Have you ever had a four dimensional experience

This is a discussion on Have you ever had a four dimensional experience within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; yea...

  1. #31
    The Earth is not flat. Clyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    1,420
    yea

  2. #32
    C++ Developer XSquared's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,718
    What a waste of a post.
    Naturally I didn't feel inspired enough to read all the links for you, since I already slaved away for long hours under a blistering sun pressing the search button after typing four whole words! - Quzah

    You. Fetch me my copy of the Wall Street Journal. You two, fight to the death - Stewie

  3. #33
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    1,708
    recursive hypocrisy.

    anyway clyde do you get taught a lot of abstract concepts in chemistry (string theory and multiple dimensions and 'stuff' like that)

    if not what's the most abstract/complex problems you've had to solve?

  4. #34
    The Earth is not flat. Clyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    1,420
    anyway clyde do you get taught a lot of abstract concepts in chemistry (string theory and multiple dimensions and 'stuff' like that)
    Not really, well ok we did have multi-dimensional space in chemometrics where you consider data to be points in variable space with as many dimensions as there are variables, and i suppose a lot of theoretical chem is pretty abstract. I guess chemistry is somewhere between bio, and phys in terms of abstract/mathematical vs. concrete ideas.

    not what's the most abstract/complex problems you've had to solve?
    Abstract/cool would be quantum mechanics; the behaviour of electrons (and other sub-atomic particles) including the heisenburg uncertainty principle is mind blowing stuff, it really changes the entire way you view the universe around you.

    Complex, well i couldn't put my finger on any one topic, in chemistry more so than physics or biology there is great variety in the kind of problems you have to solve, some people find some kinds easy others difficult, others vice versa.

    I suppose there are alot of ideas in theoretical/physical chem that are either poorly explained or just hard to understand (or both) that take quite a while to comprehend (unfortunately many people, in fact MOST people don't bother, they just learn some bits and work out how to answer the questions reasonably - What the heck is the point of an education in science if you do that!??).
    Last edited by Clyde; 08-18-2003 at 03:00 PM.

  5. #35
    Anti-Poster
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    1,399
    Originally posted by Silvercord
    well this has been fun!

    i had to have you guys assume the paper was actually a plane to convey a more abstract idea, when in actuality a piece of paper is as much a three dimensional entity as you and me.
    Aye, that's the part that threw me. How can something 4D affect something that exists in 3D? I don't know if I can affect anything in 2D, seeing as there is no 2D space anywhere in existance.
    If I did your homework for you, then you might pass your class without learning how to write a program like this. Then you might graduate and get your degree without learning how to write a program like this. You might become a professional programmer without knowing how to write a program like this. Someday you might work on a project with me without knowing how to write a program like this. Then I would have to do you serious bodily harm. - Jack Klein

  6. #36
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    1,708
    Clyde, I'm sorry to say but humble enough to admit that I was one of those people that had to just figure out how to do a type of problem based on what the teacher told us...whenever we had to do something that involved thinking I did poorly...and it was an honors class and actual thinking was involved a lot and I did poorly in that class I really didn't belong in honors

    Aye, that's the part that threw me. How can something 4D affect something that exists in 3D? I don't know if I can affect anything in 2D, seeing as there is no 2D space anywhere in existance.
    What about the infinite number of planes that inhabit, lets say, the room you are sitting in?

    Of course it's difficult to actually interact with 2d, but at the same time an infinite number of slices of yoru body exist on planes.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

Similar Threads

  1. Multi dimensional array
    By $l4xklynx in forum C Programming
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 01-03-2009, 03:56 AM
  2. Programming opportunities! (Midway Games, Inc)
    By Midwayrecruiter in forum Projects and Job Recruitment
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-20-2008, 12:02 PM
  3. Two dimensional array
    By George2 in forum C Programming
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-10-2007, 05:27 AM
  4. Are You An Experienced Programmer? Do You Like Football/soccer? (uk)
    By Mark Smulders in forum Projects and Job Recruitment
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-28-2007, 02:53 AM
  5. 32-bit ASM or COM :: Experience
    By kuphryn in forum Windows Programming
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-04-2002, 01:39 PM

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21