New here, just sayin 'hi'

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    New here, just sayin 'hi'

    Hello, I'm argv. Just saying 'hello' to everyone.

    I will probably stop in with some stupid questions once in a while, perhaps the occasional smart question, and just discussion.

    I'm currently taking programming classes at a community college. I'm taking regular beginning "c" right now, and am trying to decide whether to take advanced "c" or go right into C++. I want to have a good grasp of the procedural language before going to the OOP stuff, even though "c" programming is all but dead. I dunno..

    I also work with autocad and use (a very small amount) of visual basic and (alot) of LISP language.

    anyways, thanks,

    argv.

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    int x = *((int *) NULL); Cactus_Hugger's Avatar
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    Welcome to the boards.

    even though "c" programming is all but dead.
    Don't under-estimate C! It used to be my language at heart, until I found std::string in C++. However, that said, there are still places where C is used. Drivers, and other areas close to the kernel of an OS, are generally C, and many embedded systems only have C compilers available.
    Many libraries out there are written completely in C as well.
    long time; /* know C? */
    Unprecedented performance: Nothing ever ran this slow before.
    Any sufficiently advanced bug is indistinguishable from a feature.
    Real Programmers confuse Halloween and Christmas, because dec 25 == oct 31.
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    Kernel hacker
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    Welcome to CBoard.

    I don't agree that C is dead. It may not be the language of the future, but C I have been working on commercial C code written in the last year or two. A lot of driver-code for all sorts of OS's is written in C. And the company I work for produces an embedded C++ OS - the reason I work in C more than C++ is that the drivers for graphics devices in the embedded systems are often written to work in several different OS's, and thus written in C rather than C++.

    Whilst the process of getting the job done is a bit different between C++ and C, there is also a lot of commonality. So learning C first and then going C++ is certainly not a waste of effort.

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    Compilers can produce warnings - make the compiler programmers happy: Use them!
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    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    The linux kernel: C
    The Perl interpreter, and AFAIK *most* scripting languages: C
    openGL: C
    and as I noticed today, directX: C [correction, directX is MS-COM, not C]
    Rumour has it the *fastest* *most efficient* language: C

    But I am kind of a charlatan who intends to learn C++...later, maybe. For what it's worth, I would say follow your interests.

    Also (somebody correct me if I am wrong), I believe most embedded programming is probably in C. Which if you think about what that means, it would be very far from "dead".

    In any case, hi argv, cboard is the best website on the internet -- congratulations.
    Last edited by MK27; 05-25-2009 at 07:31 AM.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

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    Kernel hacker
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    The C is faster than C++ is a myth. Most of the time this comes about from inexperienced programmers writing poor code (e.g. passing large class objects by value, which means the structure gets copied when the function is called). In C, the only way to copy a large amount of data when calling a function is by passing large structs by value. C++ has many more possibilities, since C++ also allows complex classes as well as the old-fashioned struct types.

    C++ is also a much richer language, so there is more room for getting it wrong.

    But given sufficient skill in the programmer, there should be no or littel difference between C and C++ - and in some cases, C++ is actually able to solve the problem in a very neat way.

    --
    Mats
    Compilers can produce warnings - make the compiler programmers happy: Use them!
    Please don't PM me for help - and no, I don't do help over instant messengers.

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    In my head happyclown's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forum, argv!
    OS: Linux Mint 13(Maya) LTS 64 bit.

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    and the hat of sweating
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    Quote Originally Posted by MK27 View Post
    Rumour has it the *fastest* *most efficient* language: C
    Try comparing the speed of qsort() to std::sort() and see which one wins.
    "I am probably the laziest programmer on the planet, a fact with which anyone who has ever seen my code will agree." - esbo, 11/15/2008

    "the internet is a scary place to be thats why i dont use it much." - billet, 03/17/2010

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    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cpjust View Post
    Try comparing the speed of qsort() to std::sort() and see which one wins.
    Why does everyone always want to take the air out of my balloon?!!? Anyway, qsort is for quacks. That's why it's called qsnort, dope.

    I would imagine the essence of speed is in the compiler, not obscure add on libraries.
    Last edited by MK27; 05-25-2009 at 08:03 AM.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

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    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MK27 View Post
    and as I noticed today, directX: C
    Also, DirectX is not C. It's COM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    Hail to the king, baby. Akkernight's Avatar
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    I heard they are working on and have made some progress on making the DirectX code into C++ code, dunno if this is true tho...
    And to the topic starter's question, I'll always suggest C++, but I'm not one of the clever ones so I dunno what's best for you
    Currently research OpenGL

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    Quote Originally Posted by matsp View Post
    Welcome to CBoard.

    I don't agree that C is dead. It may not be the language of the future, but C I have been working on commercial C code written in the last year or two. A lot of driver-code for all sorts of OS's is written in C. And the company I work for produces an embedded C++ OS - the reason I work in C more than C++ is that the drivers for graphics devices in the embedded systems are often written to work in several different OS's, and thus written in C rather than C++.

    Whilst the process of getting the job done is a bit different between C++ and C, there is also a lot of commonality. So learning C first and then going C++ is certainly not a waste of effort.

    --
    Mats
    That is true. I guess I should say that for what *i* plan to do with programming, C isn't going to be of much use. However, it would never be a waste of time to learn such a rich and open language. Besides, I forgot about hardware drivers. Cool, I'm glad C isn't dead. thats a good thing.

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    sweet

    Quote Originally Posted by MK27 View Post
    The linux kernel: C
    The Perl interpreter, and AFAIK *most* scripting languages: C
    openGL: C
    and as I noticed today, directX: C [correction, directX is MS-COM, not C]
    Rumour has it the *fastest* *most efficient* language: C

    But I am kind of a charlatan who intends to learn C++...later, maybe. For what it's worth, I would say follow your interests.

    Also (somebody correct me if I am wrong), I believe most embedded programming is probably in C. Which if you think about what that means, it would be very far from "dead".

    In any case, hi argv, cboard is the best website on the internet -- congratulations.
    Thanks.

    The only thing that is NOT good about C, is obviously the lack of OOP concept. I can use C++ libraies at my job to control autocad, but can't with C unfortunately. Thats all I'm saying I guess.

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    nice name

    Quote Originally Posted by Cactus_Hugger View Post
    Welcome to the boards.


    Don't under-estimate C! It used to be my language at heart, until I found std::string in C++. However, that said, there are still places where C is used. Drivers, and other areas close to the kernel of an OS, are generally C, and many embedded systems only have C compilers available.
    Many libraries out there are written completely in C as well.
    haha.. nice name. [cactus_hugger]. Uhm, yes. true. I'm glad to see so many dedicated C fans, thats encouraging.

  14. #14
    Banned ಠ_ಠ's Avatar
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    Welcome!

    have you read your SICP today?
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