What is out there?

This is a discussion on What is out there? within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; our sun is a third generation star, that means that another civilization had approximately 15 billion years minimum to develop ...

  1. #31
    Registered User Aran's Avatar
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    our sun is a third generation star, that means that another civilization had approximately 15 billion years minimum to develop to our point. We have been on the earth for, what, not even a million years?

    There is a great probability that there are more advanced peoples wandering about space. Who knows what they look like or act like. For all we know, there are little men inside of protons and neutrons and electrons that are actually aliens from a distant galaxy who can travel on photons.

  2. #32
    & the hat of GPL slaying Thantos's Avatar
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    Anyone remember the movie "Contact"? I think they said it best (sorry can't remember exact quote)
    If we are alone its a big waste of space.

    Oh put a tick next to the catholic who thinks there could be life out there.

  3. #33
    Registered User Aran's Avatar
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    If you don't think that there is life out there, then you must be a boneless mass of psychological waste. Seriously, it is a mathematical impossiblity that there isn't any other life out there in the entire universe.

  4. #34
    the Corvetter
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    > Seriously, it is a mathematical impossiblity that there isn't any other life out there in the entire universe.

    How?? There is no "mathematical" way of testing this. It is just a theory many believe.

  5. #35
    Registered User EvenFlow's Avatar
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    >>our sun is a third generation star, that means that another civilization had approximately 15 billion years minimum to develop to our point. We have been on the earth for, what, not even a million years?
    There is a great probability that there are more advanced peoples wandering about space. Who knows what they look like or act like. For all we know, there are little men inside of protons and neutrons and electrons that are actually aliens from a distant galaxy who can travel on photons.<<

    Well said AE.
    Ramble on...

  6. #36
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    Hmm...I'd have to agree with Garfield. This is just my belief though. I'm a Christian, and as one, I believe that Jesus Christ would have had to die in front of every civilization in the universe, or they would have to have come and observe Jesus die on Earth. This is just what I believe though.
    Think out of the box! Open Source rules!

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  7. #37
    Registered User Natase's Avatar
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    Sorry if this has already been said...

    The best single piece of evidence proving the existence of other life-forms in this universe is that none of them have ever tried to visit us...

    Imagine you're a spectator with the ability to visit earth... would you? Personally I think I'd be worried about the safety of my planet... technology aside, we're a pretty subversive species.

  8. #38
    Ethereal Raccoon Procyon's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Natase The best single piece of evidence proving the existence of other life-forms in this universe is that none of them have ever tried to visit us...
    This is a pretty bizarre statement. It is either meaningless (as either the appearance or failure to appear of extraterrestials is evidence for their existence and is nondisprovable), or it suggests that if extraterrestialls did visit us it would disprove the existence of extraterrestrials.

    No, if the universe were teeming with intelligent life, we'd see it.

  9. #39
    It's full of stars adrianxw's Avatar
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    >>> This is a pretty bizarre statement.

    Yes! I read that 2-3 times and gave up!

    >>> No, if the universe were teeming with intelligent life, we'd see it.

    I'm not sure that is true. We might well see it if we were looking in the right places with the right instruments at the right time. At present we look at a few radio frequencies at a few places - I hardly think that is a comprehensive search.
    Wave upon wave of demented avengers march cheerfully out of obscurity unto the dream.

  10. #40
    Prisoner of my own mind
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    Any other civilisations out there won't have had a 15 billion year head start on us. They'd also need to wait for a whole generation of stars to form and supernovae in order to provide enough variety of heavy atoms to allow complex life, I doubt that you can get very far along the life\evolutuionary paths with just Hydrogen, Helium and Lithium.

    They also have to survive any mass extinction events which may arise over the course of their development.

    Most other civilsations will be stuck like us.

    Destroying us from space wouldn't be prohibitely costly, it would take one big rock, carefully steered to hit our planet, if they were good enough the moon could be used, although that does require them to get rather close, best to pick one of the huge slow ones in the asteroid belt, attach some engines, write your c code to provide the control mechanism to make it hit us, no more people.

    I thought the Sun was a Population I member and hence a 2nd generation star, not 3rd...
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself.

  11. #41
    Normal vector Carlos's Avatar
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    Well, there is a proof for extraterestrial lifeforms : here I am!

    Btw, if alliens ever visited us, we probably haven't noticed them (except they want us to...).

    And why would they attack us? Just for fun (predator theme)?
    We infested / poisoned our planet so much, it wouldn't be of interest for any species (except the Zerg, ev. the Borg ).

    So, keep poluting!
    As long Earth is so trashy, nobody will try to take it from us .

    We're *really* safe from any extraterestrial threat, check it
    here

  12. #42
    Ethereal Raccoon Procyon's Avatar
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    Originally posted by RobS
    Any other civilisations out there won't have had a 15 billion year head start on us. They'd also need to wait for a whole generation of stars to form and supernovae in order to provide enough variety of heavy atoms to allow complex life, I doubt that you can get very far along the life\evolutuionary paths with just Hydrogen, Helium and Lithium.
    There would still be enough of these elements to form planetary systems after only a few billion years. In principle, the first intelligent life could probably have developed within 5-10 billion years of the Big Bang. In any event, a billion plus year headstart is a billion plus year headstart: the advances that existing for almost the order of a million times longer than our civlization must provide would be mind-boggling.
    Destroying us from space wouldn't be prohibitely costly, it would take one big rock, carefully steered to hit our planet, if they were good enough the moon could be used, although that does require them to get rather close, best to pick one of the huge slow ones in the asteroid belt, attach some engines, write your c code to provide the control mechanism to make it hit us, no more people.
    A miniature black hole would accomplish the job in much more spectacular fashion.
    I thought the Sun was a Population I member and hence a 2nd generation star, not 3rd...
    The Sun is Population I, but it's third-generation at least. The first generation was produced within a billion years of the Big Bang, and the stars that produce heavy elements only live for a few billion years at most. The oldest stars in the galactic disk you could probably call second-generation and those in globular clusters first-generation, but all of today's brightest stars would be third-plus-generation.

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