fyshing lessons

This is a discussion on fyshing lessons within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; >teach fishing instead of giving out free fish. good say! that's why i hate responding to code posts, tho they ...

  1. #1
    Linguistic Engineer... doubleanti's Avatar
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    fyshing lessons

    >teach fishing instead of giving out free fish.

    good say! that's why i hate responding to code posts, tho they do help... and i usually reply in word descriptions since a lot of the technicality ends up in the users coding preference. [of course, when we do discuss preference, we can still talk with words]... and in my requests from this board [which are too few actually...] i usually speak in ideas, not code... so... good say... all agree?

    plus if you describe a sequence to any hmwk-mongers, you _do_ answer the question, but if they can't understand it, then they shouldn't be in their nth week of their programming course anyway! right? right!
    hasafraggin shizigishin oppashigger...

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    The problem is people don't look at the code you give them. The program I'm working on now has the user enter a password. cout was being a ***** so I decided to use printf(), which I never used before. The rest of the program is C++. Then someone posts a question on the board asking how to make the password type in * not the letters. I posted the code with printf in it. After I do that, someone else asks me to post it in C++, because printf is C (keep in mind this was only 1 or 2 statements). Now this is proof that some people can't sipmly look through code and try to figure out what it's doing. If everyone would just do that, we could all just copy and paste our code with little explaining.

    It's much easier to give out free fish

    BTW, that password thing should be on the FAQ by now if it already isn't.

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    Registered User Nutshell's Avatar
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    Sometimes, ppl just can't get the code right. It's not that they are lazy and doesn't do their homework or exercise, they wrote the code, but couldn't get it to work. Maybe their books doesn't teach enough or it's just a little logical error that's preventing the program to run correctly. When ppl post code when they have trouble ( like me ), little code snippets and telling me what's wrong really helps, but not having the program re-written and sending it to my email inbox.

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    Registered User Nutshell's Avatar
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    I agree that some ppl don't bother to think out the code. But other pppl who's willing to think out the code but no one's giving any solution to them, thats not fair is it.

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    Yeah, in some cases you're right, but when it's about 15 lines of code with some documentation, you'd at least expect them to ask what a certain line does, not ask you to re-write the whole damn thing.

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    Linguistic Engineer... doubleanti's Avatar
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    hmm well my motivation with programming [and math, which is from which i reapply it to programming of...] is that there is an answer, and if someone else can do it, i can too, given time... and if we all had a big-black-book-o-C++ then great. people find solace in the bible, and in the same sense, i find solace in my calculus book... [and/or C:TCR]... [let's not get into religion tho, the point was that you find your answers to your troubles in a an all-knowing book] so...

    oh, and dejavu... your replies have happened before... wow...
    hasafraggin shizigishin oppashigger...

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    there is an answer, and if someone else can do it, i can too, given time...
    Confident, eh? I differ from that. My approach is why waste time on reinventing the wheel? I'd rather take their answer when I need to and find answers to problems that haven't been answered yet. Call me lazy or immoral if you want, I call myself efficient (and sometimes lazy, too, lol).

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    Linguistic Engineer... doubleanti's Avatar
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    >I call myself efficient

    i would too. good job... nice idea... that's why i'm pushing my own envelope with my behold stuff... so far as that goes, and it's still satisfying anyhow... and besides that, so far as i know, human memory doesn't have a 64k segment limit, and humans aren't on compact mem module... so if you can understand without squeezing too hard, then you'll be fishing your whole lyfe with it...
    hasafraggin shizigishin oppashigger...

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    human memory doesn't have a 64k segment limit
    I agree. It's probably closer to 1028K.

    so if you can understand without squeezing too hard, then you'll be fishing your whole lyfe with it...
    I don't get it...

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    Registered User Nutshell's Avatar
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    BUt one possible reason that someone else can do it might be that he has some certain experience or his book teaches him how to do it. So maybe without extra help, the troubled-person may NEVER find the answer.

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    But who teaches the book? Someone had to have come up with it.

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    Linguistic Engineer... doubleanti's Avatar
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    okay well let's put the chicken and the egg aside for a moment... let's move the topic to: if humans had a upper cap on memory, would that mean that human potential also has an upper cap? we all have to choose a major when we go to college, and we all have to die eventually... so there is only so much you can do! which is why i never waste any time and make sure i'm havin' fun every second! if i were to pass any moment i'd go 'yeah, my life was great!]... so... i certainly hope the ISO doesn't find out we are just bodies... and if they do, well, i don't know what i'd do... it'd be like finding you had cancer...
    hasafraggin shizigishin oppashigger...

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    ISO? What's that?

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    Registered User Nutshell's Avatar
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    The authors of the book has insiders to tell them stuff. And you might ask: Well then who made up the languages?

    My answer is: Programming languages and studies are undertaken by whole team of people, sharing ideas and thoughts. But individual programmers only have one brain.

    hope u get what i mean.

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    I get exactly what you mean. I'm just trying to argue because I like to argue . But with enough time, a single person may be able to come up with some, if not all, of those ideas.

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