Eternally Confuzzled

This is a discussion on Eternally Confuzzled within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; I prefer the fixed background (even though, like you said, it leads to a jerky scroll), but that background image ...

  1. #31
    Registered User major_small's Avatar
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    I prefer the fixed background (even though, like you said, it leads to a jerky scroll), but that background image is a bit harsh... it's a little too bright and distracts from the words on top of it... and it's especially annoying since it's always right in the middle of what you're reading :P

    and you really do need to do something about those code boxes... make them just a few shades darker or lighter than the background color and you should be fine... something like the boxes on these here forums:
    Code:
                    5
             3             7
         2       4     6       8
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  2. #32
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    No. xhtml/css standard is clear. Markup and presentation.
    Can you clarify what this means? Like if I use the <em> tag, it's supposed to add emphasis, but each browser defines this differently. For example, lynx might define emphasis as bold text, whereas IE might define emphasis as italics. Is the emphasis part of the presentation? I think so, but it's not about how something is presented, but how the user reacts

    Content and looks. css exists for some reason.
    When internet became popular by 93~94, there was a browser war about adding new html tags - anarky. Netscape introduces the font tag with size and color, later internet explorer introduced the font face attribute, and it was caos.
    OK, but no browser can determine what a font will look like exactly on the screen. For instance, my linux system might not have a true type font server or enabled X server, and my fonts will look jaggy. Another system need not even have the the right font. This is all notwithstanding each system interpreting the font tag the same way. Other visual things could be detailed.

  3. #33
    Registered User major_small's Avatar
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    I found something: first binary search tree page, paragraph about the save double pointer: you have *save (the 'e' isn't bolded)
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  4. #34
    #include<xErath.h> xErath's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by okinrus
    Can you clarify what this means? Like if I use the <em> tag, it's supposed to add emphasis, but each browser defines this differently. For example, lynx might define emphasis as bold text, whereas IE might define emphasis as italics. Is the emphasis part of the presentation? I think so, but it's not about how something is presented, but how the user reacts


    OK, but no browser can determine what a font will look like exactly on the screen. For instance, my linux system might not have a true type font server or enabled X server, and my fonts will look jaggy. Another system need not even have the the right font. This is all notwithstanding each system interpreting the font tag the same way. Other visual things could be detailed.
    Each browser has it's own default css. If you use em it's up to you to provide the proper formating rules. If not, the browser uses its default. About the fonts, it's the same. The webpage provides info on the font to be used. If there's no font available on the system a default one is used. Good webpages manage all these little issues, and are always well displayed.
    Plus, if you want to continue this discussion, please inform yourself a bit.
    www.w3.org
    www.w3schools.org
    http://www.mcsr.olemiss.edu/~mudws/font.html
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critici...ernet_Explorer

    The problem with IE is something like: you say you want the text to be bold and italic. Any browser will render that text that way. IE instead will only render the bold atribute, and add maybe a unwanted underline. This is a small unpractical example. IE doesn't conform to the rules. So you'll end up with garbage. Unfortunatly IE is the most used browser, so most webpages conform to IE and not the standards.
    The same applies for C/C++. If you write good clean and portable code, you can be sure it'll almost work on any platform. If you try stunts like fflush(stdin); you'll get a unwanted operation, but any MS compiler will flush stdin, because it doesn't conform to the standards.
    Last edited by xErath; 07-05-2005 at 11:50 PM.

  5. #35
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    I have pretty much ignored most of this thread, so don't flame if this has been said already.

    First off, I would suggest making the side bar on the right a bit smaller, as it rather large and seems to take up some room for the content.

    Also, add links to the site you are currently at..as in make the menu system static so the options don't change around or dissapear when you go to a different page.

    Other than that, looks good!

  6. #36
    5|-|1+|-|34|) ober's Avatar
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    xErath, thanks for saying exactly what I should have said. I couldn't have said it any better myself.

    okinrus, you need to do some reading and some web development to understand what we're talking about here. IE is the bane of any true web developer and if you start developing yourself, you'll find that you develop with Opera or FF (Opera is my choice), and then you make corrections for IE.... not the other way around. IE is a piece of tolerant garbage IMO, and unfortunately, I think they're at a point where they won't ever be able to fix the mess they've got themselves into. Fixing the browser to support the current standard would mean that they'd break probably 60% of the websites on the net. I'd love to see that day, but unfortunately for us, I don't think MS would do that because everyone would stop using their stuff.

    Sad but true.

  7. #37
    unleashed alphaoide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ober
    IE is a piece of tolerant garbage IMO, and unfortunately, I think they're at a point where they won't ever be able to fix the mess they've got themselves into. Fixing the browser to support the current standard would mean that they'd break probably 60% of the websites on the net. I'd love to see that day, but unfortunately for us, I don't think MS would do that because everyone would stop using their stuff.

    Sad but true.
    WaSP to Collaborate with Microsoft to Promote Web Standards
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  8. #38
    #include<xErath.h> xErath's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alphaoide
    WaSP to Collaborate with Microsoft to Promote Web Standards
    http://webstandards.org/press/releas.../05/index.html
    beautifull!!!....
    Today Visual Studio 2005 and ASP.NET 2.0, currently in beta, create XHTML 1.0 transitional markup by default and provide real-time standards and browser markup validation.

  9. #39
    Registered User major_small's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ober
    Fixing the browser to support the current standard would mean that they'd break probably 60% of the websites on the net. I'd love to see that day, but unfortunately for us, I don't think MS would do that because everyone would stop using their stuff.

    Sad but true.
    I would hope opera/ff users are pressuring web developers enough... whenever I get to a page that says "you must have internet explorer x or better" I don't even give it a chance, unless it's something I really need, in which case I fire a quasi-nasty email to the web developer (I usually don't reboot into windows just to see the page) http://www.w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp
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  10. #40
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    okinrus, you need to do some reading and some web development to understand what we're talking about here. IE is the bane of any true web developer and if you start developing yourself, you'll find that you develop with Opera or FF (Opera is my choice), and then you make corrections for IE.... not the other way around. IE is a piece of tolerant garbage IMO, and unfortunately, I think they're at a point where they won't ever be able to fix the mess they've got themselves into. Fixing the browser to support the current standard would mean that they'd break probably 60% of the websites on the net. I'd love to see that day, but unfortunately for us, I don't think MS would do that because everyone would stop using their stuff.
    ober, I don't do professional web-developing, but have done a little bit of raw html and I've been meaning to get a book on css. As for IE, yes, I've heard it said often that IE lets illegal html go, but it's really Microsoft's choice, I think. They've probably analysed this issue, found the majority of users not web developers like the browser to guess the best layout, and then built the software. Or they built the software and then found fixing it to be too costly. Of course this situation puts the web developers at a disadvantage---kind of like a compiler that guesses variable names. But Microsoft probably thinks a good developer would test a page using the three main browsers and maybe a few rare ones such as Konquer.

    The same applies for C/C++. If you write good clean and portable code, you can be sure it'll almost work on any platform. If you try stunts like fflush(stdin); you'll get a unwanted operation, but any MS compiler will flush stdin, because it doesn't conform to the standards.
    xrath, fflush stdin is undefined by the C/C++ stdandards; any compiler is free to define this behavior and remain standard. But personally, I think the best behavior would be for the compiler to mark it as an error or warning. I don't think microsoft or gcc does this.

  11. #41
    Code Goddess Prelude's Avatar
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    >Also, do you have plans to add more on the following tree topics
    Probably, but they aren't on my list at the moment.

    >Everything is good except for the code background
    Fixed.

    >and one major problem you used C and not C++
    For good reason. If I used C++ then everyone would expect me to use a proper C++ framework, which would complicate the examples drastically. With C, nothing gets in the way of the underlying logic while still maintaining good code.

    >it's especially annoying since it's always right in the middle of what you're reading
    Not anymore.

    >I found something
    Fixed.

    >add links to the site you are currently at
    I went out of my way to avoid doing that because it's considered a common mistake of web design.
    My best code is written with the delete key.

  12. #42
    #include<xErath.h> xErath's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by okinrus
    Or they built the software and then found fixing it to be too costly. Of course this situation puts the web developers at a disadvantage
    This is what I been saying
    Quote Originally Posted by okinrus
    But Microsoft probably thinks a good developer would test a page using the three main browsers and maybe a few rare ones such as Konquer.
    Microsoft what ?!? You're joking right ?!?
    This is a piece of code from browser.js from Opera
    Code:
    // Fixing MSDN
    // Problem: very IE-centric scripting, excludes other browsers with sniffing
    // Credits: Tarquin
    if( location.href.indexOf('http:\/\/msdn.microsoft.com\/workshop\/') == 0 ) {
    //more 70 lines of code
    xrath, fflush stdin is undefined by the C/C++ stdandards; any compiler is free to define this behavior and remain standard. But personally, I think the best behavior would be for the compiler to mark it as an error or warning. I don't think microsoft or gcc does this.
    please read the link
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...crt_fflush.asp
    MS supports fflush(stdin); Any standard code works on MSVC++. Code for VC++ only may not work on a standard compliant compiler.

    I don't want to continue this discussion here. This topic is dedicated to Prelude's website.

  13. #43
    Skunkmeister Stoned_Coder's Avatar
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    I still think that code could benefit from syntax colourring. You could use this or maybe this.
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  14. #44
    Code Goddess Prelude's Avatar
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    >I still think that code could benefit from syntax colourring.
    That's my next change. I got about twenty lines into my own implementation of C++ to HTML, then changed my mind and modified Sunlight's code to suit my needs.

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  15. #45
    VA National Guard The Brain's Avatar
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    "stealing" seems like such a harsh word.. i prefer to think of it as, "code re-use"
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