View Poll Results: How old are you?

Voters
59. You may not vote on this poll
  • Below 13

    3 5.08%
  • 13 - 17

    30 50.85%
  • 18 - 23

    17 28.81%
  • 24 - 30

    5 8.47%
  • 30 - 50

    3 5.08%
  • Above 50

    1 1.69%

How old are you, and when did you learn programming.

This is a discussion on How old are you, and when did you learn programming. within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; Originally posted by face_master Exactly. "ooohh I learnt BASIC when I was 12, it felt so cool making expert code ...

  1. #46
    Programming Sex-God Polymorphic OOP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    1,078
    Originally posted by face_master
    Exactly. "ooohh I learnt BASIC when I was 12, it felt so cool making expert code like this:"
    Code:
    PRINT "Heres the numbers 1 to 10!"
    
    counter = 0
    WHILE counter < 10
    PRINT counter
    WEND
    That's 0 through 9

  2. #47
    PC Fixer-Upper Waldo2k2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    2,001
    ROTFLMAO

    oh man...open mouth, insert foot
    PHP and XML
    Let's talk about SAX

  3. #48
    Refugee face_master's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    2,052
    Originally posted by Polymorphic OOP
    That's 0 through 9
    Which would be expainable by the fact that I picked up BASIC at school this year while getting in trouble for having C++ compilers...

  4. #49
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    9
    I am 23 and I learned programming when I was 21 (C++ and Java).

  5. #50
    Has a Masters in B.S.
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    2,267
    older and before j00. hehe.

    >45. Began programming in 1977.

    and people still argue with you don't they!!

    edit: can't imagine having to program those old computers(if you could really call them that)... yehk.
    Last edited by no-one; 12-12-2002 at 02:16 AM.
    ADVISORY: This users posts are rated CP-MA, for Mature Audiences only.

  6. #51
    Shadow12345
    Guest
    If I can't force the kids into programming then I'll make the wife do it.

  7. #52
    Visionary Philosopher Sayeh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    212
    I learned electronics, radios and radars in the Navy. Just software in hardware form, really. Worked through the transition from tube to TTL. Later, I went on to missile silos in Chico in the mid 50's. Got my EE and hired into RCA after that and later Intel (I learned processors and assembly at this time), Worked at DEC for a period (still assembler (macrel)) then ended up moving and changing jobs to electric utilities in their infrared and substation sections. Advanced into Nuclear Energy, developing robotics applications for fuel handling and reactor core operations.

    On the side, when micros first became available, I picked up BASIC and learned more assembly for various processors and microcontrollers. Did lots of breadboarding and robotics design/development. I got into Pascal during my stint in the O/S group at Apple, but never liked Pascal (I hated the "begin" and "end" statements all over the place). I moved on to C/C++ and have never left, althought I still keep my hand in assembler.

    I've learned many web-based languages, but they are not "real" in the sense of a development language. Mostly they are lightweight scripting tools (Java, HTML, etc.).

    I got my hand into UNIX and enjoy PERL and CGI. I then worked in Telecom, primarily using the UNIX environment, C, and TL1.

    Now I'm retired, consulting, old and gray.
    It is not the spoon that bends, it is you who bends around the spoon.

  8. #53
    Unleashed
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    1,765
    Since 1991. I'm 21.
    C/C++ are the best, but others have their uses.
    I have a decent grip on this stuff.
    The world is waiting. I must leave you now.

  9. #54
    Funniest man in this seat minesweeper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    801
    I learned electronics, radios and radars in the Navy. Just software in hardware form, really. Worked through the transition from tube to TTL. Later, I went on to missile silos in Chico in the mid 50's. Got my EE and hired into RCA after that and later Intel (I learned processors and assembly at this time), Worked at DEC for a period (still assembler (macrel)) then ended up moving and changing jobs to electric utilities in their infrared and substation sections. Advanced into Nuclear Energy, developing robotics applications for fuel handling and reactor core operations.

    On the side, when micros first became available, I picked up BASIC and learned more assembly for various processors and microcontrollers. Did lots of breadboarding and robotics design/development. I got into Pascal during my stint in the O/S group at Apple, but never liked Pascal (I hated the "begin" and "end" statements all over the place). I moved on to C/C++ and have never left, althought I still keep my hand in assembler.

    I've learned many web-based languages, but they are not "real" in the sense of a development language. Mostly they are lightweight scripting tools (Java, HTML, etc.).

    I got my hand into UNIX and enjoy PERL and CGI. I then worked in Telecom, primarily using the UNIX environment, C, and TL1.

    Now I'm retired, consulting, old and gray.
    Now THAT is what I call a CV!! Respect to you my friend!!

    I am 22 and am doing my masters in systems engineering. I first found out what a programming language was when I started uni at 19. I have only had 2 modules of C++ and one of asm in my degree taking me up to the point of linked lists and I have learnt some WinAPI in my spare time. Unfortunately I don't get to code nearly as often as I would like. Programming is only about 5% of my degree which includes many things from 3-phase electrical systems to gas turbines.

  10. #55
    Registered User Scourfish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    397
    When I was 2 and a half years old, I completely recoded Union Pacific's payroll system and removed all the glitches. When I was 5, I had managed to break all pentagon encryptions; but I'm still not gonna tell you who the second gunman on the grassy knoll was, because you are all too dumb to figure it out yourself. When I was 5 and a half, i had successfully written a program called Linux, but that hoebag Linux Torvolds stole my sourcecode and stuffed me into a trashcan, so he got all the credit for it.

  11. #56
    Registered User jawwadalam's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    131
    I have started Programming With Basic just due to my own interest almost 2 years before and started learning C programming seriously almost A year ago.. and On 8th january I will be of 20...
    One day you will ask what more important to you..
    I will say my life..
    and You will leave me with even knowing
    that
    You are my Life (L)

  12. #57
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    4,913
    I was 7 when I first started with BASIC, now I'm 15 and three-quarters (hey - aren't I entitled to still have some little kid left in me?)

  13. #58
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    8
    I'm 15 and I just started programming the problem is my school only owns one computer which the students are not even aloud to touch, I built my own computer about a half a year ago and that makes me the computer geek of the school.

  14. #59
    napKINfolk.com napkin111's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    310
    I'm 17 (18 in 4 months yay!) an I started programming about 2 years ago on the Cybico (anyone remember those things?). They had a program called CyBasic and I tought myself in my study hall, English, and math classes (my teachers thought it was a calculator :P ). Then I moved on to C++ about a year ago, then Java about 4 months ago.


    //napKIN
    www.tarasque.net
    "The best way to get answers is to just keep working the problem, recognizing when you are stalled, and directing the search pattern.....Donít just wait for The Right Thing to strike you Ė try everything you think might even be in the right direction, so you can collect clues about the nature of the problem."
    -John Carmack

  15. #60
    Senior Member joshdick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Phildelphia, PA
    Posts
    1,146
    I'm 16 and a high school senior. Last year during my pre-calculus class, I would get bored constantly. That was the first math class that used graphing calculators. I began learning how to program a TI-82 by looking at a few programs in the back of my math book and the manual for the calculator.
    My first program was called the Doubler. It prompted for a number, doubled it, and then printed the number. Gee, was I proud of that the first time I ran it. From there, I continued programming on a TI-83 and TI-83+. I've written some rather useful programs for use in my pre-calc and AP calc classes. I even wrote a game or two.
    I (naturally) had a lot of fun programming. Come time to sign up for classes for my senior year, I noticed that there was a computer progamming class that didn't require prerequisites. I decided to take it since it was an honors level course and I had the room on my schedule although I didn't even know what C++ was at that time.
    Now, I'm having a blast learning C++. I'm considering majoring in Computer Science.
    FAQ

    "The computer programmer is a creator of universes for which he alone is responsible. Universes of virtually unlimited complexity can be created in the form of computer programs." -- Joseph Weizenbaum.

    "If you cannot grok the overall structure of a program while taking a shower, you are not ready to code it." -- Richard Pattis.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21