to Germany and other non-USA nations

This is a discussion on to Germany and other non-USA nations within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; I have 20 channels and I guess I could find you a documentary on WWII any day after 20:00. Hitler's ...

  1. #31
    Just because ygfperson's Avatar
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    I have 20 channels and I guess I could find you a documentary on WWII any day after 20:00. Hitler's Generals, Hitler's Women, Hitler's Henchmen, Stalingrad, Submarine Warfare, Africa, Rommel and so on. Same for the war in the Pacific.
    Same here... except it's only a few channels. It's a deciding moment in history.

    In Germany, in contrast to America, every man or woman old enough has participated in the war in one way or the other.
    I guess America is lucky to have learned the lesson about devastating war in Vietnam without actually fighting on our ground.

    Every German exchange student or German I have listened to has condemned Hitler. (When the subject was brought up, not out of the blue.) I'm sure there are still nazi sympathizers, but they're few and far between.

    Showing symbols of Hitlers idealogy is forbidden. Actually, there is a law that allows the police to confiscate anything they think might serve someone as a Nazi symbol.
    I don't really agree with these laws. There's no need to supress free speech to root out nazism, not anymore.

    That's because the Japanese were very bad at telling time. They had arranged for their ambassador to Washington to deliver their declaration of war at the precise time the attack was beginning, but somehow the letter wasn't delivered until after the attack had started. Not sure how late they were but I'm sure it's searchable on Google.
    I thought it was on purpose... a delay tactic.

  2. #32
    Seven years? civix's Avatar
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    Originally posted by -KEN-
    You know you could've just named this thread "Flamey McFlameMe" and gotten the same end result as you'll wind up with, I bet.
    The question is legit, ken. Yeah, i've often heard that there is alot of wars that the japanese dont teach about.

  3. #33
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    >I'm sure there are still nazi sympathizers, but they're few and
    >far between.

    The number of nazi sympathizers, in Europe we call them the neo-nazi's, is relative small. But there still are a lot of them, just look at the size of neo-nazi demonstrations and commemorations of nazi events. Look at the populairity of Le Pen in France. The neo-nazi organisations are not a big problem, but they sure are something we can not just ignore.

    >Yeah, i've often heard that there is alot of wars that the
    >japanese dont teach about.

    The same can be seen in movies. Most WWII movies are about Americans, Canedians, Brittains and other western soldiers invading in western Europe. Less are about the Russians.

    Also during the cold war children were taught very little about what happened on the other side of the iron curtain. Children here were taught mostly western European history and geography. Also in these days people here know very little about Russia and the other countries of the former USSR.
    Last edited by Shiro; 01-24-2003 at 11:24 AM.

  4. #34
    the hat of redundancy hat nvoigt's Avatar
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    The Bridge (Die Bruecke)

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...s=dvd&n=507846

    One of the best WWII movies I've ever seen. Don't expect heroes.

    If you can rent or buy it somewhere, go for it. But leave it for a rainy sunday afternoon, this is no saturday night popcorn stuff.
    hth
    -nv

    She was so Blonde, she spent 20 minutes looking at the orange juice can because it said "Concentrate."

    When in doubt, read the FAQ.
    Then ask a smart question.

  5. #35
    Mayor of Awesometown Govtcheez's Avatar
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    Yeesh, a $45 DVD - I'd rent it if I saw it, but I'm not gonna buy 1 movie for the price of 3 or 4...

  6. #36
    the hat of redundancy hat nvoigt's Avatar
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    Yeah, the price is probably that high because it's not an american movie and had to be translated and stuff. I'm pretty sure I could get it for a normal price here. Anyway, rent it or get it someway else, it's well worth a DVD-R.

    ( Obviously this is not a call for piracy. I'm sure you someway get it burned legally onto that DVD-R )
    hth
    -nv

    She was so Blonde, she spent 20 minutes looking at the orange juice can because it said "Concentrate."

    When in doubt, read the FAQ.
    Then ask a smart question.

  7. #37
    Unregd
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    My experience, as an American, with history has been that the school year is over before the 20th century is even reached or that it is covered quickly. My high school college-credit American history class focused mostly on the 19th century with pretty much everything after World War I, arguably the most relevant history, covered in less than a month. For my world history credits, I took two semester classes: ancient civilizations (Egypt, Greece, and Rome) and Emerging Europe (feudalism, the Church, the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, the early development of the modern European nation-states from feudalism, etc.). I never took the Modern World class, which focuses mostly on the French Revolution onward.

    On a related note, it was quite a shock to me to discover, while searching for geneological information on the Internet, that my surname is shared with a Nazi general or some other high-ranking officer. The only solace I can find is that my ancestors with this surname came to the United States in the early 19th century and so this general would have to be very distantly related if related at all. This could have been the reason why the German exchange student last year seemed slightly shocked by my last name.

    About the Aryans: The Aryans were the Persian- and Sanskrit-speaking settlers of Iran, Pakistan, and India. The name Iran itself is related to the word Aryan because that is what Aryan really means. Nazi doctrine seems to have extended the meaning to be some mythical race that spoke the ancestor of German, Greek, Persian, and all the other Indo-European languages (the hypothetical, partially reconstructed language proto-Indo-European) and who were the true original Germans in his eyes. The Arian "heresy" was based on an Iranian bishop called Arius because of his Iranian origins. It is true, though, that after the established Orthodox Christian church labeled it a heresy, Arian missionaries went outside the Roman world and converted many of the Germanic tribes, including the Saxons and Lombards, to Arianism. It was only after some of the Franks had accepted the Roman version of Christianity and begun conquering the Arian and pagan Germanic tribes to their east that Germany truly came into Medieval European culture/civilization.

  8. #38
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    The one thing I think that is most important about history is
    to read original sources. Just about any history
    class in the US about the Protestant Reformation will never
    share with you the anti-semetic paper that Martin Luther wrote. Of course they will be all to quick to share with you how the church spent their money furnishing their churches ...

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