, according to sizeof.
    Could it be caused by a 32bit OS?
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  3. #63
    Registered User Jaqui's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7smurfs
    Could it be caused by a 32bit OS?
    or, a lib compiled on a 32 bit os and used on a 64 bit machine.
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  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by ober
    Current? This won't happen for another 23 years!? Do you have any idea what has happened in the past 23? This will be as big of a problem as the Y2K thing was. (read: nothing will happen)
    The reason Y2K bugs did nothing was because everyone spent Trillions$$ fixing the problems before 2000 came around.

    I recall vividely saying in 1970 that the Y2K bugs were unimportant because nobody would be using our current software by then. WRONG! There were lots of people still using 30-year old programs by year 2000.

    So, when you write commercial programs today you need to be aware of the problems that might occur 30 years or more in the future because you may have to fix your own bugs like I did.

  5. #65
    Registered User major_small's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ancient Dragon
    I recall vividely saying in 1970 that the Y2K bugs were unimportant because nobody would be using our current software by then. WRONG! There were lots of people still using 30-year old programs by year 2000.
    this is something completely unrelated. the reason the Y2K bug was such a "big" thing was because programmers were using two zeros for years instead of four. this has to do with the size of the memory being used to store things, which will change within the next 30 years
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  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by major_small
    this is something completely unrelated.
    maybe yes, and maybe no. in 2038 will there be any programs running that were written in 2005? Not a lot, but probably some, and that was my point. Any program written today that uses time() functions will not work after 2038.

    You don't have to wait until 2038 to encounter the problem. Any program that uses time() can not be used to calculate dates beyond Tue Jan 19 03:14:07 2038.

    Here is one solution that can be used today with any compiler that supports _int64 data type.
    Last edited by Ancient Dragon; 09-04-2005 at 07:24 AM.

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuckY
    it is only impossible to accelerate to the speed of light, but you can travel at the speed of light.
    To travel at a certain speed, you must somehow reach it, no?
    Last edited by Sang-drax : Tomorrow at 02:21 AM. Reason: Time travelling

  8. #68
    Bob Dole for '08 B0bDole's Avatar
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    >To travel at a certain speed, you must somehow reach it, no?

    No, something could be traveling at a certain speed from the time it began to exis. Andromeda explains this pretty well :-p
    Hmm

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