LISP (DrScheme) any one?

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    mov.w #$1337,D0 Jeremy G's Avatar
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    LISP (DrScheme) any one?

    My CSC 240 Course--Intro to diff programming languages just started LISP via DrScheme. Our teacher gave us the task of creating a "game". Of course the teacher was expecting a very very simple text based kind of "guess a number" higher or lower kind of game. But me, the over acheiving slacky (I forget to do boring assignments) have surpassed the teachers greatest expectations.

    This truly is proof that any good programmer--that really understands logic of programming--can code in any language with merely a syntax reference. I made this game completly from scratch, refering to the manual for function calls to windows api. This truly is my FIRST lisp program, and second LISP function. (A function can be a program, in a way kinda is anyway). My first was the inclass tutorial to make a fib recursive function.

    You can run it in DrSchme -> select language -> mrEd.
    Or you can just view the screen shot.

    http://www.restmasszero.com/snakes.jpg

    Obviously its a Snakes clone, but a good one.
    Code:
    ;; Snake Game in windows VIA DrScheme && MrEd
    ;; Author: Jeremy Giberson
    ;; References: Online Documentation
    ;; Game Reference: None, Original - ground up 
    (define (SNAKES)
    ;; Window and Canvas implimentation extracted and modified from online documentation
    ;; Make a 340  200 canvas
    (define frame (instantiate frame% ("Nibbles - Dr Scheme Project") (width 340) (height 218) (min-width 340) (min-height 218) (stretchable-width #f) (stretchable-height #f)))
    ;; message area
    (define msg (instantiate message% ("Nibbles the Snakes Clone" frame)))
    (define my-canvas%
      (class canvas% ; The base class is canvas%
        ;; Declare overrides:
        ;(override on-event on-char)
        (override on-char)
        ;; Define overriding method to handle mouse events
        ;(define on-event (lambda (event) (getInput event)))
        ;; Define overriding method to handle keyboard events
        (define on-char (lambda (event) (getInput event)))
        ;; Call the superclass initialization (and pass on all init args)
        (super-instantiate ())))
    
         ;; Make a canvas that handles events in the frame
         (define canvas (instantiate my-canvas% (frame)))
    
    ;; Get the canvas's drawing context
    (define dc (send canvas get-dc))
    
    ;; Make some pens and brushes
    (define no-pen (instantiate pen% ("BLACK" 1 'transparent)))
    (define no-brush (instantiate brush% ("BLACK" 'transparent)))
    (define black-pen (instantiate pen% ("BLACK" 1 'solid)))
    (define blue-brush (instantiate brush% ("BLUE" 'solid)))
    (define yellow-brush (instantiate brush% ("YELLOW" 'solid)))
    (define yellow-pen (instantiate pen% ("LIGHTGREY" 1 'solid)))
    (define red-pen (instantiate pen% ("RED" 2 'solid)))
    (define red-brush (instantiate brush% ("RED" 'solid)))
    (define white-brush (instantiate brush% ("WHITE" 'solid)))
    
    ;; game structures
         (define-struct posn (x y))  ;; Recomended Structure for points
         ;; Define a structure that has a position variable, and next structure pointer
         (define-struct segment (position next isnextnull))
    
    ;; game global variables
         (define SNAKE_HEAD (make-segment (make-posn 30 20) 0 1))
         (define BLOCKSIZE 10)
         (define INITIALIZED #f)
         (define DIRECTION 1) ; 0 = north, 1 = east, 2 = south, 3 = west
         (define SCORE 0)
         (define APPLE (make-posn (* 18 10) (* 3 10)))
     
    
    ;; Append segment function
    ;; recursively returns a new segment definition, used with set! command to redefine iniitial head node
    (define (appendSeg thisSeg position) ;; needs head segment above it, and what is to become this segment
       (cond
         [(= (segment-isnextnull thisSeg) 0) (make-segment (segment-position thisSeg) (appendSeg (segment-next thisSeg) position) 0)] ;; is next pointer null?
         [else (make-segment (segment-position thisSeg) (make-segment position 0 1) 0)] ;; it was
        )
    )
    
    ;; Shuffle segment 
    ;; recursively returns a new segment definition where each next seg has the previous's position
    (define (shuffleSeg thisSeg position)
       (cond
         [(= (segment-isnextnull thisSeg) 0) (make-segment position (shuffleSeg (segment-next thisSeg) (segment-position thisSeg)) 0)] ;; is next pointer null?
         [else (make-segment position 0 1)] ;; it was
        )
    )  
    
    ;; Get Tail Segment
    ;; retrieve the position value of tail segment in list
    (define (getTailSeg thisSeg)
      (cond
        [(= (segment-isnextnull thisSeg) 0) (getTailSeg (segment-next thisSeg))]
        [else (segment-position thisSeg)]
        )
    )
    
    ;;prints an individual segment's position x value
    (define (printSeg aSegment)
      (newline)(display "Position (x, y): (")
      (display (posn-x (segment-position aSegment)))(display ", ")
      (display (posn-y (segment-position aSegment)))(display ")")
    )
    
    ;; Display segment list function
    (define (displaySeg thisSeg) ;; needs head segment above it, and what is to become this segment
      (printSeg thisSeg)
      (cond
         [(= (segment-isnextnull thisSeg) 0) (displaySeg (segment-next thisSeg))] ;; is next pointer null?
      )
    )
    
    ;; Render individual segment
    (define (renderSeg aDc aSegment)
         ;(printSeg aSegment)
         (send aDc draw-rectangle (posn-x (segment-position aSegment)) (posn-y (segment-position aSegment)) BLOCKSIZE BLOCKSIZE)         
    )
     
    ;; Render segment list
    (define (renderSegList aDc thisSeg)
      [renderSeg aDc thisSeg]
       (cond
         [(= (segment-isnextnull thisSeg) 0) (renderSegList aDc (segment-next thisSeg))]
         )
      )
    
    ;; Render apple
    (define (renderApple aDc position)
         (send aDc draw-rectangle (posn-x position) (posn-y position) BLOCKSIZE BLOCKSIZE)         
    )
    
    ;; Kindof a debug function
    ;; nice place to test list functionality
    (define (TestListFunction)
        (set! SNAKE_HEAD (appendSeg SNAKE_HEAD (make-posn 20 20)))
        (set! SNAKE_HEAD (appendSeg SNAKE_HEAD (make-posn 30 20)))
        (set! SNAKE_HEAD (appendSeg SNAKE_HEAD (make-posn 40 20)))
       ; (displaySeg SNAKE_HEAD)
        (set! SNAKE_HEAD (shuffleSeg SNAKE_HEAD (make-posn 10 10)))
       ; (displaySeg SNAKE_HEAD)
       (send dc set-brush blue-brush) 
       (renderSegList (send canvas get-dc) SNAKE_HEAD)
    
    )
    (define (renderGame dc)
      (send dc clear) ; clear the screen to white
      ;; start rendering the field
      (send dc set-pen yellow-pen)
      (do ((y 0))
           ((> y 20))
                (send dc draw-line 0 (* y 10) 340 (* y 10))
           (set! y (+ y 1));; loop until the frame is closed
      )   
      (do ((x 0))
           ((> x 34))
                (send dc draw-line (* x 10) 0 (* x 10) 200)
           (set! x (+ x 1));; loop until the frame is closed
      )  
      
      ;; render the apple
      (send dc set-brush red-brush)
      (renderApple dc APPLE)
      
      (send dc set-brush blue-brush)
      (send dc set-pen black-pen)
      (renderSegList dc SNAKE_HEAD) ;; render the snake
       
    )
    
    ;; isCollision boolean
    ;; detects if snake head has hit an object, apple obstacle
    (define (isCollision headSeg position)
        [and (= (posn-x (segment-position headSeg)) (posn-x position)) (= (posn-y (segment-position headSeg)) (posn-y position))]
    )
    
    ;; getInput 
    ;; handles game input-controlling snake
    (define (getInput event)
      (cond
        [(symbol? (send event get-key-code))
              (cond
                   [(string=? (symbol->string (send event get-key-code)) (symbol->string 'left))  (turnSnake 3)];(newline)(display "Key Press: left")]
                   [(string=? (symbol->string (send event get-key-code)) (symbol->string 'right)) (turnSnake 1)];(newline)(display "Key Press: right")]
                   [(string=? (symbol->string (send event get-key-code)) (symbol->string 'up))    (turnSnake 0)];(newline)(display "Key Press: up")]
                   [(string=? (symbol->string (send event get-key-code)) (symbol->string 'down))  (turnSnake 2)];(newline)(display "Key Press: down")]
              )]
        [(char? (send event get-key-code)) (display "key press: some key")]
      )
       ;;(display "Key event happend")
    )
    
    ;; turnSnake
    ;; decides if the snake can turn to a direction
    (define (turnSnake dir)
      (cond
        [(and (or (= dir 0) (= dir 2)) (or (= DIRECTION 1) (= DIRECTION 3))) (set! DIRECTION dir)]
        [(and (or (= dir 1) (= dir 3)) (or (= DIRECTION 0) (= DIRECTION 2))) (set! DIRECTION dir)]
      )
    
    )
    
    ;; moveSnake
    ;; moves snake to a new position based on direction
    (define (moveSnake)
      (cond
        [(= DIRECTION 0) (set! SNAKE_HEAD (shuffleSeg SNAKE_HEAD (make-posn (posn-x (segment-position SNAKE_HEAD)) (+ (posn-y (segment-position SNAKE_HEAD)) -10))))]
        [(= DIRECTION 1) (set! SNAKE_HEAD (shuffleSeg SNAKE_HEAD (make-posn (+ (posn-x (segment-position SNAKE_HEAD)) 10) (posn-y (segment-position SNAKE_HEAD)))))]
        [(= DIRECTION 2) (set! SNAKE_HEAD (shuffleSeg SNAKE_HEAD (make-posn (posn-x (segment-position SNAKE_HEAD)) (+ (posn-y (segment-position SNAKE_HEAD)) 10))))]
        [(= DIRECTION 3) (set! SNAKE_HEAD (shuffleSeg SNAKE_HEAD (make-posn (+ (posn-x (segment-position SNAKE_HEAD)) -10) (posn-y (segment-position SNAKE_HEAD)))))]
        )
    )
    
    ;; hasDied boolean
    ;; runs several collision detection functions, and returns #t if hit some sort of bound
    ;; and #f is you are still ok
    (define (hasDied)
      (cond
        [(> (posn-x (segment-position SNAKE_HEAD)) 330) #t]
        [(< (posn-x (segment-position SNAKE_HEAD)) 0) #t]
        [(> (posn-y (segment-position SNAKE_HEAD)) 190) #t]
        [(< (posn-y (segment-position SNAKE_HEAD)) 0) #t]
        [(isCollisionSeg (segment-next SNAKE_HEAD)) (newline)(display "Hah! What kind of worm eats itself?") #t]
        [else #f]
      )
    )
    
    ;; isCollisionSeg boolean
    ;; checks that head hasn't collided with the body segments
    (define (isCollisionSeg checkSeg)
      (cond
        [(and (= (posn-x (segment-position SNAKE_HEAD)) (posn-x (segment-position checkSeg))) 
              (= (posn-y (segment-position SNAKE_HEAD)) (posn-y (segment-position checkSeg))))
              #t]
        [(= (segment-isnextnull checkSeg) 0) (isCollisionSeg (segment-next checkSeg))]
        [else #f]
       )
    )
    
    ;; main program
    ;; create window with drawing canvas
    ;; then enter the main game loop
    (define (main)
        (define (lastPos)(make-posn 0 0))
        (set! SNAKE_HEAD (make-segment (make-posn 30 20) 0 1))
        (set! SNAKE_HEAD (appendSeg SNAKE_HEAD (make-posn 20 20)))
        (set! SNAKE_HEAD (appendSeg SNAKE_HEAD (make-posn 10 20)))
    
      
        
        (do ((STOP 0))
           ((= STOP 1))
           ;; .. start game functions
           ;(display "Looping")
                (set! lastPos (getTailSeg SNAKE_HEAD)) ; get current tail position incase we add a segment
                (moveSnake) ; change snake position
                (renderGame dc) ; draw board, apple and snake
                (cond [(isCollision SNAKE_HEAD APPLE) (set! SNAKE_HEAD (appendSeg SNAKE_HEAD lastPos)) (newline)(display "Ate an Apple!") (set! SCORE (+ SCORE 40))]) ; if you hit an apple, grow
          
           (send msg set-label (string-append "Points:" (number->string SCORE)))
           (set! SCORE (+ SCORE 1));; one point for every round you are alive
           (sleep/yield .15);; allow time for events to happen
           ;; .. end game functions
           (cond [(or (not (send frame is-shown?)) (hasDied)) (set! STOP 1)]);; loop until the frame is closed
        )
        (newline)(display "Score: ")(display SCORE)
        (cond
          [(< SCORE 399) (display " Kinda pathetic, don't ya think?")]
          [(< SCORE 400) (display " Hey, looks like you learned the game.")]
          [(< SCORE 1400) (display " Gettin better, But my grandma is still better then you.")]
          [(< SCORE 2400) (display " Alright! Finally, Some competition has arrived.")]
          [(< SCORE 3400) (display " Hey, you're doing great!")]
          [(< SCORE 4000) (display " Seriously, Fantastic!")]
          [(< SCORE 8000) (display " You Win!")]
          [else (display " Holy, freakin, cow, dude--You are awsome")]
         )
    )
    
    
    
    
    
    ;; Show the frame
    (send frame show #t) 
    ;; Wait a second to let the window get ready
    (sleep/yield 1)
    
    (main)
    (send frame show #f)
      )
    You can get scheme (pretty darn small, incredibly fun) at
    http://www.drscheme.org/
    BTW, here was the MrED documentation i used for syntax reference
    http://download.plt-scheme.org/doc/2...mred/mred.html

    I'm working on creating a random kind of function to seed the apple position, but other then that, this game is done.
    c++->visualc++->directx->opengl->c++;
    (it should be realized my posts are all in a light hearted manner. And should not be taken offense to.)

  2. #2
    l'Anziano DavidP's Avatar
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    dude that is awesome. and i agree with you, all you need is the syntax reference and some api reference, and you can code away. that's how i learned C#.

    anyways...

    the only LISP function i know are car, cdr, and like some other stuff...

    but i didnt see you use any of those...

    i heard LISP is good for AI, and since you now know LISP, you can give us all a good essay on why it is.

    Is it anything like Prolog? I have recently been learning all about schemes, facts, rules, queries, and such with Prolog.
    My Website

    "Circular logic is good because it is."

  3. #3
    Administrator webmaster's Avatar
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    Very nice. A more LISP-style version would probably use a bunch of mapcar's in place of your recursive functions and use a LISP-style list rather than a linked list of segment positions. Collision detection could be cleaner if you just used the member function to check if the position you are trying to move to is a member of the segment list. Also, your shuffle function could be much cleaner: you'd just need to cons on the new position of the head and remove the last element of the list each turn (rather than doing the same thing manually). This also avoids the need to remake each point every time.

    I'm not sure I completely agree with the concept that a programmer should be able to pick up any language simply with a language reference. If that's the case, then you're only using the same tools with different syntax -- but the syntax of LISP is not what makes it interesting (it's what makes people hate it). LISP is a functional language, and using it to write procedural programs doesn't really expand your programming toolbox. Also, more broadly, different languages have different idiomatic structures that you won't pick up simply from a language reference. (This is especially true when you are moving between programming styles -- LISP's list-oriented methodology is a very different way of handling data than using arrays. You could think of it as a combination of linked lists and binary trees.)

    DavidP: As I understand it, LISP has several advantages in some forms of AI. First, recursion and lists are ideally suited for some forms of knowledge representation -- particularly graphs and tree structures. LISP is also an easier language to program rapidly within: you don't have to worry about declaring variables, the syntax is extremely simple: almost everything is a list, and lists are composed of atoms or other lists. Also, functions are first-class variables -- you can pass them to other functions, and basically treat them as though they were any other class of variable. This can be extremely convenient -- say you have this list of objects and you know that you want to do something to this list, but you don't know what. You can just have your function accept an argument that is the function you want to call on the list, rather than have to set up a block of conditional statements that you must modify every time you want to add a new function to your list of functions you could call. You could do the same thing, of course, with function pointers in C++, but it's much cleaner in Lisp. (Indeed, it's also possible to specify nameless functions that you can pass to functions directly in the code. This can be pretty handy because you can create the function based on arguments to another function, which is conceptually clean.) When used purely functionally -- i.e., no setting variables -- you're working with code that's easier to prove is correct. (As a functional programming langauge, LISP is designed to be composed entirely of functions that do not change their arguments, and the entire program should be one function that takes an input and spits back an output -- there are no variable states you have to deal with that complicate showing the correctness of code. Yes, it's apparently possible even to do I/O in a purely functional way; I'm not sure if this is possible in LISP, however.) Among some of LISP's other convenient features are type checking and garbage collection, which frees the programmer from some of the low-level details that can be tedious if you're more interesting in the logic of your code than the implementation details of the language. (Which is presumably the case for most AI programmers; otherwise, they'd be writing operating systems.)

    On the other hand, Lisp isn't necessarily better for all sorts of AI. If you're doing robotics, you might want to interface with the hardware using C. If you need more speed, you might also want to use C for a specific implementation. If you're doing machine learning, a procedural language might be more intuitive since you would probably be doing more iterative programming with internal states (run through a bunch of training examples and update variables).

  4. #4
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    you sure know your stuff webmaster. I was looking into doing LISP this year as a part of my senior project but I decided against it. I want to know if what i wanted to do is even possible. I wanted to program the actual AI instructions of simulated bots in a computer program using the LISP programming language. I wanted to then export that to a DLL, and access it from the main program (written in C++). I downloaded a corman LISP compiler, and I thought that it said you could export the binary into a dll, but I never actually learned if/how it could be done.

    Have you heard of the 'd' programming language? I think it treats functions similarly, i.e as 'first - class variables' that can be passed as arguments to other functions, etc.

    EDIT:
    because im not using LISP, the bot AI itself is done with operation codes and a simple instrution set with an instruction pointer to direct the sequence of actions that it takes. this stuff is typed into a file and interpreted by the main program.
    Last edited by Silvercord; 03-31-2004 at 11:00 AM.

  5. #5
    mov.w #$1337,D0 Jeremy G's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by webmaster
    Very nice. A more LISP-style version would probably use a bunch of mapcar's in place of your recursive functions and use a LISP-style list rather than a linked list of segment positions. Collision detection could be cleaner if you just used the member function to check if the position you are trying to move to is a member of the segment list. Also, your shuffle function could be much cleaner: you'd just need to cons on the new position of the head and remove the last element of the list each turn (rather than doing the same thing manually). This also avoids the need to remake each point every time.
    I'm sure you are quite right. I only worked on this thing for a day and I'm very new to LISP. I hope to be able to refine it later when I have clearer understanding of most lisp functions. Take for example the DO loop, I got the defined format from the documentation and "winged" a working parameter set and conditional. There are a ton more complex things I can do with the DO, I know that for a fact--but the documentation isn't too comprehensive. If I can find a nice web resource for LISP programming (not documentation) perhaps you know of, I'd be greatful.
    I'm not sure I completely agree with the concept that a programmer should be able to pick up any language simply with a language reference. If that's the case, then you're only using the same tools with different syntax -- but the syntax of LISP is not what makes it interesting (it's what makes people hate it).
    Again you are right here. However, I was readily trying to say that you can program >in< the language. The ability to program >with< using the unique idioms a language has to offer is the mark of a great programmer. For my game I looked at it from the point of view: How can I do something in lisp to mimmick how id do it in c++? When I should more likely should have been thinking: How can I solve this problem with Lisp? While the two statment have overlapping grey areas of meaning and interpritation, the primary focus of each is what you have pointed it out. Doing it in lisp using lisp philosophy's solution would be very different from doing it in lisp using structural c++ philosophy.

    I'm in agreement so much as to rephrase what you said, like it was my idea...

    So any ways, I hope to be able to post a refined version later, but i've just been inspired (not just, before I posted this actually) to make a shooter game. You know, Like area 51 at the aracades? Bitmaps popup behind crates and you shoot them before they shoot you!

    Btw, I'm seeking a method to do a rand() function in LISP (DrScheme version). Do you know of a function call for random, or a general lisp version of creating Random()? Also please list any site with lisp info, that would be very helpful.
    c++->visualc++->directx->opengl->c++;
    (it should be realized my posts are all in a light hearted manner. And should not be taken offense to.)

  6. #6
    Administrator webmaster's Avatar
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    You might try MIT's introductory website: http://sicp.ai.mit.edu/Spring-2004/ -- I think they have a link to an online textbook that uses Scheme. I'm not sure how good it is, though.

    (Also, it might be good for the purposes of syntax discussions to point out that LISP and Scheme are a little bit different -- I know in that (at least some implementations of) Common Lisp there is a function named random (random MAX_VAL) I think, but I'm not sure if it's available in Scheme.)

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