reading math symbols

This is a discussion on reading math symbols within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; i've been reading Elements of Abstract and Linear Algebra for a cryptology report. i have a basic highschool education in ...

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    Nor
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    reading math symbols

    i've been reading Elements of Abstract and Linear Algebra for a cryptology report.
    i have a basic highschool education in algebra, geometry, and a little trig.

    anyway i'm seeing lots of symbols i've never seen before.
    i cant cut and paste them .

    anyone know the names of these symbols or something i can use to find out more about them?
    Try to help all less knowledgeable than yourself, within
    the limits provided by time, complexity and tolerance.
    - Nor

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    & the hat of GPL slaying Thantos's Avatar
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    Most likely if you don't know what a symbol is you should take a class that covers that level of math.

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    take university level discrete math and linear algebra

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    the big funky E is the summation operator where you just add elements of an array together
    the ~ means approximately equal to (i.e trying to assign a value to an irrational number)
    the small e is the only number (rational or irrational, e is irrational) where the derivative of e^x is e^x (I think that's how it goes)

    e is:
    2.718281828459045235360287471352662497757247093699 95957

    and those are the first 3 relevant symbols I could think of that might be in your book

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    What symbols specifically? Can you point me to a chapter at least?
    "...the results are undefined, and we all know what "undefined" means: it means it works during development, it works during testing, and it blows up in your most important customers' faces." --Scott Meyers

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    It's full of stars adrianxw's Avatar
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    A good number of the operators are described in the first pages of chapter 1.
    Wave upon wave of demented avengers march cheerfully out of obscurity unto the dream.

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    Hamster without a wheel iain's Avatar
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    logic and discrete mathematics - a computer science perspective, i read it in maths in the first of uni. I forget the author but its a good book
    Monday - what a way to spend a seventh of your life

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    Nor
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    in chapter one. page one. right after the header Sets.
    there is an up side down 'u' and a right side up 'U'

    also "{x: E A and x E B"} E being the symbol i dont understand.

    a little more down (page 6) is an arrow pointing right.
    and then a little circule used like multiplacation, at the bottom of that page.

    these 5 symbols are used throught out the book and one only ones i dont understand.
    Try to help all less knowledgeable than yourself, within
    the limits provided by time, complexity and tolerance.
    - Nor

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    Crazy Fool Perspective's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Nor
    in chapter one. page one. right after the header Sets.
    there is an up side down 'u' and a right side up 'U'

    also "{x: E A and x E B"} E being the symbol i dont understand.

    a little more down (page 6) is an arrow pointing right.
    and then a little circule used like multiplacation, at the bottom of that page.

    these 5 symbols are used throught out the book and one only ones i dont understand.
    upside down 'U' : think of it as an 'and'
    rightside up 'U' : think of it as an 'or'
    small 'E' : 'element of'
    backwards 'E' : 'there exists'
    upside down 'A': 'for all'
    and the ' : 'not' (negation)


    >> {x: E A and x E B"}

    assuming the E's are small this means x is an element of A and x is an element of B.

    if you want better descriptions, look up "set theory" or "set notation"

    edit: edited stuff
    Last edited by Perspective; 08-08-2003 at 11:12 AM.

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    Nor
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    thank you so very much.
    also just found a book about the subject.
    Schaum's Outline of Discrete Mathematics (amazon.com)
    should be here within the next week
    http://www.sosmath.com/algebra/inequ...02/ineq02.html
    http://www.shu.edu/projects/reals/logic/notation.html
    http://directory.google.com/Top/Scie...t_Theory/?il=1
    Last edited by Nor; 08-08-2003 at 11:28 AM.
    Try to help all less knowledgeable than yourself, within
    the limits provided by time, complexity and tolerance.
    - Nor

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