Space Shuttle

This is a discussion on Space Shuttle within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; Originally posted by Travis Dane You can't really blame that person, It's so incredible complicated to get a shuttle into ...

  1. #91
    Back after 2 years Panopticon's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Travis Dane
    You can't really blame that person, It's so incredible complicated
    to get a shuttle into space, A fault always shows up somewhere,
    Just like in Operating Systems
    I imagine that somewhere in NASA immediately after the news broke about Columbia's demise, one of the scientists yells "Shat! I knew I forgot to carry the one!" lol
    I AM WINNER!!!1!111oneoneomne

  2. #92
    cereal killer dP munky's Avatar
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    "geeze, i must of missed a decimal point, #$cking monday detail"

  3. #93
    Mayor of Awesometown Govtcheez's Avatar
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    Usually I wouldn't do this, but it's "mundane", not monday

  4. #94
    cereal killer dP munky's Avatar
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    office space, "somebody's got a case of the mondays"
    guns dont kill people, abortion clinics kill people.

  5. #95
    train spotter
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    [bad taste jk]

    Is it too early to say?

    NASA == Need Another Seven Astronauts

    [//bad taste jk]
    "Man alone suffers so excruciatingly in the world that he was compelled to invent laughter."
    Friedrich Nietzsche

    "I spent a lot of my money on booze, birds and fast cars......the rest I squandered."
    George Best

    "If you are going through hell....keep going."
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  6. #96
    Guest Sebastiani's Avatar
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    And have you seen this program, Darkstar? What is your source? Have they publicli announced this fact, or is this word of mouth, and if so - from whom? I'm not knocking your story - but it seems doubtful that anyone would be privy to that sort of information. If the plane were pitching wrong, why wouldn't nasa correct it or the pilots? If all these pieces were falling off, why the hell wouldn't you hear the pilot and crew just panicking during reentry? - they seemed so relaxed and normal. How do you explain that?

    It would be something to see that program anyway. I wonder how lean it is - or just some bloated dinosaur? If I were to code it I would definitely go stl and object-oriented all the way with that one. But I think it would take probably 20-50 good engineers six weeks to crank out a complete system.

    Any takers?
    Code:
    bool fun(bool value)
    {
        return std::pow(std::exp(1), std::complex<float>(0, 1) 
        * std::complex<float>(std::atan(1)*(1 << (value + 2))))
        .real() > 0;
    }

  7. #97
    cereal killer dP munky's Avatar
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    6 weeks, im thinking w/a system that complicated, at least 6 months, AT LEAST, back on topic, darkstar said it was his theory at the end of one of his posts, it is an interesting theory though, but youre right, BACK IT UP (not to discount it)
    guns dont kill people, abortion clinics kill people.

  8. #98
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    >>Columbia was placed into a re-entry angle 12 degrees to the left side by a faulty re-entry navigation algorithim... they never saw this.

    Why pick an angle of 12 degrees?
    "Man alone suffers so excruciatingly in the world that he was compelled to invent laughter."
    Friedrich Nietzsche

    "I spent a lot of my money on booze, birds and fast cars......the rest I squandered."
    George Best

    "If you are going through hell....keep going."
    Winston Churchill

  9. #99
    It's full of stars adrianxw's Avatar
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    This report, (read the 7:58 entry), says the instrumentation in the gear well was lost in a staggered fashion. If the loss had been caused by the main gear tyre failure as proposed, the telemetry analogs would have been lost together.

    Of course, after the telemetry was lost, we don't know what was going on in the well, but reading the rest of the article, it still would seem that the whole thing was already going pear shaped and the gear well anomoly is an artifact rather than a causitive event. It suggests the wing structure was already breached.

    http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewnews.html?id=733

    In other sources, the investigators have again said they don't think the foam impact on launch is significant, but have, again, said, they are not ruling this out and another work group has been given the task of analysing this branch.
    Wave upon wave of demented avengers march cheerfully out of obscurity unto the dream.

  10. #100
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    I read the very interesting link you have given Adrian, and in light of this my theory has been disproved. A jagged edge near the juncture of the leading edge of the left wing and fuselage, very interesting, some form of structural defect in the left wing may have gone undetected before launch. That speaks volumes about the rest of the fleet.

    You know, Columbia was the heaviest of all the shuttle orbiters that were built, and in recent years some of this weight was removed to increase the performance of this particular orbiter, I just wonder if that played a roll in a possible structural defect.

    I just cannot believe that foam insulation caused any significant damage, something else much deeper and more serious is involved here.
    Last edited by DarkStar; 02-07-2003 at 09:29 AM.

  11. #101
    It's full of stars adrianxw's Avatar
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    >>>
    A large portion of the Columbia's leading edge has been found. It is not certain yet which wing it came from but it is large enough, according to Kostelnck, to do some analysis.
    <<<

    Mike Kostelnik is "NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for the Space Shuttle & International Space Station", (where do they get these titles from).
    Wave upon wave of demented avengers march cheerfully out of obscurity unto the dream.

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