Need a new industry

This is a discussion on Need a new industry within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; > I've gotten the impression that they like to get young coders with no families so they can work them ...

  1. #16
    Woof, woof! zacs7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    3,459
    > I've gotten the impression that they like to get young coders with no families so they can work them to death... might be inaccurate.
    I'm kinda counting on that. But that's what CS grads are for, us SE grads go higher up

  2. #17
    Super Moderator VirtualAce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    9,586
    I think this is true in general, but every programming drone team also needs someone more experienced to coordinate and tackle the most difficult problems.
    Not sure if this is completely accurate or not. I know of at least two fellow co-workers who have moved on to game companies and both of them had families. I'm sure with your experience companies like NovaLogic, Microsoft Games, Infinity Ward, and GraphSim would definitely be interested in you.

    Novalogic does do work for the military and their Delta Force series brought on quite a bit of that work. They have not recently released much but there are rumors of a new product similar to Joint Operations. Microsoft has several simulations in the works and/or in the support phase (such as FSX) where your skills would be needed. Train Sim 2 is supposedly in the works as well as Combat Flight Sim 4 - although I'm not positive on that one. Infinity Ward does the Call of Duty series and they would certainly need and utilize your skill set. GraphSim refactored Falcon 4 into Falcon 4: Allied Force and they also would likely need your skills. Red Storm entertainment was hiring for several positions that you would certainly qualify for but I'm not sure if they still are. Couldn't hurt to drop them a resume. Simulation experience is a great asset to any game company since most games are real-time simulations of the world. I couldn't think of a more applicable skillset in games.

    Games would definitely be my choice. Just be careful of the company you choose as games is and always will be a volatile everchanging market. Also if you do feel the urge to apply for EA Games I would like to speak with you about it before you do.
    Last edited by VirtualAce; 10-28-2008 at 05:26 PM.

  3. #18
    chococoder
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    515
    Become a plumber or carpenter. Those are among the few jobs that can't easily be offshored, and will always be required.

  4. #19
    pronounced 'fib' FillYourBrain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    2,297
    Quote Originally Posted by jwenting View Post
    Become a plumber or carpenter. Those are among the few jobs that can't easily be offshored, and will always be required.
    Wow thanks for that helpful suggestion.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bubba View Post
    Also if you do feel the urge to apply for EA Games I would like to speak with you about it before you do.
    Sparked my curiousity. I guess I'll send you a private message about that.
    "You are stupid! You are stupid! Oh, and don't forget, you are STUPID!" - Dexter

  5. #20

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,041
    On the petrol. industry front there's a market for piping simulation software, e.g. how an operating engineer would line up the system to perform various cargo transfers, get a powerplant up and running, etc. This could include ship's/drill rigs, shoreside powerplants, etc. Requires experience with simulations, in general, math, graphics knowledge useful.

    Some examples of what I mean:

    Expertune < -- Automation and control, tuning PID controllers (get the most efficient controller outputs for changes in the process variable without overshoot), minimal graphics but useful

    Hydro flow (maybe it's called Pipe flow) < --- Tool that allows you to build a piping layout, define pumps and custom pump performance curves, estimates pressure head losses through the various pipes, flanges, fittings, elevation changes, etc. Laminar flow only IIRC.
    I'm not immature, I'm refined in the opposite direction.

  6. #21
    Hail to the king, baby. Akkernight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Faroe Islands
    Posts
    717
    Damn Bubba, didn't know those still existed :O
    Thought the big firms had eaten all of the smaller ones :/
    Just don't join EA for the sake of the gaming community :P they... They almost got Bioware too >.< like, they own them, but Bioware are badass and don't become just some part of EA :P
    But still, EA do some kind of witchcraft or something -.- even tho almost all their games have been bad, they still can keep people like me constantly interested in their games >.< EA can witchcraft, for sure
    Currently research OpenGL

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

Similar Threads

  1. Advice for breaking into the industry
    By Trennto in forum Game Programming
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 07-03-2008, 07:47 PM
  2. C++ Contractors Needed with Life Insurance Industry exp..
    By Bill Law in forum Projects and Job Recruitment
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-13-2007, 08:19 PM
  3. state of the industry
    By itld in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-05-2003, 02:41 PM
  4. Video Games Industry. 5 years left.
    By Cheeze-It in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 12-10-2002, 09:52 PM
  5. Understanding Programming Industry
    By kuphryn in forum C++ Programming
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-03-2002, 06:26 PM

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21