I want nothing more than to take calculus

This is a discussion on I want nothing more than to take calculus within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; I think we are arguing semantics here, but oh well. In the problem, x isn't 'going' anywhere. Its a fixed ...

  1. #46
    Toaster Zach L.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    2,686
    I think we are arguing semantics here, but oh well.

    In the problem, x isn't 'going' anywhere. Its a fixed value. So, the limit of the function as x goes to infinity happens to be a good approximation, but is still not exact at that point.
    The word rap as it applies to music is the result of a peculiar phonological rule which has stripped the word of its initial voiceless velar stop.

  2. #47
    Just because ygfperson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    2,493
    if you can figure out:

    (56x^6+48x^5-14x^4+468x^3+45x^2+189x-189)/(2x^6+18x^5-48x^4+165x^3-59x^2-486x+48)

    assuming x==489488436498899878648897898 then you're good for calculus...

    btw... the answer is around 28... (limits)
    Yes, you're right. I forgot to actually read the problem as it was posted...

  3. #48
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    1,708
    Well, I just wanted to say it is official I am taking pre calculus right now over the summer and taking calculus senior year. I also obtained a few math books, one of which is called "Calculus and pizza" and I'm actually reading about calculating instantaneous velocity and stuff. Pretty cool.

  4. #49
    Toaster Zach L.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    2,686
    Sounds fun. Good luck with that.

    I think the author of that book had his priorities backwards though... Clearly pizza should come first!
    The word rap as it applies to music is the result of a peculiar phonological rule which has stripped the word of its initial voiceless velar stop.

  5. #50
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    1,708
    lol zach, true true. Coincidentally I was at a bookstore while my mom and sister were ordering pizza from pizza hut, and I saw this book

  6. #51
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    18
    How far have you gone in this book?

    Because the hardest stuff in calculus is most definately Series Error and the LaGrange Method is the only way to go.

    Plus I also just finished AP Calculus and I've been waiting for a month on my test results.

    My teacher worked our class like dogs and I thought Calc was equally hard as Physics *insert giant laugh*
    I need MONEY more than help with My C++ so yeah you get the idea

    C notes preferably LOL

  7. #52
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    1,708
    page 13

  8. #53
    Toaster Zach L.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    2,686
    >>> Because the hardest stuff in calculus is most definately Series Error and the LaGrange Method is the only way to go.

    Wait until you get into some more calculus. Partial diff-eq's are quite "fun".
    The word rap as it applies to music is the result of a peculiar phonological rule which has stripped the word of its initial voiceless velar stop.

  9. #54
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    1,708
    well holy crap I've got to learn to crawl before I can build interplanetary self destructing atomic terminal node warheads

  10. #55
    and the Hat of Clumsiness GanglyLamb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    between photons and phonons
    Posts
    1,109
    >>Wait until you get into some more calculus. Partial diff-eq's are quite "fun".

    Partials can be a real pain in the ass. I mean there are even Partials that cant be solved... like we have this TI-92 and in school we always used to type in these very complex partials and then let the machine worj it out, and then see wich calculator took the longest.

  11. #56
    Just because ygfperson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    2,493
    Originally posted by Silvercord
    well holy crap I've got to learn to crawl before I can build interplanetary self destructing atomic terminal node warheads
    Just relax...it's all going to be very easy so long as you understand something, at least in theory before moving on.

  12. #57
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    1,708
    What's so special about the number 'e'. How are base e logarithms useful. Isn't e an irrational number (like pi) that goes on forever? and isnt' it something like 2.71.....

    EDIT: and they showed how to find the instantaneous velocity of a falling piece of pizza using derivaties. From what I read derivaties are just new functions that can represent slope when no time has passed (because otherwise it is an illegal divide by zero). I was confused because when they were creating the derivative they integrated functions or something and I didn't know what they were doing. But the books shows a shortcut for calculating the derivative:

    F(x) = (x^n) is the original
    F(x) = (nx^n-1) is the derivative

    Were you all shown this?
    Last edited by Silvercord; 06-20-2003 at 02:13 PM.

  13. #58
    Pursuing knowledge confuted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    1,916
    Yes, that's called the power rule, and works only when n is a constant - not if it's variable. They weren't integrating, they were taking the limit of a difference quotient (slope) as h approached 0. I hope you read about limits before you started derivatives...

    e is a special number. It is the only number k where k^x is its own derivative. (e^x)'=e^x (note the prime on the left side) There's a big long elaborate proof for getting e, but since you're just starting, you wouldn't understand it (it's probably in your book anyway) The slope of e^x at x=1 is e. The slope of e^x at x=2 is e^2, etc. If that reason doesn't make sense to you yet, think of it like this: it's easier to write ln(x) than log(x), so just do it and learn why later
    Away.

  14. #59
    Toaster Zach L.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    2,686
    e... 2.718281828459045 (off the top of my head)

    Only two functions are the same as there derivatives:
    f(x) = e^x
    f(x) = 0

    And there are other reasons why e is important (as you'll see when you get to the definition of ln). Plus, the definition of e, stated informally (rather poorly actually) is 1 to the infinite power.

    More technically,

    e = lim [x->0] (1 + x)^(1/x)
    The word rap as it applies to music is the result of a peculiar phonological rule which has stripped the word of its initial voiceless velar stop.

  15. #60
    Just because ygfperson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    2,493
    EDIT: and they showed how to find the instantaneous velocity of a falling piece of pizza using derivaties.
    lol... I just remembered you got that pizza calculus book.

    From what I read derivaties are just new functions that can represent slope when no time has passed (because otherwise it is an illegal divide by zero).
    You have the idea. You'll get the grand scheme soon enough.
    I was confused because when they were creating the derivative they integrated functions or something and I didn't know what they were doing. But the books shows a shortcut for calculating the derivative:
    F(x) = (x^n) is the original
    F(x) = (nx^n-1) is the derivative

    Were you all shown this?
    Yes. Just remember that it's important to grasp the idea behind derivatives before you learn the easier formulas. That's why they do it that way: so you know why something happens before knowing an easier way to get there. Knowing why is essential to more difficult stuff.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

Similar Threads

  1. Using calculus w/o knowing it
    By VirtualAce in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 12-26-2005, 11:11 AM
  2. I like calculus
    By Silvercord in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 05-11-2004, 08:38 PM
  3. calculus problem: motion
    By Silvercord in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-10-2003, 10:56 AM
  4. Anyone want to part with a Calculus Text?
    By FillYourBrain in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-09-2002, 07:46 AM
  5. Calculus on C?
    By Lynux-Penguin in forum C Programming
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-27-2002, 07:06 PM

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21