What's next?

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  1. #1
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    What's next?

    I was thinking on what language to start.
    I only know C - and some very basics on C++ , and i want to sart a new language, if i find time, but i don't know which to choose. I have a book that is only an introduction to Java and an introduction to C++.
    I think Java would be a good opinion - although i don't have much resourses about it, if i search i might find - . Also scripting JavaScript might be nice, but i think i'll never use it. Or maybe C++ ?

    Anyway, what do you think?
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    ( Trying to be a good C Programmer )

  2. #2
    Pursuing knowledge confuted's Avatar
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    Learn C++.

    If you don't want to do that, Java would be the next best thing.
    Away.

  3. #3
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    You could also consider learning both C++ and Java. You know already the basics of C++, improve your knowledge of C++. And start with learning Java. Bruce Eckel has a nice book called "Thinking in Java", it is free for download. There's also "Thinking in C++".
    http://mindview.net/Books

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    Hmmm...
    I think i 'll read the intoduction to C++ and Java of my book ( my problem is that i don't have time!! ), and then, i'll continue with the language that will mostly catch my interest( and if i someday do aaaaaaaaalll this stuff i'll continue with the other language i left ) ...

    Basically, i wish to learn a language to use for fun. That's Java. To do some graphics and some other fun stuff in C/C++ you have to use non-standars functions ( that really SUCKS!! - i always avoid using non-stanard function ). Fortunately, Java enables me to do this kind of stuff.


    Shiro,
    Hey man, that link is REALLY GREAT!!!!!!
    I 've read some comments on the Java book, and all said that it is an amazing book!
    But, i don't want this book to be just an introduction. Do you know if it covers the WHOLE language??

    Also, what should i read: Thinking in Java, 3rd Edition, Final Version, or Thinking in Enterprise Java ??? What is the second book about?

    Also, if i want to do C++, i should download Thinking in C++, 2nd edition, Volume 2 Revision 18 . Right?

    Also what does Thinking in Patterns talk about?

    Again, many thanks! - Really cool page!
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    ( Trying to be a good C Programmer )

  5. #5
    ¡Amo fútbol!
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    First, you want to read thinking in Java. This will give you a good understanding of the language. Thinking in Enterprise Java is more geared towards people wanting to program Enterprise level apps (more with databases and other stuff used by large companies).

  6. #6
    Student Forever! bookworm's Avatar
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    Try C#.net
    Its the most powerful OOP based language I know of.

  7. #7
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    > Also, if i want to do C++, i should download Thinking in C++,
    > 2nd edition, Volume 2 Revision 18 . Right?

    The book Thinking in C++ consists of two volumes, volume 1 and volume 2. I'd suggest you download both. Volume 2 extends the knowledge you learned from volume 1.

    > Also what does Thinking in Patterns talk about?

    That is about design patterns. In object oriented design a large number of design problems appears again and again. Experienced designers have learned by experience that specific problems can be solved best in some specific way. If a specific solution proves to work in a lot of designs where the specific problem appeared, then it is called a pattern. So in short a pattern is a best way to solve some design problem. I haven't read the book, but I think it describes a number of such patterns and gives a more theoretical background of patterns.

    To learn more about design patterns:
    http://hillside.net/patterns/
    http://www.csc.calpoly.edu/~dbutler/...er96/patterns/

    Since you're starting learning object oriented languages and probably have no experience with object oriented design, this book might not yet be interesting to you. I've found patterns interesting after a course in object oriented design and doing some object oriented designing. Then you discover the value of patterns.

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