binary

This is a discussion on binary within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; Originally posted by adrianxw How do you thing people entered code into machines before they had cute languages/assemblers to make ...

  1. #16
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    Originally posted by adrianxw
    How do you thing people entered code into machines before they had cute languages/assemblers to make it easier?

    I can well remember long sessions in front of a desk with a big row of up/down switches, where you set the switches and then pressed the "Clk" button to read that BINARY in, and repeat for HOURS. Then when you figured you'd got it all in right, you pressed "Exec" or something and watched while nothing happened.

    Of course you can program in binary, (or hex if you have the relative luxury of a hex keypad).
    You ancient programmers and your crazy stories. Have any others?

  2. #17
    Confused Magos's Avatar
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    Originally posted by adrianxw
    How do you thing people entered code into machines before they had cute languages/assemblers to make it easier?

    I can well remember long sessions in front of a desk with a big row of up/down switches, where you set the switches and then pressed the "Clk" button to read that BINARY in, and repeat for HOURS. Then when you figured you'd got it all in right, you pressed "Exec" or something and watched while nothing happened.
    You don't try lots of random combinations when programming low level circuits, there is a lot of fine math behind that.
    That would be the same as randomizing lots of letters hoping it would end up in a C/C++ program...
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  3. #18
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    I can well remember long sessions in front of a desk with a big row of up/down switches, where you set the switches and then pressed the "Clk" button to read that BINARY in, and repeat for HOURS. Then when you figured you'd got it all in right, you pressed "Exec" or something and watched while nothing happened.
    I follow a simular process with my VC compiler.

    Long sessions in front of a desk... Check.
    Repeat for hours... Check.
    Press 'Exec' when you figure you got it right... Check.

    But then the 'nothing happening' part is replaced by a horrible display of cascading errors and eventual system lock and crash resulting in multiple reboots and backup restorations. Just goes to show how much better we've got it now, hey? None of this 'nothing happened' junk. Pfft. Whos got time for that?
    "There's always another way"
    -lightatdawn (lightatdawn.cprogramming.com)

  4. #19
    It's full of stars adrianxw's Avatar
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    >>> I follow a simular process with my VC compiler.

    Yeah, that's about right!

    >>> Have any others?

    How about this. Another system I used many years ago, (a Ferranti Argus computer), was programmed, (again in binary), by pulling out trays each of which was a large matrix of small round holes. To program the thing, you put a small ferrite bead in a hole to make a 0, or left it empty to make a 1. A small design flaw with the system meant you could pull the tray out all the way thus the back fell to the floor and all the little beads fell out and rolled away.

    >>> >>> Have any others?

    Dozens probably - give me my 2.5 GHz P4, and my VC++ any day. The old systems were fun at times, but for the most were tedious, irritating and unreliable.

    BTW...

    >>> ancient programmers

    I am not ancient yet, I may be older than some in here, true.
    Wave upon wave of demented avengers march cheerfully out of obscurity unto the dream.

  5. #20
    Registered User adamviper's Avatar
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    Well you will never learn binary and i feel that it is a programing language.

  6. #21
    Programming Sex-God Polymorphic OOP's Avatar
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    Well than you missed the whole first part of the topic. It's not a matter of opinion -- Binary is not a language, it's just a nubmer system on which languages can be formed.

  7. #22
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    Originally posted by Polymorphic OOP
    Well than you missed the whole first part of the topic. It's not a matter of opinion -- Binary is not a language, it's just a nubmer system on which languages can be formed.
    Binary is one of our first programming languages, aside from machine and assembly. More modern languages evolved from those three, and eventually became more text based programming. Just because binary is numbers, doesn't mean that it isn't a language. We write c/c++ with words. By your reasoning, using "cout<<" cannot be deemed a language. see where I'm going with this?
    This has been a public service announcement from GOD.

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  8. #23
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    Yes, actually it does mean it's not a language, as I already explained if you would have happened to read my earlier posts in this topic.

    If you think that binary is a language, than you DON'T have an understanding of what it really is.

    Binary is a medium where other languages are formed. If you can't undestand that after my explanations at the beginning of the topic, then, well, get help.

    There is no binary language. There's machine codes, assembly languages, etc. If you think binary is a language then you probably falsly think of machine code as "binary language."

  9. #24
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    Originally posted by Polymorphic OOP
    Yes, actually it does mean it's not a language, as I already explained if you would have happened to read my earlier posts in this topic.

    If you think that binary is a language, than you DON'T have an understanding of what it really is.

    Binary is a medium where other languages are formed. If you can't undestand that after my explanations at the beginning of the topic, then, well, get help.

    There is no binary language. There's machine codes, assembly languages, etc. If you think binary is a language then you probably falsly think of machine code as "binary language."
    How very true.
    "Yo"

  10. #25
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    toaster you are kinda right but your crazy

  11. #26
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    Hmm....
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  12. #27
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    ha

  13. #28
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    http://www.hyperdictionary.com/dictionary/binary
    binary
    5 entries found.

    From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]

    Binary \Bi"na*ry\, a. [L. binarius, fr. bini two by two, two at
    a time, fr. root of bis twice; akin to E. two: cf. F.
    binaire.]
    Compounded or consisting of two things or parts;
    characterized by two (things).

    {Binary arithmetic}, that in which numbers are expressed
    according to the binary scale, or in which two figures
    only, 0 and 1, are used, in lieu of ten; the cipher
    multiplying everything by two, as in common arithmetic by
    ten. Thus, 1 is one; 10 is two; 11 is three; 100 is four,
    etc. --Davies & Peck.

    {Binary compound} (Chem.), a compound of two elements, or of
    an element and a compound performing the function of an
    element, or of two compounds performing the function of
    elements.

    {Binary logarithms}, a system of logarithms devised by Euler
    for facilitating musical calculations, in which 1 is the
    logarithm of 2, instead of 10, as in the common
    logarithms, and the modulus 1.442695 instead of .43429448.


    {Binary measure} (Mus.), measure divisible by two or four;
    common time.

    {Binary nomenclature} (Nat. Hist.), nomenclature in which the
    names designate both genus and species.

    {Binary scale} (Arith.), a uniform scale of notation whose
    ratio is two.

    {Binary star} (Astron.), a double star whose members have a
    revolution round their common center of gravity.

    {Binary theory} (Chem.), the theory that all chemical
    compounds consist of two constituents of opposite and
    unlike qualities.

    From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]

    Binary \Bi"na*ry\, n.
    That which is constituted of two figures, things, or parts;
    two; duality. --Fotherby.

    From WordNet (r) 1.6 [wn]

    binary
    adj 1: of or pertaining to a number system have 2 as its base; "a
    binary digit"
    2: consisting of two (units or components or elements or terms)
    or based on two; "a binary star is a system in which two
    stars revolve around each other"; "a binary compound";
    "the binary number system has two as its base"
    n : a system of two stars that revolve around each other under
    their mutual gravitation [syn: {binary star}, {double
    star}]

    From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (13 Mar 01) [foldoc]

    binary

    1. <mathematics> {Base} two. A number representation
    consisting of zeros and ones used by practically all computers
    because of its ease of implementation using digital
    electronics and {Boolean algebra}.

    2. <file format> Any file format for {digital} {data} encoded
    as a sequence of {bit}s but not consisting of a sequence of
    printable {characters} ({text}). The term is often used for
    executable {machine code}.

    Of course all digital data, including characters, is actually
    binary data (unless it uses some (rare) system with more than
    two discrete levels) but the distinction between binary and
    text is well established.

    3. <programming> A description of an {operator} which takes
    two {arguments}. See also {unary}, {ternary}.

    (1998-07-29)



    From Internet Dictionary Project [idp_italian]

    binary
    binario

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  14. #29
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    Poly, what is meant by programming in binary "as a language" is simply to write the opcodes and such out in their rawest form. I had an uncle that programmed oil-refinery equipment this way back in the 50's. This was literally writing a program like:
    3F 99 5B A2, etc.
    The fact that the term binary refers to the number system, as well as the data streams associated with computing doesn't invalidate this use of the word.
    Code:
    #include <cmath>
    #include <complex>
    bool euler_flip(bool value)
    {
        return std::pow
        (
            std::complex<float>(std::exp(1.0)), 
            std::complex<float>(0, 1) 
            * std::complex<float>(std::atan(1.0)
            *(1 << (value + 2)))
        ).real() < 0;
    }

  15. #30
    Programming Sex-God Polymorphic OOP's Avatar
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    Yes, it does, because there is no BINARY LANGAUGE. If there was a binary language you could program in it, but you can't. You can program in machine code, but that varies. The machine codes are different languages, NOT binary.

    You write with letters, that doesn't make our ALPHABET a language, does it? Just because you can deal with the language in binary doesn't mean a thing.

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