Visual Basic vs C++

This is a discussion on Visual Basic vs C++ within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; VB and C++ both have their places. Visual Basic is a Rapid Application Development tool, that means it is used ...

  1. #16
    Registered User BillBoeBaggins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    107
    VB and C++ both have their places. Visual Basic is a Rapid Application Development tool, that means it is used to snap out applications not make tight efficient code, or to stimulate you. I like to proto type in VB and then convert what I can in C++ to get rid of dependencies.
    Don't get me wrong I love C++ over VB, but when I need something done I open VB first then convert what I can into C++.
    May the compiler be with you.
    Be one with the compiler, and you shall prosper greatly.

  2. #17
    the hat of redundancy hat nvoigt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Hannover, Germany
    Posts
    3,139
    VB is the dark side of the source. It's easy, tempting and fast, but it leads to fear, anger and aggression.

    Every language has it's uses, and VB was a language that could be used very well for RAD purposes. When UI was more important than program logic, VB was the way to go. Why past tense ? Because C# offers the same advantages ( and more ), minus all the drawbacks of VB.

    C++ still rules when it comes to executable speed, but only few programs really need the speed of C++ and most become more cost effective when development time is cut by half when using a RAD language like C#.
    hth
    -nv

    She was so Blonde, she spent 20 minutes looking at the orange juice can because it said "Concentrate."

    When in doubt, read the FAQ.
    Then ask a smart question.

  3. #18
    01000011 00100000 0010000
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    38
    Thanks for the info, and is C# the way to go?

    I came from VB, and I agree it is a powerful language, but everyone said C because it is low level. So I am learning C and VB is easier in some areas, and just as powerful in most areas. So back to the original question, does C# include all the good stuff in C and all the good stuff in VB? Or what?

  4. #19
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    4,913
    C# was designed specifically for .NET, so if you're doing .NET, it is IMO the way to go. Because you have all the .NET libraries that are so easy to use, VB loses a lot of its RAD advantage. And C# has ALL the abilities of .NET built right in and easy to learn.

  5. #20
    Registered User major_small's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    2,787
    I'd definately choose C++ over VB... mostly because it's a lower-level language and you can use it on almost any operating system... for example, if you were into robotics, you usually have a choice of BASIC or C...

    VB is too high a language for me... and it isn't as flexible as C/C++... for example, you could use C to control a servo from an embedded OS... you can't do that with VB...

    I don't like the idea of an OS-dependent language, but judging from previous posts, it looks like I may be juming into a firestorm here...
    Join is in our Unofficial Cprog IRC channel
    Server: irc.phoenixradio.org
    Channel: #Tech


    Team Cprog Folding@Home: Team #43476
    Download it Here
    Detailed Stats Here
    More Detailed Stats
    52 Members so far, are YOU a member?
    Current team score: 1223226 (ranked 374 of 45152)

    The CBoard team is doing better than 99.16% of the other teams
    Top 5 Members: Xterria(518175), pianorain(118517), Bennet(64957), JaWiB(55610), alphaoide(44374)

    Last Updated on: Wed, 30 Aug, 2006 @ 2:30 PM EDT

  6. #21
    5|-|1+|-|34|) ober's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    4,429
    Hardware interfacing. Low level means that you can do things like set bits and flags in the OS that affect hardware that you can't do in higher level languages.

  7. #22
    5|-|1+|-|34|) ober's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    4,429
    No, you CAN do that with C. And C is actually compiled into Assembly and then into machine code (or sometimes straight to machine code), as are all languages.

    Microsoft did create C#. And no, it's not wrong.

    Wow... you're just a whole lot of wrong.

  8. #23
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    4,913
    I don't think so. Here's the definition I've always used for low-level. They started with binary. Assembly is just words put in place of certain combinations of 1's and 0's. Then they made the first compilers that would convert an easier to understand code down to binary or "machine language". You can see how far it's gone. The point behind OOP is so that we can model the real world in a way that makes sense to us. But there is a trade-off between making sense to us and making sense to the computer, and the more you go towads the latter, the more power you have in your program. C is as popular as it is because it is so close to the optimum balance. It ties in very closely with assembly, but the syntax is so easy to read, that a programmer from another language can easily understand it's source.

  9. #24
    'AlHamdulillah
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    790
    about C now. when you say "like set bits and flags in the OS that affect hardware " you mean like doing something like this?
    no, he means like in the case of driver development, you can get access to hardware interfaces such as the COM(serial) ports, PCI and AGP.
    there used to be something here, but not anymore

  10. #25
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    4,913
    The magical C Fairies

  11. #26
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    4,913
    I didn't think you would

  12. #27
    Registered User major_small's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    2,787
    in other words, it's too complicated and if you keep learning more about C, you'll eventually get down to the nitty gritty and find out you can create whole operating systems <cough>NT</cough> with it...
    Join is in our Unofficial Cprog IRC channel
    Server: irc.phoenixradio.org
    Channel: #Tech


    Team Cprog Folding@Home: Team #43476
    Download it Here
    Detailed Stats Here
    More Detailed Stats
    52 Members so far, are YOU a member?
    Current team score: 1223226 (ranked 374 of 45152)

    The CBoard team is doing better than 99.16% of the other teams
    Top 5 Members: Xterria(518175), pianorain(118517), Bennet(64957), JaWiB(55610), alphaoide(44374)

    Last Updated on: Wed, 30 Aug, 2006 @ 2:30 PM EDT

  13. #28
    'AlHamdulillah
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    790
    but using what aspect of the language - i mean how?
    It is quite apparent that you do not have a basic concept of Von Neumann architecture and definately none of the x86 variety. I seriously recommend you do a google search for stuff before you ask questions that make you look very stupid.

    you'll eventually get down to the nitty gritty and find out you can create whole operating systems <cough>NT</cough> with it...
    I personally would of used a real operating system, such as linux; however, I guess to each his own .
    there used to be something here, but not anymore

  14. #29
    the hat of redundancy hat nvoigt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Hannover, Germany
    Posts
    3,139
    In C/C++ you can program with functions like _inp/_outp, setjmp, signal, _pipe etc.

    In C#, you cannot ( or not as easily ) because this level is abstracted or hidden.

    C is a lower level language than C# in this case.
    hth
    -nv

    She was so Blonde, she spent 20 minutes looking at the orange juice can because it said "Concentrate."

    When in doubt, read the FAQ.
    Then ask a smart question.

  15. #30
    'AlHamdulillah
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    790
    oh, there are certain non standard ways of doing it, mainly because protected operating systems attempt to shield almost all developers from the hardware access(this is why you have to go through the OS to get access to serial ports). The reason I said look up I/O is that there is a concept called 'memory-mapped I/O". memory-mapped I/O is when a hardware's I/O ports are mapped to specific memory addresses. now what do pointers do ?
    there used to be something here, but not anymore

Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast
Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11-23-2007, 12:13 AM
  2. Run Visual Basic code inside C++?
    By torbjoen in forum Windows Programming
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-01-2002, 12:41 AM
  3. <list>
    By Unregistered in forum C++ Programming
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 02-24-2002, 04:07 PM
  4. Visual Basic C++
    By gussguss in forum C++ Programming
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-20-2001, 10:58 AM

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21