"Patenting" math formulas or something like that

This is a discussion on "Patenting" math formulas or something like that within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; I figured out a few math formulas for doing certain functions (I don't want to be specific, so my formulas ...

  1. #1
    Registered User deltabird's Avatar
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    "Patenting" math formulas or something like that

    I figured out a few math formulas for doing certain functions (I don't want to be specific, so my formulas are not stolen!). I searched the net for formulas just like the ones I figured out, but couldn't find anything. Also, I don't know of any like them.

    Does anyone know what I can do to coin a math formula or somehow claim credit for it?

    Ok ok, I know this sounds so stupid, because there's hardly much more formulas to make!

    But anyhow, what can I do?

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    Mayor of Awesometown Govtcheez's Avatar
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    Tell me what they are and I'll see if they've been discovered already.

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    RoD
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    Redundantly Redundant RoD's Avatar
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    contact the patent office? :P Watch maybe nasa will come break your legs for uncovering their hidden formula :P

  4. #4
    CS Author and Instructor
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    Cool

    You can probably get credit for the names of your formula. I do not think you can patent math formulas. Think about it - does Fermat or Heron (or kin) get a royalty for every time some uses the formula they are credited with--I highly doubt it!!!

    Check the patent office on what can be patent and what cannot. Use a google search.
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    Just because ygfperson's Avatar
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    I seriously doubt it. Did Andrew Wiles get a patent for proving Fermat's Last Theorem?

    Besides, it's math. Math is very abstract. Chances are someone else will find it, too, independantly. And a patent wouldn't be fair to them. Or to the mathematical community at large.

    What area of math does your function deal with?

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    Registered User deltabird's Avatar
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    I really do think that this is something somebody has already done before, but it has to do with numerically reversing the digits of a number (Would you even call this a formula?).

    I really don't even see how it's useful, but I figured out how to do it myself.

    Anyone seen anything like this before?

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    RoD
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    u mean

    1<--2<--3

    is reverse of 3? ::math moron::

  8. #8
    Registered User deltabird's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    ....no, I'm not sure what you meant by that

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    You mean like...

    if (reverse(123) == 321)
    cout << "Hi!" << endl;

    Im absolutely positive someone has done this before
    C Code. C Code Run. Run Code Run... Please!

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  10. #10
    Registered User deltabird's Avatar
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    well sure it'd be easy to do it with programming, but with just numbers i mean.

    Like could you make a graph of x and y where x is a number and y is its reverse? (using say a graphing calculator)

  11. #11
    cereal killer dP munky's Avatar
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    no, you CAN patent a formula, i know that when nintendo software technology made wave race blue storm, that the waves in the water were some form of patented sin wave...

    you can go HERE sign up for the 1 week free trial, and search for granted patents
    Last edited by dP munky; 02-22-2003 at 02:00 AM.
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  12. #12
    Programming Sex-God Polymorphic OOP's Avatar
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    Originally posted by deltabird
    Like could you make a graph of x and y where x is a number and y is its reverse? (using say a graphing calculator)
    In order to allow it to account for all numbers, you'd have to use a form of mathematical recursion, at least thats the only way I can think of right now. If you somehow did find a way without it, then i'd be impressed (though logically, I can't imagine it as being a possibility). If not, this has been done already.

  13. #13
    Just because ygfperson's Avatar
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    Something like that would be specific to base 10. Which implies that you would be using some expanded form of the number; ie: 3*10^2 + 2*10^1 + 1*10^0

    You're saying that with addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and god knows what else, you can reverse that number? The simplest way of doing that mathematically would be:

    3*10^(2-2) + 2*10^(2-1) + 1*10^(2-0)

    Although I can't think of a formula or operation which would do that.

  14. #14
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    >but it has to do with numerically reversing the digits of a number

    So it is more an algorithm than a formula? You can patent algorithms, in fact a lot of algorithms are patented. Like algorithms for encryption methods etc.

    However also lot of famous algorithms are not patented. Hoare's quicksort was never patented, but it is very famous and used a lot.

    Here is some more info on patents.
    http://www.ccp14.ac.uk/maths/softwar...ent_links.html

  15. #15
    Programming Sex-God Polymorphic OOP's Avatar
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    Code:
    double Reverse(double n)
    {
        double a;
        int d,r,b;
        for(d=0,a=n;a!=int(a);a*=10.,++d);
        b = int(a);
        for(r=0;b;b/=10)
            (r*=10)+=b%10;
        a=r/pow(10,d);
        return a;
    }
    That's one way to do it in code. Without mathematical recursion I don't see it as being possible and common to the entire number system. If you have come up with a nonrecursive solution, post it. I'd be interested in seeing it.

    If you really are concerned just do the "poor man's copyright." I've done it numerous times with several things (including a mathematical process) -- write it down on paper, mail it to yourself (so it gets postmarked), and then keep it, but don't open it. Then, if anyone ever tries to steal credit for it, you have proof that you created it before them. In the US, whenever you create something, you have an unwritten copyright for it, and so as long as you can prove you made it, no one else can claim that copyright.
    Last edited by Polymorphic OOP; 02-22-2003 at 09:16 AM.

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