women explained by engineers

This is a discussion on women explained by engineers within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; Somewhat related to this thread: http://kotaku.com/5143550/mario-expl...onships-for-us I found that pretty humorous...

  1. #16
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    Somewhat related to this thread:

    http://kotaku.com/5143550/mario-expl...onships-for-us

    I found that pretty humorous

  2. #17
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparrowhawk View Post
    Somewhat related to this thread:

    http://kotaku.com/5143550/mario-expl...onships-for-us

    I found that pretty humorous
    I didn't even get to the meat -- I fell off my chair when I saw the "SING HERO" logo and read this annoucement:

    "Last week, Activision filed a trademark application for something called Sing Hero...."

    I really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really hope that comes to pass. As long as I don't have to play it.

    [edit] okay I read the rest and now I'm crying, I hope you are happy...
    Last edited by MK27; 03-11-2009 at 02:15 PM.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by MK27 View Post
    I didn't even get to the meat -- I fell off my chair when I saw the "SING HERO" logo and read this annoucement:

    "Last week, Activision
    filed a trademark application for something called Sing Hero...."

    I really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really hope that comes to pass. As long as I don't have to play it.

    [edit] okay I read the rest and now I'm crying, I hope you are happy...
    How dare you use red text with no link. That's just downright misleading. I think ill make it blue. Actually ill just make the whole post a rainbow.
    Last edited by lruc; 03-12-2009 at 06:08 AM.
    Fried chicken for everybody!
    -Kernel Sanders

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by lruc View Post
    How dare you use red text with no link. That's just downright misleading. I think ill make it blue. Actually ill just make the whole post a rainbow.
    rainbows have red in them
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  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuantumPete View Post
    If you want a hard-to-read german typeface, try the Suetterlin Schrift.
    I learned to write in the Sütterlin typeface myself several weeks ago. It's so unreadable because "e" looks nearly exactly like "n". Every other letter more or less resembles its latin counterpart, though I'm still having trouble to read Sütterlin texts fluently (or at all, depending on the writer's skills).

    Furthermore, QuantumPete's picture shows how it looks when Sütterlin is written by third graders who try to impress their teacher (or used to... the font has been forbidden in schools in 1941 and has never been taught again in Germany).

    Here are some more examples:

    A recipe for "Tiroler Krapferln": http://www.sagen.at/doku/fo_fotos/Tirolerkrapferl.jpg
    (perfectly readable)

    A letter from Clotilde: http://www.vogtverlag.de/images/suetterlin.png
    (harder to read, but I like the look)

    Another letter: http://www.grossvaterbriefe.de/userf.../facsimile.jpg
    (absolutely cryptic, the only thing I can read are the first two words: "My dear ...")


    If there's someone around here who has texts written by experienced writers, I'd be glad to hear from you. My only source for practice material is the archive of the land registry office, and apart from the fact that these texts are full of abbreviations, they're plain boring.

    Greets,
    Philip
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    Source code begins with an empty file.
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  6. #21
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    Other than the fact that it's virtually impossible to read, I still don't see why anyone would ban a specific typeface??
    "I am probably the laziest programmer on the planet, a fact with which anyone who has ever seen my code will agree." - esbo, 11/15/2008

    "the internet is a scary place to be thats why i dont use it much." - billet, 03/17/2010

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by cpjust View Post
    Other than the fact that it's virtually impossible to read, I still don't see why anyone would ban a specific typeface??
    The "Schwabacher" typeface has been forbidden because Hitler/Bormann assumed it to be of Jewish origin (which is wrong, it's named after a town called "Schwabach"). As their solution for the "Jewish question" was the extinction of Jews and Jewish culture, it seems natural to restrict the use of a "Jewish" typeface. This semi-confidential newsletter from Borman instructs party members and the press on behalf of Hitler to discontinue the use of the Schwabacher "Judenlettern" (Jew-typeface) and use Antiqua instead: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...ntiqua1941.gif

    The Sütterlin typeface has been forbidden because the ultimate goal of the Nazi regime was dominance in Europe. But for the subordinated populaces to be able to understand written commandments, the Germans had to use a typeface that everyone was able to read. These subordinated people were not designated to be taught anything, and during a radio broadcast, Goebbels once uttered less charmingly: "we shall not hesitate to call them slaves". As a consequence, Hitler decided that German children should learn to read and write an internationally recognized typeface, namely the one that we're all used to today.


    Generally, it's hard to find any sense in the Nazi legislation at all. Its cruelty and malice is only superseded by the communist empire during the cold war. Today, it may sound funny to forbid typefaces, but I can spot a high amount of consistency with the Nazi ideology.

    Greets,
    Philip
    All things begin as source code.
    Source code begins with an empty file.
    -- Tao Te Chip

  8. #23
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    Well I understand why the Nazi's banned it, but is it still banned today? If so, that makes no sense.
    "I am probably the laziest programmer on the planet, a fact with which anyone who has ever seen my code will agree." - esbo, 11/15/2008

    "the internet is a scary place to be thats why i dont use it much." - billet, 03/17/2010

  9. #24
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    Well I understand why the Nazi's banned it, but is it still banned today? If so, that makes no sense.
    No, it's not banned. Today, the use of symbols commonly associated with National Socialism (such as the swastika, the "SS" Sig rune etc.) is forbidden, which is equally funny. By using, showing or even selling products with such symbols, you may get imprisoned for up to three years. Same goes for certain books, such as "Mein Kampf". In Germany, these books haven't been published since early 1945. Their possession used to be illegal, but I'm not sure about the current situation.

    Besides, there's the Antifa, a partly radical and partly illegal "anti-fascist movement", active in all major cities, and of course there's the average populace which tends to highly dislike any visible connections to National Socialism. In Germany, nobody would dare to publicly show a swastika, because you would run the risk of having your teeth kicked in after at most ten minutes.

    Using the Schwabacher or Sütterlin typeface is not forbidden, but it may get you into trouble because of its connection to the time before 1945.

    I know that this sounds ridiculous. It is.

    Greets,
    Philip
    All things begin as source code.
    Source code begins with an empty file.
    -- Tao Te Chip

  10. #25
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    The "Wiederbetätigungsgesetze" (something like "laws about doing it again") in Germany and Austria were created mostly to appease the Sowjet Union. In the years after the war, one main problem for these countries was that the Sowjets were trying to exert control, and the western Allies were trying to exert counter-control, leaving Germany and Austria to be squashed in the middle. The laws were basically created to pull away political ground from the Sowjets, who were using the fear of the reestablisment of national socialism as a major argument in their continued pressure.

    On the social level, of course, showing sympathy with nazis is going to give you serious problems, but the legal system should not have such prejudices. (You're allowed to show sympathy for other radical groups, after all. Freedom of opinion, and all that.) Yet is has, mostly as a relic from that time, but also because it would be an extremely unpopular move to get rid of them. It would get the proposers stamped as nazi sympathizers immediately.
    All the buzzt!
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  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by CornedBee View Post
    On the social level, of course, showing sympathy with nazis is going to give you serious problems, but the legal system should not have such prejudices. (You're allowed to show sympathy for other radical groups, after all. Freedom of opinion, and all that.) Yet is has, mostly as a relic from that time, but also because it would be an extremely unpopular move to get rid of them. It would get the proposers stamped as nazi sympathizers immediately.
    Who's showing sympathy for Nazi's?
    BTW, what "them" are you referring to by "unpopular move to get rid of them"?
    "I am probably the laziest programmer on the planet, a fact with which anyone who has ever seen my code will agree." - esbo, 11/15/2008

    "the internet is a scary place to be thats why i dont use it much." - billet, 03/17/2010

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by cpjust View Post
    Who's showing sympathy for Nazi's?
    BTW, what "them" are you referring to by "unpopular move to get rid of them"?
    The person trying to remove the anti-Nazi laws. The anti-Nazi laws.
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