binary

This is a discussion on binary within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; if real programmers program in binary, how come what he's programming, translates to (4 ?...

  1. #31
    cereal killer dP munky's Avatar
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    if real programmers program in binary, how come what he's programming, translates to (4 ?
    guns dont kill people, abortion clinics kill people.

  2. #32
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    110101010101010111000110011001010100110010100100 ?

    0101010101011000011100 !!!!!!

  3. #33
    cereal killer dP munky's Avatar
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    01101011011100100111010101110011011010000010110000 10000001111001011011110111010100100000011000010111 00100110010100100000011000010010000001100011011011 11011011010111000001101100011001010111010001100101 00100000011001100111010101100011011010110111010001 1000010111001001100100

    hey krush what the hell does UeLUX mean??
    guns dont kill people, abortion clinics kill people.

  4. #34
    Used Registerer jdinger's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Polymorphic OOP
    Yes, it does, because there is no BINARY LANGAUGE. If there was a binary language you could program in it, but you can't. You can program in machine code, but that varies. The machine codes are different languages, NOT binary.

    You write with letters, that doesn't make our ALPHABET a language, does it? Just because you can deal with the language in binary doesn't mean a thing.
    But you're mistakenly using the arguement that the alphabet is seperate from the language that a person can write a the same information using the letters A-Z (standard english alphabet) and write the same thing in any other language using those letters when in fact many of the world's languages have their own unique alphabets.

    True I can write something in english with A-Z and then re-write MOST of it in german, but the german alphabet has letters that aren't included in the english alphabet.

  5. #35
    Programming Sex-God Polymorphic OOP's Avatar
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    The alphabet is not completely separate from a language, but that does NOT make them the same thing. The alphabet is of course related but they are in not way anywhere near both langauges. A language means that you have to have a way of understanding the code that is written universally.

    If someone writes out a series of binary bits and asked you to interperet what it meant, you can't say for certain.

    However, if someone writes out a series of binary bits and says "this is in this particular type of machine code," then you could do it. The machine code is the language, the binary is just the medium.

    You can rewrite the binary in HEX -- does that make hexadecimal a language? You can rewrite the hex in the arabic base 10 number system.

    For instance -- if binary were a language, you would be able to tell me, without a doubt, what this meant

    1101000101101010111

    The fact of the matter is, you have no idea. The fact that it's binary means nothing. It's just the medium for communication.

    Now, tell me what this means:

    874463692348572

    It's a number, just like binary. You can use binary, hexadecimal, or decimal as an "alphabet," but that doesn't change the fact that it, itself, is not a language.

    Binary is not a language because by itself it IS just a number system. Many different languages can be made using a number system, but that doesn't make it a language itself.

    If you don't understand it by now, I'll repeat it many many many more times. Calling binary a "programming language" is not valid by any means.

  6. #36
    Has a Masters in B.S.
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    i think we need Sayeh or Salem to open a can of woopass in here since none of you seem to take a gentle hint from those who've already tried.

    your arguements are pure semantics...
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  7. #37
    cereal killer dP munky's Avatar
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    who's arguments???
    guns dont kill people, abortion clinics kill people.

  8. #38
    It's full of stars adrianxw's Avatar
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    >>> your arguements are pure semantics...

    Correct.

    If you have no means of entering a program other than by entering raw binary, then you are programming in binary. True, the binary represents machine code instructions, but equally, machine code instructions could be said to represent binary. Semantics.
    Wave upon wave of demented avengers march cheerfully out of obscurity unto the dream.

  9. #39
    cereal killer dP munky's Avatar
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    but binary in and of itself is not a language
    guns dont kill people, abortion clinics kill people.

  10. #40
    Registered User mepaco's Avatar
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    Binary is not a programming language. In fact, by definition, if you are programming in binary codes you are not using a programming language. Here are the definitions:
    machine language
    n.
    A set of instructions for a specific central processing unit, designed to be usable by a computer without being translated. Also called machine code.
    programming language
    n.
    An artificial language used to write instructions that can be translated into machine language and then executed by a computer.
    Since a programming language is an aritifical language that can be TRANSLATED into machine language then programming in binary is not using a programming language. Binary is a number system, nothing more nothing less.

  11. #41
    Guest Sebastiani's Avatar
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    If I were to say to you "I am programming in assembly" one might argue that I am "using assembly" not "in assembly". Why split hairs? Context is more important than technicality, you know.
    Code:
    bool fun(bool value)
    {
        return std::pow(std::exp(1), std::complex<float>(0, 1) 
        * std::complex<float>(std::atan(1)*(1 << (value + 2))))
        .real() > 0;
    }

  12. #42
    Registered User mepaco's Avatar
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    Assembly is a language that has correspondence to binary numbers. Assembly requires translation, though it is a one-to-one translation. Binary is a number system.
    I've always wondered, is binary a programming language? I always thought it was.
    We split hairs because the question was asked.

  13. #43
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    >>Why split hairs? Context is more important than technicality, you know.

    Finally; Someone said it. You people ever feel like going outside?

    You know you've been programming too much, and actually interacting with your own species too little, when you get worked up about the possible definitions of binary in its various possible uses.

    No, really: Go. Out. Side. ... Now.

    j/k Peace

    >>We split hairs because the question was asked.

    Its a good a reason as any.
    "There's always another way"
    -lightatdawn (lightatdawn.cprogramming.com)

  14. #44
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    >No, really: Go. Out. Side. ... Now.

    no no no!! its freezing out there...
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  15. #45
    Registered User webturtle0's Avatar
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    Originally posted by lightatdawn
    >>We split hairs because the question was asked.

    Its a good a reason as any.
    And I still didn't get a straight answer....
    "Yo"

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