What do these words have in common?

This is a discussion on What do these words have in common? within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; This is extra credit at my school: What do these words have in common? DOOR, FRY, HORN, PASTRY, TOAST, WINDOW ...

  1. #1
    Registered User deltabird's Avatar
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    What do these words have in common?

    This is extra credit at my school: What do these words have in common?

    DOOR, FRY, HORN, PASTRY, TOAST, WINDOW

    Anybody know it?

  2. #2
    Xei
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    They are each names used to define an object.

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    napKINfolk.com napkin111's Avatar
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    Do you mean the objects the words represent or the words (letters) themselves?

    //napKIN

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    Back after 2 years Panopticon's Avatar
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    They are all words.
    I AM WINNER!!!1!111oneoneomne

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    They all contain at least one vowel.
    "...the results are undefined, and we all know what "undefined" means: it means it works during development, it works during testing, and it blows up in your most important customers' faces." --Scott Meyers

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    French.

    French Door, French Fry, French Horn, French Pastry, French Toast, French Window.

  7. #7
    Xei
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    Originally posted by alpha
    French.

    French Door, French Fry, French Horn, French Pastry, French Toast, French Window.
    Yup, the answer must be French! :P

  8. #8
    train spotter
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    MrWizard>>They all contain at least one vowel.<<

    what is the vowel in FRY?
    "Man alone suffers so excruciatingly in the world that he was compelled to invent laughter."
    Friedrich Nietzsche

    "I spent a lot of my money on booze, birds and fast cars......the rest I squandered."
    George Best

    "If you are going through hell....keep going."
    Winston Churchill

  9. #9
    mov.w #$1337,D0 Jeremy G's Avatar
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    y is known to be counter-changeable between a vowel and constanant.
    c++->visualc++->directx->opengl->c++;
    (it should be realized my posts are all in a light hearted manner. And should not be taken offense to.)

  10. #10
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    Easy on the French! <sarcasm>You could just as easily say global-hegemonic door, global-hegemonic fry, global-hegemonic horn, global-hegemonic pastry,global-hegemonic toast, and global-hegemonic window and all in one breath (if you have the speed and lung capacity).</sarcasm>

    dbgt goten wrote:
    y is known the be counter-changeable between a vowel and constanant.
    Letters are letters. Spoken sounds are consonants, vowels, and everything in between.

  11. #11
    train spotter
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    >>y is known to be counter-changeable between a vowel and constanant.

    When I was taught English in the dark ages, there were 5 vowels and 21 constants.

    Y was a constant (even though in some cases it 'acted' as a vowel).
    "Man alone suffers so excruciatingly in the world that he was compelled to invent laughter."
    Friedrich Nietzsche

    "I spent a lot of my money on booze, birds and fast cars......the rest I squandered."
    George Best

    "If you are going through hell....keep going."
    Winston Churchill

  12. #12
    Unleashed
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    You sound the horn as your car is sliding through somebody's house window, and you take out the cupard full of pastries. You go through the wall into the next room where you go sliding door-first into a fireplace where you toast the car and fry like an egg.
    The world is waiting. I must leave you now.

  13. #13
    It's full of stars adrianxw's Avatar
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    There is no doubting the nature of "Y" here, it is a vowel, the vowels in Danish are A, E, I, O, U, Y, , and . The other letters are consonants except W which does not appear in the Danish alphabet and C is a little dubious. My wife and I spent some time discussing it, and although school children are taught the alphabet with C, we do not believe that has always been the case.
    Wave upon wave of demented avengers march cheerfully out of obscurity unto the dream.

  14. #14
    thinking
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    Door -> Window
    Fry -> toast
    Horn -> pastry (for a moment i thought i was onto something)

  15. #15
    It's full of stars adrianxw's Avatar
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    We have a type of pastry which translated would be a "Cream Horn"...
    Wave upon wave of demented avengers march cheerfully out of obscurity unto the dream.

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