Cprogramming.com/compiler.html

This is a discussion on Cprogramming.com/compiler.html within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; There are numerous compilers available for C++ programming. One of the easiest compilers to use is the Bloodshed Dev compiler. ...

  1. #1
    Registered User Russell's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    71

    Cprogramming.com/compiler.html

    There are numerous compilers available for C++ programming. One of the easiest compilers to use is the Bloodshed Dev compiler.
    I am under the impression Bloodshed Dev-C++ is an IDE that implements external GCC-based compilers.

  2. #2
    & the hat of GPL slaying Thantos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    5,681
    Dev-C++ uses the MingW ports of GCC and G++ by default but that you could change it if you so wished.

    However what was said is not incorrect because most feel that the IDE is apart of the compiler when packaged as such.

  3. #3
    Registered User Russell's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    71
    I feel it's a misleading statement since, as the name suggests, an IDE is much, much more than a `compiler' and for a new programmer who knows no better, it may give them a false representation regarding the necessary tools for programming.

  4. #4
    The Defective GRAPE Lurker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    949
    Quote Originally Posted by Russell
    an IDE is much, much more than a `compiler'
    In my opinion, a compiler is a lot more impressive than an IDE, but that's just an opinion .
    Do not make direct eye contact with me.

  5. #5
    Registered User Russell's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    71
    My point is: an IDE is, in addition to a compiler, an editor, project manager, debugger, etc., therefore calling an IDE a compiler is false.

  6. #6
    & the hat of GPL slaying Thantos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    5,681
    A new programmer really doesn't need to know the difference between a compiler, and IDE, projects, debugger, etc. Trying to learn all that in the beginning is a bit of an overload. Most know they need a compiler, Dev has a compiler and all the tools they need. So they can start off learning the language and as the learn more they'll learn the differences between all the tools and how to use them. But that comes with time.

    I can't think of a single program that is an IDE and compiler. Most are broken up into the IDE and the compiler (though ones like Borland and VS don't allow you to change the compiler they use) but do it in a seemless fashion so the user doesn't notice that there are infact multiple programs working in the background.

  7. #7
    Registered User Russell's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    71
    http://www.cprogramming.com/other.html
    Bloodshed Dev 4.0 Don't be fooled by the name, this is a wonderful compiler. It is easy to set up, and it runs in windows. It can still create DOS programs, however. At six megabytes, it is not an excessively long download. If you want an easy to use free compiler (unless you want to donate $20, which is not required), try this one. For information on using this compiler, go here.
    Should read:

    Bloodshed Dev 4.0 Don't be fooled by the name, this is a wonderful IDE (Integrated Development Environment). It is easy to set up, and it runs in windows. It can still create DOS programs, however. At six megabytes, it is not an excessively long download. If you want an easy to use free IDE (unless you want to donate $20, which is not required), try this one. For information on using this IDE, go here.

  8. #8
    & the hat of GPL slaying Thantos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    5,681
    But it is MORE then a simple IDE, it is an IDE, compiler, debugger, project manager, and linker (you do know there is a difference between a compiler and a linker right? ) all rolled into one.

  9. #9
    Registered User Russell's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by Thantos
    A new programmer really doesn't need to know the difference between a compiler, and IDE, projects, debugger, etc. Trying to learn all that in the beginning is a bit of an overload.
    Without learning the tools, how can one be expected to learn a trade that implements the tools?

  10. #10
    Registered User Russell's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by Thantos
    But it is MORE then a simple IDE, it is an IDE, compiler, debugger, project manager, and linker (you do know there is a difference between a compiler and a linker right? ) all rolled into one.
    My point entirely. Thank you. =)

  11. #11
    erstwhile
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    2,227
    Quote Originally Posted by Russell
    http://www.cprogramming.com/other.html

    Should read:

    Bloodshed Dev 4.0 Don't be fooled by the name, this is a wonderful IDE (Integrated Development Environment). It is easy to set up, and it runs in windows. It can still create DOS programs, however. At six megabytes, it is not an excessively long download. If you want an easy to use free IDE (unless you want to donate $20, which is not required), try this one. For information on using this IDE, go here.
    Check out the faq. For Dev-Cpp (listed in "Editors & IDE's") it reads:
    This is a very popular, open source (delphi) IDE for MinGW....
    I'm inclined to agree with Thantos, however: for those starting out minimizing confusion between what different toolset are is arguably simpler. There are also precedents for such inaccuracies carrying forward in other disciplines for similarly utilitarian purposes. However, I think that documentation, such as that on cprog, should, where possible, resolve any such ambiguities in the interests of accuracy.

    Personally, I used to get unconscionably irritated when I read someone refer to an 'ide' as a 'compiler' but i've since learned that pedantically correcting them is a wasted effort - they come to learn the difference in their own way and in their own time.
    CProgramming FAQ
    Caution: this person may be a carrier of the misinformation virus.

  12. #12
    & the hat of GPL slaying Thantos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    5,681
    Without learning the tools, how can one be expected to learn a trade that implements the tools?
    They will learn them in time. You don't start teaching algebra to first graders, you teach them how to count and simple math, and from there you build on to it until they eventually learn calculas. Its the same process with programming and it's tools. You go "this is a compiler where you write your code and hit the button", and eventually they will learn the differences between the IDE, the preprocessor, the compiler, and the linker. But in the beginning they do not need to know those parts.

    My point entirely. Thank you. =)
    I don't think you understand my point. The point is that the page was directed to new programers that do not know the differences between each of the tools. As such the term compiler was the most appropriate term to describe what Dev-C++ is. It is called writing for your audience.

  13. #13
    Registered User Russell's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    71
    How can you call something, something it's not? But then again, you probably call youself a programmer.

  14. #14
    & the hat of GPL slaying Thantos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    5,681
    Ah I love it when people resort to personal attacks when they can't think of a rational rebuttal.

  15. #15
    ¡Amo fútbol!
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    2,136
    Russell, find something worthwhile to argue about. Else, STFU.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21