What Language are you writing in?

This is a discussion on What Language are you writing in? within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; I program in C++ and I have a pretty good idea of what im doing but Im not an expert. ...

  1. #1
    UnknownAmateur Programmer
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Were definitly not in Kasas anymore...
    Posts
    25

    What Language are you writing in?

    I program in C++ and I have a pretty good idea of what im doing but Im not an expert. Ive been self tought for about 9 months now, the first 6 in basic C. So I was wondering my copy of Visual Studio allows me to program in C# and Visual Basic, so I was curious if they are worth learning Visual Basic I looked at but didnt like and I have no idea about C#.
    I program using Visual Studio Professional 2008. I have little experience, I'm self taught. I started basic C in early March 2008 with a 1987 compiler and C++ this October with Visual Studio. I normally program in Visual C++ creating form programs. My current project is a simple game where I hide a dot and you have to find it in different random sinerios.

    My Catchphrase:
    DOS wasn't written in a day...

  2. #2
    Guest Sebastiani's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Waterloo, Texas
    Posts
    5,708
    I program in just about any language that the job demands, but in general, I prefer using C++. As far as C# and VB, they're pretty useful for platform-specific stuff, but suffer from (rather irritating and non-intuitive) language defects.
    Code:
    #include <cmath>
    #include <complex>
    bool euler_flip(bool value)
    {
        return std::pow
        (
            std::complex<float>(std::exp(1.0)), 
            std::complex<float>(0, 1) 
            * std::complex<float>(std::atan(1.0)
            *(1 << (value + 2)))
        ).real() < 0;
    }

  3. #3
    Unregistered User Yarin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,691
    I would become yet more familiar with C/C++ before moving on to another language.
    You may feel comfortable with C++ now, but after 9 months, there's still a bit more about the language to learn, mainly how to efficiently use it.
    Let me put it this way, it's much better to know only a few languages really well than to know a bunch of languages only enough to get by.
    I'd wait.
    A class that doesn't overload all operators just isn't finished yet. -- SmugCeePlusPlusWeenie
    A year spent in artificial intelligence is enough to make one believe in God. -- Alan J. Perlis

  4. #4
    & the hat of GPL slaying Thantos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    5,681
    It depends on what I'm writing. Right now I probably spend most of my time in PHP as I'm doing web applications. For desktop I'm spending more time in Java as I'm doing GUI programs. For CPU bound applications I tend to use C or C++. And for embedded programs I use C.

    I haven't used C# and have only limited experience with VB. VB annoys me, a lot, so I tend to say away from it.

  5. #5
    & the hat of GPL slaying Thantos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    5,681
    I actually completely disagree with Yarin. IMO it is better to broaden your horizons early before you get set into thinking in one mode of thinking. I think people would be better off if they were exposed to a bunch of different languages, especially if they use different paradigms, early on so that they can learn when to switch to another language for a particular task.

  6. #6
    chococoder
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    515
    For the last decade mostly Java, a bit of Ruby, some Rexx, C++, C, Delphi.
    Also Javascript, Python, an ever increasing amount of PL/SQL.

    Before that also x86 Assembler, Cobol, Fortran, Basic, Pascal.

    Try to learn new languages regularly, even if you don't use them in anger they give you a different perspective on things, make you a better developer.

  7. #7
    Kernel hacker
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Farncombe, Surrey, England
    Posts
    15,677
    The last few (15 or so) years, I've used C, C++ and PHP, along with a few lines of assembler now and again.

    Knowing more than one language (of different origin) is always good to get yourself a broader base to work on things from.

    --
    Mats
    Compilers can produce warnings - make the compiler programmers happy: Use them!
    Please don't PM me for help - and no, I don't do help over instant messengers.

  8. #8
    and the hat of copycat stevesmithx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    507
    I am coding for the past 1 year or so ( lol) and I usually code in C or java.
    Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted
    - Albert Einstein.


    No programming language is perfect. There is not even a single best language; there are only languages well suited or perhaps poorly suited for particular purposes.
    - Herbert Mayer

  9. #9
    Sweet
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    1,812
    I program mainly in C# right now. I like it alot.

    But I still have a strong love for the C++. I just don't get to program in it everyday at work.

    I have also messed around with VB.net. It and C# are very similar as far as what you can do. But I am not a fan of vb syntax. So I would choose C# over it any day.
    Woop?

  10. #10
    and the hat of sweating
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Toronto, ON
    Posts
    3,545
    In my current job it's Java, Perl & Bash; in my last job C++, Java, Rexx & Batch files; before that C++, Rational Visual Test (which is basically like VB) & Batch files.

    So yeah, learning different languages would be useful. Given the trend to move toward more (binary) portable languages like Java, I would suggest learning Java for sure, and VB even though I hate it, is good to know. Scripting languages like Bash & Perl are good too.
    "I am probably the laziest programmer on the planet, a fact with which anyone who has ever seen my code will agree." - esbo, 11/15/2008

    "the internet is a scary place to be thats why i dont use it much." - billet, 03/17/2010

  11. #11
    Super Moderator VirtualAce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    9,598
    ...even if you don't use them in anger ...
    How do you use a language in anger? Actually with VB that sorta makes sense.

    I program in primarily in C++ but dabble some in C# and ActionScript.

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    57
    I use D when I program.
    Used to use C++.

  13. #13
    ... kermit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    1,528
    Quote Originally Posted by Thantos View Post
    I actually completely disagree with Yarin. IMO it is better to broaden your horizons early before you get set into thinking in one mode of thinking. I think people would be better off if they were exposed to a bunch of different languages, especially if they use different paradigms, early on so that they can learn when to switch to another language for a particular task.
    I think there is some merit to this. Being limited in my time (I don't program for a living, but do something completely unrelated) I don't have the 'luxury' of spending a lot of time mastering any language, let alone one. C is the language I am most comfortable with, and though I have taken stabs at C++ (Python too), and really like some of the features it offers, I find that it is overwhelmingly large to learn, given lack of time. Seeing that C is my 'favourite' language, I tend to fall to it for *every* program I write, even if there might be a better language to use. This is actually something I was just thinking about the last couple of days; I have been contemplating writing a regex tutor of sorts, and already I am thinking in terms of C, and wondering if there might be an easier way (Python might work well enough). Sometimes I think it is time to learn a different language. I think I am crippling my efforts, because for some things, C is just a lot more work than is necessary.

    As an aside, does anyone here relate to the idea that you like your first language most, because it was your 'first'?

  14. #14
    Ethernal Noob
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    1,901
    I use mainly C#, I haven't used C++ in a while, and when I did I never did anything in it. I'm lacking a nice project to keep me occupied. Netflix has taken over.
    Here to Deceive, Inveigle, Obfuscate Since 1945

  15. #15
    Woof, woof! zacs7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    3,459
    Just C and Java for now, I'd love to get into C++ but I've got 2 largish projects going at the moment (one in C, one in Java).

    Other than that, vbscript at work (poor me!) and a bit of Perl.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

Similar Threads

  1. The value of learning a new programming language
    By h3ro in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 06-13-2009, 02:48 AM
  2. ASM to C language
    By TAZIN in forum C Programming
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 06-03-2009, 07:29 AM
  3. assembly language...the best tool for game programming?
    By silk.odyssey in forum Game Programming
    Replies: 50
    Last Post: 06-22-2004, 02:11 PM
  4. Language of choice after C++
    By gandalf_bar in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: 06-15-2004, 02:20 AM
  5. Enough language discussions.
    By VirtualAce in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-13-2004, 10:59 AM

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21