Chemtrails?

This is a discussion on Chemtrails? within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; >the camps were alittle extreme, but what other options did they have? it doesnt make it completly right, but do ...

  1. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    552
    >the camps were alittle extreme, but what other options did they have? it doesnt make it completly right, but do you think there was enough jails for them all? deporting them would of been better.

    Wow.... i dont even know how to respond to this.... Just curious, how old are you?
    C Code. C Code Run. Run Code Run... Please!

    "Love is like a blackhole, you fall into it... then you get ripped apart"

  2. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    913
    Wow.... i dont even know how to respond to this.... Just curious, how old are you?
    hmm... not sure if i should answer this one, ill pull a democrat.

    was any one even alive when this was happening? what are you(i mean, are you japense or not)?

    im sure it was worse than it sounds, but from what was mentioned it seem like the worst thing was coming home.

  3. #18
    Pursuing knowledge confuted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    1,916
    I'm sure that there were probably suspicious Japanese who may have had intentions that would have cost American lives. However, these people were far from the majority. Think about it like this - World War II had only been waging for a few years (without US involvement) at the time of the Pearl Harbor attack. The Japanese had invaded Manchuria in 1931, and then attacked China in an undeclared war again in 1937. They didn't join the Axis Powers until late 1940, and didn't attack the US until Dec. 1941. They were allied with us in 1914 for WWI. So, it's quite obvious that aggressions weren't planned against the US for more than a few years before they happened. In fact, it was probably significantly less. How many people who had lived in the United States for generations, loved the country, and hadn't had any contact with people from Japan in their entire lives do you think would have done something against the United States? They might have even joined the war effort in some way in order to prove to their country that not all Japanese people were rampant imperialists. Instead, they went to camps - even the ones who were in no way suspicious other than by nature of their genetics. I'm talking about citizens, not illegal immigrants. What ever happened to "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal" or "In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed" (Amendment 6) or "Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted." (Amendment 8) or any of the laws against racial discrimination and holding people without a charge? Here's the 14th amendment...
    All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.
    I think that's a good one. I like it. I think we should have followed it. It was ratified in 1868, it seems that our politicians would have been familiar with it by 1941. We're a nation of immigrants. Personally, most of my ancestors came from Germany. Why weren't any of my ancestors imprisoned during WWII? We were fighting Germany... Oh yeah. This country is full of Germans, and they don't look different than the rest of the population. It would be harder to find and isolate them. I'm glad that I've never been imprisoned because I'm a caucasian male who is 3/4 German and 1/4 Norwegian. It seems right, fair, and just. I don't think that the detainment of Arab-Americans at airports is right either. If there is a question, I fall back on the phrase "all men are created equal and are endowed by their creater with certain inalienable rights." Given 5 people - one white, one black, one asian, one indian, and one hispanic - all dressed identically so that they could not be judged by that, and knowing nothing about any of them, which one is more likely to commit murder? I definitely don't know; it depends not on race, but on personality and motive.

    Not sure what you meant by the "admitting it" thing when I referenced democrats, but for clarity, if you haven't realized it, I'm not a democrat. I'm conservative, but I feel that there are errors within all of the parties, and that the Republicans and Democrats are practically the same party. But that is the topic for another thread. Perhaps after we're done with this one.
    Away.

  4. #19
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    913
    yeah, the democrat part was just a bad joke. later on i have to hear about how republicans and democrats are the same(sure they both screw up, but republicans do it less).

    im not excusing it, but i can see why there was fear. there still a chance that some japenese nationalism could come out of no where.

    buts its like what you said, there is more germans in the us. we know them, so we dont fear them. plus germans seem alittle more american that japanese. theres nothing wrong with, but with the (very) few ive meet there was a big difference.

    a sense of fear back then was natural and could of been predicted. but we did goto some extremes. but thats not really "cruel and immoral", its more half-a$$ed.

    im surprised we havent done more with immigration now. we dont need the contaiment camps but im surprised i have heard of mass deportations.

  5. #20
    Toaster Zach L.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    2,686
    Japanese-Americans were denied their basic rights as US Citizens when they were interned (illegal search and seizure, imprisonment without trial, the list goes on). Those are rights guaranteed to all Americans under the Constitution.

    The government, by interning the Japanese, asserted its 'right' to revoke its founding principles simply because people were afraid of what others looked like. That is no way to run a civilized country, and the dehumanization of Japanese during that time most if not physically cruel (which it was... conditions were poor, and many people were packed into relatively small camps), it was certainly cruel mentally.

    These were ordinary citizens of the US, like many of us here. They had done nothing to evoke such punishment except to be born with the wrong DNA.
    The word rap as it applies to music is the result of a peculiar phonological rule which has stripped the word of its initial voiceless velar stop.

  6. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    913
    in war time its not breaking anything.

    it would of been alright it they were new to the country but going back that many years isnt. but its expected. we did what we thought at the time would protect us. the new immigrants had no right to object to it but the older ones did.

    any one have anything that is "cruel and immoral"?

  7. #22
    Toaster Zach L.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    2,686
    Umm... The Constitution is there to protect US citizens, whether it be in time of peace or war. And why did new immigrants have no right to object? Are they not 'American' enough? Again, fear may have motivated these actions, but it does not justify them.

    Just out of curiosity, what do you consider "cruel and immoral"?
    The word rap as it applies to music is the result of a peculiar phonological rule which has stripped the word of its initial voiceless velar stop.

  8. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    913
    The Constitution is there to protect US citizens, whether it be in time of peace or war.
    now i have to look up the exception. i dont remember if it only worked the once or was actually written in. any one know what im thing off here?

    Are they not 'American' enough?
    yes, they are not.

    Just out of curiosity, what do you consider "cruel and immoral"?
    hitler-style things. i guess you could compare our camps to hitlers ghettos.

  9. #24
    Toaster Zach L.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    2,686
    The Constitution cannot legally be suspended (nor any part of it).

    So how would you define someone who is American enough to enjoy the rights of a US citizen?

    Well, if you only consider homicidal/genocidal practices as cruel and immoral, I suppose that the Japanese internment is not the best example, but there are others in our history.
    The word rap as it applies to music is the result of a peculiar phonological rule which has stripped the word of its initial voiceless velar stop.

  10. #25
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    913
    but there are others in our history.
    such as? im not denying it, but something besides slavery please.

  11. #26
    Toaster Zach L.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    2,686
    Didn't think of that one. At any rate, the expansion across the continent, and killing and transplanting of Native Americans.

    In more recent history, however, the US has supported many ruthless tyrants through some of their most dispicable acts: Hussein, Suharto, Noriega, et al.
    The word rap as it applies to music is the result of a peculiar phonological rule which has stripped the word of its initial voiceless velar stop.

  12. #27
    Toaster Zach L.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    2,686
    On a side note, I'm not anti-American, as you may think. I just think people need to be held accountable, and policies need to change.
    The word rap as it applies to music is the result of a peculiar phonological rule which has stripped the word of its initial voiceless velar stop.

  13. #28
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    913
    im not refering any one as anti-american. i thought i would but its been a ok thread so far.

    as for "native [I]americans[I]", i live by alot of them(im not one). the one thing i hate about this is what did they expect? we didnt have tea partys when we wanted land in europe why would we want one in north america?

    as soon as we got one shore we didnt just open fire. we wanted land like every one else did. sure, a couple of our guys started fights or were asking for them, but they werent saints either. we had guns, they didnt, we got the job done more offen. plus this was before america.

  14. #29
    Toaster Zach L.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    2,686
    I was referring more to expansion west in the mid 1800's to early 1900's.

    im not refering any one as anti-american. i thought i would but its been a ok thread so far.
    I know you're not... I just stated my last point a bit more strongly than I intended.
    The word rap as it applies to music is the result of a peculiar phonological rule which has stripped the word of its initial voiceless velar stop.

  15. #30
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    913
    you mean like manifest destany?

    what was "cruel and immoral"?

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21