need to improve my programming

This is a discussion on need to improve my programming within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; I find that when ever I try to right a program I go at about 10 lines an hour average, ...

  1. #1
    bobish
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    need to improve my programming

    I find that when ever I try to right a program I go at about 10 lines an hour average, I never get very far and my code always ends up doing stuff in a bad way and I often relize that to get it to work ill have to redo it. What books can someone recomend for improving this. I would like the book to be easy to follow, entertaining, and not using too much c++/oop. It can be on ether game programming or general programming.

  2. #2
    tgm
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    Registered User tgm's Avatar
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    'Code Complete' is an excellent book to read.

  3. #3
    Just because ygfperson's Avatar
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    the best medicine is experience. don't be afraid of doing your programs over again.

    i suggest c++ for dummies. while there are a few things out of date for c++, and some other things go unmentioned like variable argument functions, it provides an easy-to-follow guide to c++.

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    Seeking motivation... endo's Avatar
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    My coding improved alot by hanging around on boards like these, you will pick up lots from reading the answers to most of the questions that are posted

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    x4000 Ruski's Avatar
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    Sams Teach Yourself C++ In 21 Days
    what does signature stand for?

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    Addicted to the Internet netboy's Avatar
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    Data Structures, Algorithms & Software Principles In C
    Author: Thomas A. Standish
    It's unfulfilled dreams that keep you alive.

    //netboy

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    >...I never get very far and my code always ends up doing stuff in
    >a bad way and I often relize that to get it to work ill have to
    >redo it.

    That doesn't matter if you learnt from it. You realise that you sometimes do things in a bad way, this is very good. It means that you recognise your own problems, that is learning and gaining experience, very valuable.

    But I think you should pay some more attention to design. Before coding you should take pen and paper and pay attention to the design of your program and think about the algorithms you are going to use.

    A nice book on program design, datastructures and algorithms is Program Design and Datastructures in C.
    http://vig.prenhall.com/catalog/acad...88366X,00.html

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    5|-|1+|-|34|) ober's Avatar
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    Shiro makes a good point... to get a good feel for how things should flow, or how it should be done, try making a flow chart. Outline what you need to do, and a rough idea of how to do it.

    And don't forget to document!

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    x4000 Ruski's Avatar
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    Loooool
    what does signature stand for?

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    5|-|1+|-|34|) ober's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Ruski
    Loooool
    uhhh... wut was that about?

  11. #11
    It's full of stars adrianxw's Avatar
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    >>>
    Before coding you should take pen and paper and pay attention to the design of your program and think about the algorithms you are going to use.
    <<<

    Boring to the amateurs here, but so true! . I bet half the time you have coded something up and then found you needed to re do it would have been prevented if you had seriously thought about the design of your program.

    I have said this over and over, but I'll say it again. Design your program then code it, not the other way round. It is alll so easy to think, "yeah,I'll need a routine that does this, and one that does that", code it up - great, then try to thread all these dispparate chunks into a whole - oh dear, "the output of this is not what I need for the input to that", and so on.

    If you're happy being an amateur, great, if you have designs on being a professional, give the job, as a whole some thought.
    Wave upon wave of demented avengers march cheerfully out of obscurity unto the dream.

  12. #12
    bobish
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    well you see thats the problem, If i'm Carless and lazy then I get fruatrated and give up and if im not then I get bored and give up.

  13. #13
    PC Fixer-Upper Waldo2k2's Avatar
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    It's ok to get bored and frustrated.
    See, some people are, how should i put this without hurting feelings...take on the challenge of programming better. Some people, enjoy the frustration (yes in a sick twisted way) of not knowing how to fix what they just created....or even how to create it. Some people get ........ed off or bored and move along. The second does NOT mean you are any less of a programmer as far as talent or intelligence goes. It just means you have to tackle everything a different way. Get a book, Sams 21 days is a good choice along with the C++ Black Book. Go through the parts that keep your interest long enough to read a chapter. Look at the examples. Then, this is how you beat your problem: try to re-create what they've done in your own style, it shouldn't ever be more than 10 lines (at least not in black book). Now save each of these small executables and workspaces away in a safe place. Slowly build yourself a library (i do it all the time for functions i can never remember how to use). Next time you have to make a program, you have small pieces of bug free code you can copy and paste together, and concentrate more on what you want your program to do, not on how to code it. Hope i helped.
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  14. #14
    x4000 Ruski's Avatar
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    Originally posted by ober5861


    uhhh... wut was that about?
    Never mind
    what does signature stand for?

  15. #15
    aurė entuluva! mithrandir's Avatar
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    There is a free online version of "Teach yourself C++ in 21 days" which IMO is quite good to get started (http://firstpod.tripod.com/cpp21/) or if you're stuck on something and need a quick reference. I highly recommend anything by Bruce Eckel (www.mindview.net). His book "Thinking in C++" is excellent (and you can find it available to download at http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/docs/books/eckel/. It gives you more that just code, he really explains why things are done the way they are in C++, as well as how to effectivley manage projects. It may not be the best thing to start with if you are inexperience with programming, but if youa re it will vastly improve your understanding of OOP and C++.
    Last edited by mithrandir; 07-28-2002 at 08:19 AM.

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