VB .Net : is it worth the trouble?

This is a discussion on VB .Net : is it worth the trouble? within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; Is this language worth spending time on? im having it in college but i don't know if i should sharpen ...

  1. #1
    former member Brain Cell's Avatar
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    VB .Net

    Is this language worth spending time on? im having it in college but i don't know if i should sharpen my skills in it or just study it to pass the exam.

    let me know what you guys think
    Last edited by Brain Cell; 11-28-2004 at 02:02 PM.
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  2. #2
    the hat of redundancy hat nvoigt's Avatar
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    VB is the dark side. It's easy, it's tempting and it will lead to frustration, hate and anger. VB.NET is the same thing with a .NET marker tagged on. If you need a rapid development language, use C#. If you need power, use C++.
    hth
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  3. #3
    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    I agree. C# and VB.Net offer you the same capabilities, but C# makes better use of them.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

  4. #4
    former member Brain Cell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nvoigt
    VB is the dark side. It's easy, it's tempting and it will lead to frustration, hate and anger. VB.NET is the same thing with a .NET marker tagged on. If you need a rapid development language, use C#. If you need power, use C++.
    actually i hate it in every single way. The compiler just won't leave me alone and interrupts me in almost everyline.

    Our college doesn't offer a C# course. But if C# is that good then maybe i take a course from somewhere else.

    What im asking is , is it popular nowadays (talking about companies) and do you think it can really help in my career?

    im planning on bieng a C\C++ and Java programmer so i don't know if Vb.Net will add anything to my career.
    My Tutorials :
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  5. #5
    Registered User linuxdude's Avatar
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    <rant>Yeah. I have to take it right now also. I freakin' hate it. Every time you want to change something above or below the line you are in and didn't finish that line, a syntax error will come up. Then you were intending to go over after you hit up, and viola a freaking help tutorial thing comes up. If you mispell something it thinks you created a new variable without initializing it and(not only that) it automatically assignes it 0. Then your whole code doesn't work, instead of just telling you to declare you variables(I know I can change it but our teacher won't let us, and why should I have to type Option Explicit at the beginning of my code. I hate its indentions also. Rediculous. I never use that much space in my code.</rant>

  6. #6
    Climber spoon_'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brain Cell
    actually i hate it in every single way. The compiler just won't leave me alone and interrupts me in almost everyline.
    So you would rather wait until you hit compile and then go sifting through code to find the errors rather than having it pointed out to you as you type?

    Odd fellow.
    {RTFM, KISS}

  7. #7
    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spoon_
    So you would rather wait until you hit compile and then go sifting through code to find the errors rather than having it pointed out to you as you type?

    Odd fellow.
    Perhaps he'd like something sensible, like the C# IDE underlining whatever is wrong without further comment. The popups from VB made me crazy the short time I used it, too.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

  8. #8
    former member Brain Cell's Avatar
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    i actually don't like bieng notified of errors while im coding because sometimes i move between incomplete lines in C\C++ but when i do that in VB.NET it just won't leave me alone and the code will be either underlined (shows an error) or replaced by assumptions. I've been through every single thing linuxdude said
    My Tutorials :
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  9. #9
    Registered User axon's Avatar
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    >>will be either underlined (shows an error) or replaced by assumptions<<

    you could turn this feature off in properties

    some entropy with that sink? entropysink.com

    there are two cardinal sins from which all others spring: Impatience and Laziness. - franz kafka

  10. #10
    Bob Dole for '08 B0bDole's Avatar
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    Visual C++ .NEt !
    Hmm

  11. #11
    former member Brain Cell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by axon
    >>will be either underlined (shows an error) or replaced by assumptions<<

    you could turn this feature off in properties
    never knew that , thanks. But the language is still ugly to me

    i just wanna know if it really serves my career or not (i know it would help but i ment like would it make a big difference or not)
    My Tutorials :
    - Bad programming practices in : C
    - C\C++ Tips
    (constrcutive criticism is very welcome)


    - Brain Cell

  12. #12
    essence of digital xddxogm3's Avatar
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    I think the only good reason for VB is for people that know nothing about programming to learn a basis of code. This basis provides them a stepping stone into the more complex languages or a way to stop themselves before they fail the harder languages. But beyond that, I feel VB is weak in power (compared to other languages), and not worth the M$ price tag. It also is not available on the *nix platform ( if it is I have been unable to find it).
    "Hence to fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence;
    supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting."
    Art of War Sun Tzu

  13. #13
    unleashed alphaoide's Avatar
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    For your information, from software development magazine http://www.sdmagazine.com/documents/.../sdm0411a.html
    The 2004 Software Development salary survey collected nearly 5,000 responses from staff and managers with titles ranging from programmer/analyst to chief architect and technical officer.....

    Technology and Tools, 2000Ė2004

    Over the last five years, some application trends have become obvious: Not surprisingly, given the buzz and simplicity of the technology, Web services have mushroomed from comprising 23% of respondentsí applications in 2002 to 31% in 2004. Despite a similar level of hype, application service providers havenít fared as well, rising from 17% in 2000 to 22% in 2004. The client/ server model has fallen from 74% in 2000 to 64% in 2004, and n-tier applications have dropped from 40% in 2000 to 24% in 2004. Real-time/embedded software has dropped slightly in popularity from 24% in 2000 to 20% this year, and its cousin, mobile and wireless software, has grown from 7% to 11% over the same period.

    The most common languages or platforms? Oracle or other database, at 67%, Java at 64%, C++ at 63%, Perl or other scripting languages at 53%, .NET at 50%, C at 48%, J2EE at 40%, JavaBeans at 35%, C# at 34% and SOAP at 30%. At the opposite end of the spectrum, legacy technologies Cobol and Delphi have fallen steadily in popularity over the past five years: Their 2000 standings were 28% and 65%, respectively; they stand today at 20% and 8%. CORBA/COM/middleware has also dropped from 2000ís 36% to 2004ís 18%. For the first time, Java 2 Mobile Edition (J2ME) made the list at 7%.
    source: compsci textbooks, cboard.cprogramming.com, world wide web, common sense

  14. #14
    Bob Dole for '08 B0bDole's Avatar
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    what does that^^ have to do with vb?
    Hmm

  15. #15
    Super Moderator VirtualAce's Avatar
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    I've only coded in VB6 but several of my friends have coded in VB.NET. Essentially not much has changed. The one thing that still sticks out is that BASIC in its purest form was not designed to be a structured language. No amount of tweaking or hacking on MS's part to the core of BASIC or the IDE used to program it will ever change that fact.

    Your class objects simply 'USE' controls, but they are really not actual controls. It would be like writing a class in C++ but not being able to have member variables or member functions. Useful up to a point. All you do is connect the visual elements to your code via ID's and then use those controls via methods and properties. Let's say you have a button. In MSVC you would probably derive from a button class and put relevant member variables in your derived class relative to the type of button. Of course this is just one example and there are a million different approaches, but let's just pretend for a moment.

    In VB6 or VB in general you can still put a button on your form, but you cannot add methods to it or add properties. They have set methods and set properties. So what VB really comes down to is this:

    1. Create GUI object in form editor and give it a name to ID it in code.
    2. Use control 'similar' to class objects in C btnOk.Push(), text=btnOk.GetCaption()
    3. Act on your actual data based on the status of the button.

    As you can see your class that actually needs the button is so far removed from the actual object it's almost ridiculous to call it a class. It's more like you have two classes. One you can't touch and one you can.

    Button --------------- Class that uses button to change it's data

    So truly the button is merely an interface tool which is not all bad, but it becomes a pain in the arse eventually because everything is so disconnected. C++ is much more elegant and efficient.

    I'm not saying VB is terrible because it serves its purpose, but it's still not really an object oriented language in my mind. More like an object-oriented interface or front-end that you can use to make changes to the actual data in the code.

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