IBL or Study overseas?

This is a discussion on IBL or Study overseas? within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; G'day, I've been thinking about doing a semester of my degree (BSE) overseas. However I've been invited for IBL (Industry ...

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    Woof, woof! zacs7's Avatar
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    IBL or Study overseas?

    G'day,

    I've been thinking about doing a semester of my degree (BSE) overseas. However I've been invited for IBL (Industry Based Learning) based on my results. The catch is, I'll probably only be able to do one of them. The IBL scholarship is worth $15,000 which you earn over 22-weeks of working (however it's worth 18 credits and takes 24 credits of "time" -- ie you'd be able to earn 24 credits with a normal load, thus you have to overload to make up the other 6). IBL however is not guaranteed as there are not always people willing to hire undergrads, as well as I must maintain a distinction average for the next year.

    So my question is, would a semester of overseas study improve my employability? Ie the ability to work in new environments or something, or is trying for IBL the best bet? I could end up wasting my entire holidays for nothing (I'd lose about $8000 from work as I have to do a unit over the summer). I'd really love to do a semester over seas but I don't know what to do . Note that the cost of studying overseas is covered by my uni, as well as a $6000 interest free loan from the government for travel/living costs. Which seems too good to pass up.

    I can't see myself staying in the quiet little southern hemisphere for the rest of my life. BTW all prices are in Australian Dollars

    Zac

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    Registered User whiteflags's Avatar
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    Since you expressed a desire to leave Australia, I would study overseas. It can be a rewarding experience. A friend of mine is studying in Japan for one semester starting at the end of the month, though, as my official disclaimer.

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    So my question is, would a semester of overseas study improve my employability?
    I suggest that you try to focus on what you want to do, not what your future employer might expect you to have done.

    At the very least, studying "overseas" will do no harm. In certain contexts, it will highly increase your chances of getting a job, as it shows flexibility, curiosity, courage, self-confidence and competency. In other contexts, it might even be a soft requirement.

    Furthermore, you might choose a country where you are able to learn another language. This will be an additional bonus entry for your CV.

    Besides, the toilet flush runs opposite on the other hemisphere, which will - among other things - certainly be a most intriguing experience.

    Greets,
    Philip
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    Source code begins with an empty file.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snafuist View Post
    Besides, the toilet flush runs opposite on the other hemisphere, which will - among other things - certainly be a most intriguing experience.
    Except that is a myth! It may well run the other way, but it depends much more on the plumbing than which side the equator you happen to be.

    See the subject of "misconceptions" in Wikipedia:
    Coriolis effect - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Edit: I agree with the other posters: Do what YOU feel is the best option, not what you think a future employer will value. What a future employer thinks is very unpredictable, and depends on the personalit(y/ies) of the employer, the job position and the overall job market.

    I choose to move to another country for a number of reasons "for a couple of years" - as to my ability of predicting the future, I give myself below average grads, as I'm still here nearly 14 years later, and no view of changing that anytime soon.

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    Last edited by matsp; 03-30-2009 at 02:49 AM.
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    Woof, woof! zacs7's Avatar
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    Wow thanks!

    I was thinking of the USA or Canada (Has the plus of learning French, while seemingly being able to fall back on English). I've already spent a month in Europe before, so I feel I've seen enough of that area . And I did study French at school for 13 years straight, although there's not much I remember.

    To be honest IBL doesn't interest me that much, it's just so many people around me have told me "I have to do it", "It's worth so much to complement my degree" etc. I guess going to the interviews in a 3-piece suit on a 43C day was (almost) for nothing .

    BTW, You guys don't find Australian accents hard to understand? I work in an internet cafe part time and all the back-packers seem to have a tough time. Even the English speakers.

    A little side question, does having a British passport (as well as an Australian one) help when it comes to moving to/living in Canada? You'd think it would as both are part of the Commonwealth, but I can't find any information on it.

    Thanks again.
    Last edited by zacs7; 03-30-2009 at 03:07 AM.

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    I think accents are something you have to get used to, and also something you have to tune - when using a lot of UK slang/colloqialisms, US or Aussies will have a hard time understanding, and the same applies to US or Australian English - if you use the "local" forms of words and different meanings to words, then it is hard to understand.

    Being AWARE that you have a different accent and thinking about how you say things when talking to those who are not from the same origin is often necessary.

    I personally haven't met an Australian that I couldn't understand. I "overheard" a fellow in Texas once that sounded EXACTLY like Boomhauer in King of the Hill - I didn't understand a word beyond "cold" and "weather" (considering that it was freezing cold [YES in Texas] and raining with heavy winds, the subject of conversation was pretty obvious).

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    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zacs7 View Post
    BTW, You guys don't find Australian accents hard to understand? I work in an internet cafe part time and all the back-packers seem to have a tough time. Even the English speakers.

    Thanks again.
    Tourists don't really represent the cream of the crop. Nor do they represent the most culturally afluent segment of any society. That said, english being what it is, it may not be your accent, but your use of colloquialisms, which do not always translate across cultures, even ones that speak the same language.
    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by abachler View Post
    Tourists don't really represent the cream of the crop. Nor do they represent the most culturally afluent segment of any society. That said, english being what it is, it may not be your accent, but your use of colloquialisms, which do not always translate across cultures, even ones that speak the same language.
    I think tourists come from all walks of life - as far as I know, highly educated intelligent people have holidays just as much as those of little education and/or intelligence. The destination may vary, of course.

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    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by matsp View Post
    I think tourists come from all walks of life - as far as I know, highly educated intelligent people have holidays just as much as those of little education and/or intelligence. The destination may vary, of course.

    So then you agree that they represent the cross section of the population and not -

    1. The cream of the crop
    or
    2. The most culturally afluent
    Last edited by abachler; 03-30-2009 at 06:51 AM.
    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by abachler View Post
    So then you agree that they represent the cross section of the population and not -

    1. The cream of the crop
    or
    2. The most culturally afluent
    I'd agree that they do represent a cross-section, yes. But I read your original statement to mean that they represent only those below the top, which I disagree with. Also, destinations for a holiday will probably vary depending on interests and level of education/intelligence.

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    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by matsp View Post
    I'd agree that they do represent a cross-section, yes. But I read your original statement to mean that they represent only those below the top, which I disagree with. Also, destinations for a holiday will probably vary depending on interests and level of education/intelligence.

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    It will serve you well to never assume that my statements mean other than precisely what they say. If I mean something perjoratively, you can be sure there will be no doubt. I don't think anyone here would claim that I censor my comments I'm not claiming that I ALWAYS say exactly what I mean, but that is usually the case. Besides, if you take issue with precisely what someone said, rather than what you read into their statements, it put's them in the position to either clarify, or reaffirm their statements. If you take issue with what you read into their statements, it either puts them on the defensive, or gives them the legitimate opportunity to lecture you on proper debate etiquette.
    Last edited by abachler; 03-30-2009 at 07:14 AM.
    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by abachler View Post
    It will serve you well to never assume that my statements mean other than precisely what they say. If I mean something perjoratively, you can be sure there will be no doubt. I don't think anyone here would claim that I censor my comments I'm not claiming that I ALWAYS say exactly what I mean, but that is usually the case. Besides, if you take issue with precisely what someone said, rather than what you read into their statements, it put's them in the position to either clarify, or reaffirm their statements. If you take issue with what you read into their statements, it either puts them on the defensive, or gives them the legitimate opportunity to lecture you on proper debate etiquette.
    And how will I know whether:
    Tourists don't really represent the cream of the crop. Nor do they represent the most culturally afluent segment of any society.
    means ALL tourist are not cream of the top and culturally afluent, or that ALL tourist's do not represent these.

    I'm sorry, but I can't read the bits you are thinking but not writing.

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    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by matsp View Post
    And how will I know whether:

    means ALL tourist are not cream of the top and culturally afluent, or that ALL tourist's do not represent these.

    I'm sorry, but I can't read the bits you are thinking but not writing.

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    Tourists - the group of people that 'tour'. Since my statement directly and unequivicobly stated that Tourists do not represent the cream of the crop you can assume that I meant Tourists do not represent the cream of the crop and not 'Tourists are not cream of the crop'. Again, you are reading into my statements and then justifying it by basically claiming that because a similar statement has a different meaning that my statement is thus unclear. I didn't say Tourists are not cream of the crop, nor that no tourists are cream of the crop, nor that cream of the crop are not tourists, nor any other similar statement other than specifically what I did state.

    If I make the statment 'Bannanas are not as yellow as sunflowers'. Would you then attack that statement because some people think bananas are just as good or better than sunflowers and their shade of yellow is just as pretty or more so to some people than sunflower yellow? Either of those arguments have about as much to do with the statement 'Bananas are not as yellow as sunflowers' as your made up bull........ as to what can be read into my statement has to do with my actual statement.
    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

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    I choose to move to another country for a number of reasons "for a couple of years" - as to my ability of predicting the future, I give myself below average grads, as I'm still here nearly 14 years later, and no view of changing that anytime soon.
    Just out of curiosity, I'd be interested in hearing what makes you stay there.

    You are from Sweden, aren't you? Maybe you'll enjoy the pictures of my 2007 Sweden vacation: Padjelantaleden hiking trail pictures (yes, this is me).

    Greets,
    Philip
    All things begin as source code.
    Source code begins with an empty file.
    -- Tao Te Chip

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snafuist View Post
    Just out of curiosity, I'd be interested in hearing what makes you stay there.
    Basically, inertia: Moving somewhere else would require more effort than staying. Of course, now I have kids and family, so I that's even more effort to move.

    I'm not saying Sweden isn't nice - but like most places, where you live and where the nice bits of the country are quite often aren't the same.

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