Test your genious!

This is a discussion on Test your genious! within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; I'm pretty sure it was RoD Edit: Yep RoD http://cboard.cprogramming.com/showt...383#post419383 BTW Welcome back...

  1. #31
    & the hat of GPL slaying Thantos's Avatar
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    I'm pretty sure it was RoD
    Edit:
    Yep RoD http://cboard.cprogramming.com/showt...383#post419383

    BTW Welcome back

  2. #32
    Even death may die... Dante Shamest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stovellp
    I heard children from asian countries (especially Japan) find the first few years at school very easy as far as maths goes because their counting system goes
    "zero one two three four five six seven eight nine"
    then
    "one-zero one-one one-two"...
    ie, they only have to remember the first 10 numbers, while us English speakers have the first 10, then we get into "teens", then "twenties", then "hundreds" etc etc.

    Can anyone from these countries or who speaks these languages confirm it?
    Not sure about Japanese, but what you say is true for Mandarin Chinese.

  3. #33
    Carnivore ('-'v) Hunter2's Avatar
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    I heard children from asian countries (especially Japan) find the first few years at school very easy as far as maths goes because their counting system goes
    "zero one two three four five six seven eight nine"
    then
    "one-zero one-one one-two"...
    ie, they only have to remember the first 10 numbers, while us English speakers have the first 10, then we get into "teens", then "twenties", then "hundreds" etc etc.
    Not sure about other dialects, but for Mandarin it goes:
    Zero, One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, Nine
    Ten, Ten-one, Ten-two, Ten-three, Ten-four, Ten-five, Ten-six, Ten-seven, Ten-eight, Ten-nine
    Two-ten, Two-ten-one, Two-ten-two, Two-ten-three, etc...
    Just Google It. √

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  4. #34
    Super Moderater.
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    Yeah that's strange, even my program has difficulties.

    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    #include <string>
    
    using namespace std;
    
    int main()
    {
         
        char array[120]={" FINISHED FILES ARE THE RESULT OF YEARS OF SCIENTIFIC STUDY COMBINED WITH THE EXPERIENCE OF YEARS..."};
        
        int size=strlen(array);
        
        int counter=-3;
        for(int i=0 ; i <size; i++)
        {
            if(array[i]=='F')
            {
                counter++;
            }    
        }
        cout<<counter;
        int stop;
        cin>>stop;
    }

  5. #35
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    Aoccdrnig to rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.

  6. #36
    Registered User Queatrix's Avatar
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    I understood what you said MW_PAUL_UK. Scarry thing!

  7. #37
    The Defective GRAPE Lurker's Avatar
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    One reason besides the sound differences in of might be the fact that quite a few languages get by without a word filling the space of "of" at all - it is a case, like in Latin.

    Quote Originally Posted by stovellp
    I heard children from asian countries (especially Japan) find the first few years at school very easy as far as maths goes because their counting system goes
    "zero one two three four five six seven eight nine"
    then
    "one-zero one-one one-two"...
    ie, they only have to remember the first 10 numbers, while us English speakers have the first 10, then we get into "teens", then "twenties", then "hundreds" etc etc.

    Can anyone from these countries or who speaks these languages confirm it?

    Languages have many different ways of counting numbers. Japanese's system is essentially 0-10, then 10+1, 10+2 etc. At 20, it is (2 x 10), (2 x 10 + 1), etc. This pattern is continued for a while. This is because Japanese borrowed from Chinese.

    My favorite (and the most complex IMHO) is in Nimbia, a dialect of Gwandara spoken in Nigeria. It is a duodecimal system, so it goes from 1-12 and then gets more complex. It goes 12 + 1, 12 + 2, until 24, which is (12 x 2), then (12 x 2 + 1), etc. 70 is "gume biyar ni gwom" (12 x 5 + 10). This continues up to 144 ("wo"), or "12 squared".

    Hindi is similar to our counting system up to 100. I don't want to spend time going into it now, but here's an example:

    baaruh karor chauntees lakh chhuppun hazar saat sau nuwaasee
    12 10000000 + 34 100000 + 56 1000 + 7 100 + 89

    123456789
    Do not make direct eye contact with me.

  8. #38
    Registered User FlameZ's Avatar
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    Good God, I counted it 6! Yey!

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