Source Code and Employers

This is a discussion on Source Code and Employers within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; Hi, I often see job adds that mention that the programmers should bring along source code of past projects. In ...

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    Source Code and Employers

    Hi,

    I often see job adds that mention that the programmers should bring along source code of past projects.

    In sum, what if employers were to make copies of the source code and then turn around and not hire you?

    Kuphryn

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    PC Fixer-Upper Waldo2k2's Avatar
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    You could sue them for $$$ if you could prove they stole it.

    But, companies do do shady things sometimes, so watch yourself on what you bring in. Just give them a taste.
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    Xei
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    You can present finished, compiled products. Do not bring full source. If they want to see whether your coding follows their standards then give them a sample.

    Thats my opinion, anyways. Ask adrianxw, he's the professional.
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    5|-|1+|-|34|) ober's Avatar
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    I have never been asked to provide a portfolio or examples of my past projects and I have been interviewed by several big companies (Lockheed Martin, Mack Trucks (aka Volvo Powertrain)) and I now work for Mack.

    If I ever had to show my past projects to someone, I would show them finished projects, never source code, and I would never leave it with them. That stuff is copyrighted by you. They have no rights to it unless you write it on their time (read: PAID time).

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    Still A Registered User DISGUISED's Avatar
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    Originally posted by ober5861
    I have never been asked to provide a portfolio or examples of my past projects and I have been interviewed by several big companies (Lockheed Martin, Mack Trucks (aka Volvo Powertrain)) and I now work for Mack.
    Ditto that. You’re more likely to have to take a proficiency exam than you are to be asked to produce source code. How would they know you are the one who actually wrote it?

    I have been asked to describe projects that I have worked on and that's about it.

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    5|-|1+|-|34|) ober's Avatar
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    Originally posted by DISGUISED
    Ditto that. You’re more likely to have to take a proficiency exam than you are to be asked to produce source code. How would they know you are the one who actually wrote it?

    I have been asked to describe projects that I have worked on and that's about it.
    Exactly. You could bring your brother's step-dad's code in from an MS project and they'd never know the difference.

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    It's full of stars adrianxw's Avatar
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    I have never asked for people to bring code to interviews. I have had students fresh from university bring portfolios of work with them - it seems the universitys tell them it is a good idea. Out of courtesy - i've flipped through a page or two - but what? I'm expected to read all this stuff? Like I have time for that?

    There is no guarantee that the code was written by the individual. Certainly - I would take a very dim veiw of any employee of mine taking source code to another company from mine - other companies would appreciate that. (Unless they were trying for a real cheap shot at industrial espionage!). Lot of plaes you'd have signed a nopn-disclosure agreement anyway - get yourself sued.

    As for coding style - doesn't matter what/how you did it before - almost all code shops have a coding standard and if you work there - then you do it that way - failure to do so will inevitably be discovered by the Quality System somewhere and if your lucky, you'll have enough time in the project timetable to correct it - if not, then the project will slip and you'll get the blame for it.
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